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November 17, 2012
accuweather:

Amazing Leonid Meteor Shower Photos Captured By Stargazers

The Leonid meteor shower peaked early Saturday (Nov. 17), and some night sky watchers caught a great view.

We made a point to glimpse the Leonid shower this morning — anybody else have a penchant for stargazing?

accuweather:

Amazing Leonid Meteor Shower Photos Captured By Stargazers

The Leonid meteor shower peaked early Saturday (Nov. 17), and some night sky watchers caught a great view.

We made a point to glimpse the Leonid shower this morning — anybody else have a penchant for stargazing?

15:50 // 1 year ago
August 12, 2012
It’s not a bird or a plane … it’s a meteor shower!
Sweet meteor shower, dude: The peak of the Perseid meteor shower occurred early Sunday morning. Where does the Perseid meteor shower come from? It’s been seen by people “for at least 2,000 years. It occurs each year in late July and early August when the Earth passes through a trail of dust and ice from the comet Swift-Tuttle.” You can maybe catch some more tonight, if you’re lucky to have a dark and clear sky. (Clear skies, dark nights, can’t lose.)  source
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Sweet meteor shower, dude: The peak of the Perseid meteor shower occurred early Sunday morning. Where does the Perseid meteor shower come from? It’s been seen by people “for at least 2,000 years. It occurs each year in late July and early August when the Earth passes through a trail of dust and ice from the comet Swift-Tuttle.” You can maybe catch some more tonight, if you’re lucky to have a dark and clear sky. (Clear skies, dark nights, can’t lose.)  source

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15:23 // 2 years ago
October 20, 2011
Meteor shower: An excuse for folks with binoculars to look less weird.
Keep your eyes on the skies, folks. It’s time for another Orionid meteor shower, guys! “From tomorrow up to 30 meteors an hour could be seen as they burn up, which can be best viewed in the northern hemisphere, with the optimum viewing times likely to be at around 1am or 5am.” This happens every October as the Earth passes through what’s been left by Haley’s Comet. source
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Keep your eyes on the skies, folks. It’s time for another Orionid meteor shower, guys! “From tomorrow up to 30 meteors an hour could be seen as they burn up, which can be best viewed in the northern hemisphere, with the optimum viewing times likely to be at around 1am or 5am.” This happens every October as the Earth passes through what’s been left by Haley’s Comet. source

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23:47 // 3 years ago