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November 17, 2013

Millions affected by major storms, tornadoes in the Midwest

  • 53M the number of people who are at risk from today’s storms throughout the Midwest. A tornado has already been reported in Peoria, Ill., causing significant damage. source
15:23 // 9 months ago
January 22, 2013
shiracoffee:

Michael Keller and Allison Yarrow mapped the country’s abortion clinics and the distance women in different locations would need to travel to visit one:

The clearest trend on the map is the dearth of clinics through the center of the country—from northern Texas through Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wyoming, and North Dakota. Roughly 400,000 women of reproductive age (between 15 and 44) live more than 150 miles from the closest clinic in this region. The county farthest away from an abortion clinic is Divide, N.D. All of these states except Wyoming require 24-hour waiting periods between the time a woman schedules an abortion and the procedure.

Interactive version of the map here.
from The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan

On the 40th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, the ability of women in some midwestern states to receive abortions is less a contested legal issue than one of simple access.

shiracoffee:

Michael Keller and Allison Yarrow mapped the country’s abortion clinics and the distance women in different locations would need to travel to visit one:

The clearest trend on the map is the dearth of clinics through the center of the country—from northern Texas through Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wyoming, and North Dakota. Roughly 400,000 women of reproductive age (between 15 and 44) live more than 150 miles from the closest clinic in this region. The county farthest away from an abortion clinic is Divide, N.D. All of these states except Wyoming require 24-hour waiting periods between the time a woman schedules an abortion and the procedure.

Interactive version of the map here.

from The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan

On the 40th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, the ability of women in some midwestern states to receive abortions is less a contested legal issue than one of simple access.

21:07 // 1 year ago
April 14, 2012
The majority of surveyed Joplin residents did not immediately go to shelter upon hearing the initial warning, whether from local warning sirens, television, NWR [NOAA weather radio], or other sources.
From the National Weather Service’s report on last year’s tornado in Joplin • Detailing how, in severe storm conditions, a big part of safeguarding communities and lives depends on people taking warnings seriously. In one instance, a Joplin resident ignored a slew of warning signals, driving from place to place looking for an open restaurant despite seeing that some were barred against the brewing storm, and hearing tornado warnings throughout town. As a response, the NWS has implementing new, stronger and more frightening vocabulary to be used for high-risk storm alerts, such as “mass devastation,” “complete destruction,” and “not survivable.” We really hope everybody in the Midwest will prioritize their safety over the coming days – authorities anticipate big storms (and likely tornadoes) to roll through Kansas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska later tonight. source (viafollow)
15:49 // 2 years ago
March 3, 2012
Tornado outbreak tears across the Midwest and South
Tornado outbreak leaves towns leveled, at least 33 dead. A series of tornadoes left 16 dead in Kentucky, 14 dead in Indiana,  2 in Ohio, and 1 Alabama. Officials have warned that additional fatalities could be reported, and early reports suggest that the Indiana town of Marysville has been almost completely destroyed. In an interview with CNN, Governor Mitch Daniels said, ”we’re not unfamiliar with Mother Nature’s wrath out here in Indiana, but this is about as serious as we’ve seen in the years since I’ve been in this job.” (photo by C.E. Branham/The News and Tribune via Associated Press) source
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Tornado outbreak leaves towns leveled, at least 33 dead. A series of tornadoes left 16 dead in Kentucky, 14 dead in Indiana,  2 in Ohio, and 1 Alabama. Officials have warned that additional fatalities could be reported, and early reports suggest that the Indiana town of Marysville has been almost completely destroyed. In an interview with CNN, Governor Mitch Daniels said, ”we’re not unfamiliar with Mother Nature’s wrath out here in Indiana, but this is about as serious as we’ve seen in the years since I’ve been in this job.” (photo by C.E. Branham/The News and Tribune via Associated Press) source

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12:53 // 2 years ago
February 7, 2012
The day the Plains shook: The New Madrid Earthquake, 200 years later
Set your watches: At 3:45 a.m. CST, it will have been 200 years since the strongest earthquake Middle America has ever seen. One of four major earthquakes from the 1811-1812 era, the New Madrid Earthquake (which averaged about 7.8 in magnitude) was felt hundreds of miles away and was so powerful that it destroyed the Missouri town that gives it its name. But could it happen again? Experts say it’s likely, and the damage could be far worse. “If another quake of the magnitude of the New Madrid Quake of 1811 should hit the region, it would be the worst natural disaster in American history,” Arkansas state auditor Charlie Daniels wrote in the 1990s. ”Almost all of downtown Memphis would fall.” Is that enough to fret over, though? (Photo: 1904 photo of an earthquake fissure filled with intruded sand in Mississippi County, Missouri, originally created during the New Madrid Earthquake. Photo via USGS; see more photos here.) source
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Set your watches: At 3:45 a.m. CST, it will have been 200 years since the strongest earthquake Middle America has ever seen. One of four major earthquakes from the 1811-1812 era, the New Madrid Earthquake (which averaged about 7.8 in magnitude) was felt hundreds of miles away and was so powerful that it destroyed the Missouri town that gives it its name. But could it happen again? Experts say it’s likely, and the damage could be far worse. “If another quake of the magnitude of the New Madrid Quake of 1811 should hit the region, it would be the worst natural disaster in American history,” Arkansas state auditor Charlie Daniels wrote in the 1990s. ”Almost all of downtown Memphis would fall.” Is that enough to fret over, though? (Photo: 1904 photo of an earthquake fissure filled with intruded sand in Mississippi County, Missouri, originally created during the New Madrid Earthquake. Photo via USGS; see more photos here.) source

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1:22 // 2 years ago
May 27, 2011

Joplin tornado death toll numbers get murky, confusing

  • 156 people reported missing in the Joplin tornado, down from 232
  • 90 people formerly on the list were found alive, which is a relief
  • 22 more, however, were added to the list in the past day source

» And this is where the numbers really get confusing: With two different organizations — the state of Missouri and the city of Joplin — reporting two different official death toll figures (126 and 132, respectively), and around 19 of the missing identified as victims on the list of those accounted for, you’d be forgiven for being a bit confused by all these numbers. Let’s simplify it for you: It was a lot of people, and those still alive have a lot to recover from.

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18:31 // 3 years ago
Our goal is to get that number to zero. We will dedicate as much state resources as needed around the clock to ensure those family who have loved ones that they cannot find are connected.
Missouri Department of Public Safety Deputy Director Andrea Spillars • Describing the group’s goal to whittle down the list of 232 missing people in Joplin — some of whom are amongst the 126 killed in Sunday’s storm, but perhaps haven’t been identified. Others may remain missing, but others still may have skipped town without informing friend and relatives of their departure. Let’s hope it’s the latter. source (viafollow)
9:30 // 3 years ago
May 25, 2011

Woman dies after finding out about her dad’s death in Joplin tornado

Another crushingly sad tale from the Joplin storm: After a 54-year-old woman found out on Tuesday that her father died in Sunday’s incredibly tragic tornado in the Missouri town, she had a heart attack and later died. The woman, a schoolteacher, lived in a nearby town and attended church in the city of 50,000. Despite the fact that she wasn’t killed in the storm itself, the coroner says that they will consider her death a storm-related casualty. Such a gut punch. Officials in the city plan to continue searching for those missing, combing over areas they’ve covered as many as three times already — all in the hopes of finding a survivor in the rubble. Hold out hope. source

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11:19 // 3 years ago
May 24, 2011

In perspective: The possible costs of 2011’s U.S. natural disasters

  • $3B the estimated peak cost of the Joplin tornado, which hit on Sunday
  • $5B the estimated costs of the storms that slammed the South in April
  • $2.2B the estimated costs of the deliberate flooding on the Mississippi source

» A particularly deadly year for natural disasters: Before April, the weather was relatively calm, but then strong storms in the South and Plains states — complete with tornadoes and flooding — started hitting fast and furious. And with 482 killed by this year’s storms already, it’s been a year filled with heartbreak already.

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10:27 // 3 years ago