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December 6, 2012
This may be a moment in Senate history, when a senator made a proposal that, when given an opportunity for a vote on that proposal, filibustered his own proposal…I don’t think this has ever happened before.
Sen. Dick Durbin, after Mitch McConnell’s latest scheme blew up in his face. McConnell introduced legislation today that would allow the president to unilaterally raise the debt limit, suspecting that Democrats wouldn’t have the guts to vote for it. When it became clear that Democrats did indeed have the votes to pass the bill with a simple majority, McConnell filibustered it, preventing its passage. The United States Senate, ladies and gentlemen. source
15:23 // 1 year ago
November 17, 2012
The major development of the meeting was we made it clear our position is … we should freeze tax rates for the middle class and raise rates on the top [income] families. It was notable that neither Boehner nor McConnell shot that idea down.
A Democratic aide • Speaking about the “fiscal cliff” meeting between President Obama, Senate majority minority leader Mitch McConnell, Speaker of the House John Boehner, and their Democratic counterparts Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi. The meeting took place today, and reporting following its conclusion has suggested cautious optimism on the chances for a deal. What this means for either party’s base will remain unclear until some hard numbers are put to paper, but Boehner reportedly indicated the Republicans could support revenue increases, but only accompanied by significant spending cuts. This could rankle both sides, to varying degrees — the GOP has been doggedly opposed, in theory and in practice, to virtually all tax increases for years, while the traditional Democratic wing would argue immediate spending cuts aimed at long-term deficit reduction would hurt a fragile economic recovery in the short term. source
14:24 // 1 year ago
October 30, 2012
I’ve spent the morning reading various endorsements of Mitt Romney for president, and they all say the same thing: Mitch McConnell and John Boehner’s strategy worked.
Ezra Klein • In a new post on WonkBlog, commenting on a number of Romney endorsements that surprised him — most notably the Des Moines Register’s decision to endorse Mitt Romney, after endorsing the Democratic candidate in the previous five races. In his piece, Klein challenges the paper’s suggestion that President Obama was ineffective when dealing with Congress. He stops short of giving President Obama an endorsement, and recognizes the leadership abilities of Romney, but Klein is not unclear about his feelings on this particular line of logic. “There are good reasons to endorse Mitt Romney for president,” said Klein, adding, “But if you want the political system to work more smoothly, endorsing McConnell and Boehner’s strategy over the last four years is folly.”

— Scott @ ShortFormBlog (via election)

(via gov)

19:29 // 1 year ago
April 18, 2012
Mitt Romney has earned our party’s nomination and now deserves the support of every American still committed to government that serves the people rather than rules over them,
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels • Offering a firm endorsement for Mitt Romney. Now that Mitt’s the likely nominee, Daniels and other noted Republicans — John Boehner and Mitch McConnell — have finally chosen to make their Mitt endorsements public. Daniels is particularly notable, as more than a few people wanted him to run for president.
10:12 // 2 years ago
March 21, 2012

Mitch McConnell plans first vote as Senate Majority Leader

  • yeah… Mitch McConnell says that, should the GOP win back the Senate majority in 2012, his first order of business as Majority Leader will be to pass a bill repealing health care reform.
  • but… This idea only works if Republicans capture not only the Senate, but the White House, too. Oh, and they’d have to retain the House. This is all possible, but it’s far from a sure bet. source

» Jumping the gun? Harry Reid’s spokesman says that it “sounds like Sen. McConnell is getting a little ahead of himself.” Republicans’ chances of retaking the Senate got worse last month when Olympia Snowe unexpectedly announced her retirement, and worse still when Bob Kerrey decided to run for his old seat in Nebraska several weeks ago. Oh, and Elizabeth Warren is now polling ahead of Scott Brown in Massachusetts. Obviously, a lot can—and will—change between now and November, but McConnell’s comments should be probably be seen more as a PR move to invigorate the Republican base than anything else.

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20:00 // 2 years ago
February 27, 2012
Reports: In boon to Democrats, Bob Kerrey will seek old Senate seat after all
Bob’s Back: After previously saying he’d sit 2012 out, it looks like former Democratic Senator Bob Kerrey will run for his old Nebraska Senate seat after all (it’s currently held by Democrat Ben Nelson, who’s retiring). Kerrey’s decision to run is significant, as Republicans would almost certainly take the seat if he opted out, due to a rather weak Democratic bench in the Cornhusker State. However, Kerrey is generally regarded as a strong candidate, and his candidacy is perhaps Democrats’ best shot at retaining control of the seat . In an election year when Democrats have to defend 23 Senate seats, versus only 10 for Republicans, every little bit counts. [Author’s note: Apologies for using the word “seat” so many times in this article]. source
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Bob’s Back: After previously saying he’d sit 2012 out, it looks like former Democratic Senator Bob Kerrey will run for his old Nebraska Senate seat after all (it’s currently held by Democrat Ben Nelson, who’s retiring). Kerrey’s decision to run is significant, as Republicans would almost certainly take the seat if he opted out, due to a rather weak Democratic bench in the Cornhusker State. However, Kerrey is generally regarded as a strong candidate, and his candidacy is perhaps Democrats’ best shot at retaining control of the seat . In an election year when Democrats have to defend 23 Senate seats, versus only 10 for Republicans, every little bit counts. [Author’s note: Apologies for using the word “seat” so many times in this article]. source

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15:20 // 2 years ago
January 29, 2012
There is broad agreement on doing the payroll tax holiday through the end of the year … The problem is paying for it. … (Democrats) just don’t want to cut any spending. That is what made it problematic. But we will get it done. We will get it done before the end of February.
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell • Emphasizing that the payroll tax cuts that proved a thorn in the GOP’s side back around Christmas will get extended through the new year, no matter how many arms McConnell has to twist. The thing is, though, he’s not the guy who has to do the hard work. It’s Boehner in the House, who pissed off his rightward-leaning members by ignoring their wishes to score a deal. However, even Boehner is confident: “I’m confident that we’ll be able to resolve this fairly quickly,” he said. The tax cuts expire at the end of February, but there’s no word on how they plan to pay for this. source (viafollow)
12:17 // 2 years ago
December 22, 2011
The House should pass an extension that locks in the thousands of Keystone XL pipeline jobs, prevents any disruption in the payroll tax holiday or other expiring provisions, and allows Congress to work on a solution for the longer extensions.
Mitch McConnell also threw John Boehner under the bus regarding the payroll tax cut. He follows Karl Rove.
12:16 // 2 years ago
December 6, 2011

Occupy Congressional Offices: A variety of protest groups, including OurDC and OccupyDC, managed to make things fun and interesting at various Congressional offices today, most notably those of Mitch McConnell and John Boehner. For what it’s worth, Boehner’s spokesperson welcomed the protests: ”We respect their right to voice their opinions … The Speaker understands the American people want a government that listens to their concerns and works together to help create a better environment for job growth.”

21:06 // 2 years ago
September 18, 2011
Class warfare … may make for really good politics, but it makes for rotten economics.
Rep. Paul Ryan • Coming out, guns blazing, against Obama’s plan to raise the tax rate for the super-rich. Ryan, speaking on “Fox News Sunday,”also claimed that the tax would be in effect a “double tax” on investments, and would discourage investors from putting their money into the economy. “If you tax something more, you get less of it,” Ryan said. “If you tax job creators more, you get less job creation. If you tax their investment more, you get less investment.” Mitch McConnell, speaking on “Meet the Press,” had similar concerns about the “Buffett Rule,” which we found out about last night. source (viafollow)
10:29 // 2 years ago