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December 23, 2012

Microsoft’s bad news? Windows 8 computers are selling slowly

  • 13% the drop in sales of Windows computers between the last week of October and the first week in December, compared to sales from one year ago. This is a bad sign for Microsoft, which launched Windows 8 during that time frame, and one blamed on various factors, including the bold design changes in the OS and the rise of the mobile market, which could be slowing down demand for desktops. The Surface, which was only for sale in Microsoft stores during that period, was likely a non-factor. source
19:16 // 1 year ago
October 21, 2012

Five reactions from average computer users trying Windows 8 for the first time

  • one It made me feel like the biggest amateur computer user ever.”
  • two "It was very difficult to get used to. I have an 8-year-old and a 10-year-old, and they never got used to it. They were like, ‘We’re just going to use Mom’s computer.’”
  • three "I read these tech pundits and journalists discussing how hard it’s gonna be for the general public to learn the new UI of Windows 8. Nonsense.”
  • four ”I like the pretty icons they have on here. That’s about it.
  • five “The feeling was very fluid. Definitely a step up from Windows 7.”

Have you tried it yet? What do you think?

22:03 // 1 year ago
October 16, 2012

Microsoft’s Surface pricing is out … and it’s not cheaper than the iPad

  • $499 the cost of a low-end 32GB Microsoft Surface RT, without the much-ballyhooed keyboard cover that the company made such a big deal about a while ago; even without the cover it’s roughly competitive to the iPad
  • $599 the cost of a 32GB Microsoft Surface RT with the cover; a 64GB version adds $100 to the price
  • $119 the cost of a standalone Microsoft Surface touch cover; a tactile version is $129. The pricing info is from a Microsoft.com page that was taken down, but screenshotted by TechCrunch. source
8:54 // 1 year ago
July 3, 2012
Today, a single Apple product — the iPhone — generates more revenue than all of Microsoft’s wares combined.
Vanity Fair • In a blog post previewing Kurt Eichenwald’s upcoming piece on the downfall of Microsoft, which has seen better days. Despite being years ahead on many technologies, including smartphones, e-readers and tablets, a bureaucratic culture often at odds with innovations cost them this lead. The company also rejected ideas which became bigger deals years later: For example, when a status-update feature was pitched for MSN Messenger years before Twitter and Facebook became huge, the idea was rejected out of hand. Now it’s 2012 and Microsoft is trying to right the ship. Can they?
18:35 // 1 year ago
June 19, 2012
In case you were wondering, Microsoft hasn’t given up on the original Surface product — which is a giant iPad-like table they released back in 2007. They’ve just renamed it to PixelSense, which makes less sense, but at least they didn’t kill the product entirely. Surface is a good name, but does it really work better for their new tablet than this?

In case you were wondering, Microsoft hasn’t given up on the original Surface product — which is a giant iPad-like table they released back in 2007. They’ve just renamed it to PixelSense, which makes less sense, but at least they didn’t kill the product entirely. Surface is a good name, but does it really work better for their new tablet than this?

0:13 // 1 year ago
June 18, 2012

fastcompany:

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer unveiled a suite of Microsoft Surface products, including a signature tablet. The 9.3 mm Microsoft Surface tablet, powered by Windows 8, is a hair thinner than the 9.4 mm iPad 3, and its 10.6-inch display has a full inch on the iPad’s. The Surface’s two standout features are a full-sized, multitouch keyboard with trackpad that also doubles as the device’s case, and a built-in kickstand for hands-free use. It also includes a magnetized stylus that uses digital ink and a full-sized USB 2 port.

Watch the video->

A little torn on this. Granted, we tend to be reflexively anti-Microsoft at times, but this probably is the most-aggressive attempt to take on Apple we’ve seen yet, and it’s worth taking seriously. They took Apple’s biggest iPad weakness — the lack of physical keyboard — and banked the entire device on it. It’s a smart approach, but you know, it’s one that seems like it’d be simple for a Kickstarter to copy completely. It’ll be interesting to see how this affects third-party vendors, too. Either way, this seems like an attempt to take out the netbook — if they price it right, at least.

20:46 // 1 year ago