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February 25, 2013
16:08 // 1 year ago
December 12, 2012
14:35 // 1 year ago
October 10, 2012

Obama leads in Florida (or, why you shouldn’t stop polling swing states three weeks before the election)

  • yesterday ”North Carolina, Virginia and Florida, we’ve already painted those red,” pollster David Paleologos told Fox News last night. “We’re not polling any of those states again.”
  • today A new University of Florida poll shows President Obama leading Mitt Romney by four points in the Sunshine State. source

Of course, four points isn’t that much of a lead, but it somewhat undercuts the argument for halting polls there. However, the more interesting result in the poll is that 37% of likely voters haven’t yet formed an opinion on Paul Ryan, further upping the stakes for tomorrow’s vice presidential debate. Also, on the question of who Floridians trust to strengthen Medicare, Obama leads by 14 points.

19:12 // 2 years ago
September 19, 2012
16:58 // 2 years ago
May 2, 2012

U.S. officials crack down on Medicare fraud schemes nationwide

  • seven the number of cities in which the Medicare fraud raids took place
  • 100+ the number of people charged in the raids, including doctors
  • $450M the amount the fraud schemes allegedly cost the government source

» The biggest takedown of its kind: Today, raids took place in Miami, Tampa, Chicago, Baton Rouge, Detroit, Houston and Los Angeles as part of a three-year ongoing crackdown on Medicare fraud, according to an announcement by Attorney General Eric Holder and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius Wednesday. The frauds included ”every kind of scheme you can think of,” according to one source on the matter.

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14:11 // 2 years ago
March 29, 2012

Ryan budget passes, heads to certain death in the Senate

  • yesThe House GOP passed this year’s Paul Ryan budget, the party’s annual flagship legislation, with 10 Republicans voting against it and no Democrats voting for it.
  • noThe bill won’t go anywhere from here, as it’s now in Senate Democrats’ hands, and Democrats, as in past years, are none too fond of Ryan’s budget. source
20:40 // 2 years ago
March 21, 2012
Breakdown: Paul Ryan’s new plan to cut $5.3 trillion in spending in 10 years
The budget-buster’s latest attempt: On Tuesday, powerful Rep. Paul Ryan pitched his latest attempt to trim the deficit by focusing on spending cuts, choosing to leave spending at the Pentagon intact while focusing more on domestic programs. The pitch is largely the same as Ryan’s plan last year. “We owe the country an alternative path if we don’t like the path the president is taking us on.” Ryan said about his plan. “Whoever our nominee is going to be owes the country that choice of two futures. We’re helping them put this together.” A breakdown:
one The plan would cut major spending initiatives for the poor and handing their administration over to the states. Popular funding programs like Pell Grants would be restricted to the neediest.
two The Ryan plan would also add new restrictions to Medicare, raising the age and encouraging those on the system to buy private insurance. The current Medicare would still be an option.
threeThe current tax bracket structure would be simplified from ten into six: The highest tax rate would fall significantly, and corporations would get taxed lower rates on overseas profits. source
» Detractors abound: Ryan’s plan did not go over well with the Obama administration: “The House budget once again fails the test of balance, fairness, and shared responsibility,” claimed White House Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer, who said the plan benefited the very rich while shouldering the poor with the bill. Others complained about the lack of detail, including Howard Gleckman, blogging for the Christian Science Monitor, who complains about the lack of details: “His budget includes a convincing and articulate explanation about what’s wrong with a tax system with high rates and a narrow base,” Gleckman writes. “He just doesn’t say what he’d do about it.” What do you think of Ryan’s latest budget plan? (Photo by Gage Skidmore)
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The budget-buster’s latest attempt: On Tuesday, powerful Rep. Paul Ryan pitched his latest attempt to trim the deficit by focusing on spending cuts, choosing to leave spending at the Pentagon intact while focusing more on domestic programs. The pitch is largely the same as Ryan’s plan last year. “We owe the country an alternative path if we don’t like the path the president is taking us on.” Ryan said about his plan. “Whoever our nominee is going to be owes the country that choice of two futures. We’re helping them put this together.” A breakdown:

  • one The plan would cut major spending initiatives for the poor and handing their administration over to the states. Popular funding programs like Pell Grants would be restricted to the neediest.
  • two The Ryan plan would also add new restrictions to Medicare, raising the age and encouraging those on the system to buy private insurance. The current Medicare would still be an option.
  • threeThe current tax bracket structure would be simplified from ten into six: The highest tax rate would fall significantly, and corporations would get taxed lower rates on overseas profits. source

» Detractors abound: Ryan’s plan did not go over well with the Obama administration: “The House budget once again fails the test of balance, fairness, and shared responsibility,” claimed White House Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer, who said the plan benefited the very rich while shouldering the poor with the bill. Others complained about the lack of detail, including Howard Gleckman, blogging for the Christian Science Monitor, who complains about the lack of details: “His budget includes a convincing and articulate explanation about what’s wrong with a tax system with high rates and a narrow base,” Gleckman writes. “He just doesn’t say what he’d do about it.” What do you think of Ryan’s latest budget plan? (Photo by Gage Skidmore)

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11:02 // 2 years ago
December 20, 2011
Politifact’s controversial “Lie of the Year”: Did the Republicans vote to end Medicare? Politifact says no. Liberal bloggers such as Paul Krugman have long criticized their reasoning on this issue, with Krugman today responding to the “Lie of the Year” with a blog post titled “Politifact, R.I.P." For what it’s worth, it’s a game of schematics: The Ryan plan, which eventually lost popular support among voters, would’ve heavily privatized the system, making it a shell of its former self, but to Politifact, that isn’t the same as killing it. What do you all think? Vote in our Quipol below: 
Quipol

Politifact’s controversial “Lie of the Year”: Did the Republicans vote to end Medicare? Politifact says no. Liberal bloggers such as Paul Krugman have long criticized their reasoning on this issue, with Krugman today responding to the “Lie of the Year” with a blog post titled “Politifact, R.I.P." For what it’s worth, it’s a game of schematics: The Ryan plan, which eventually lost popular support among voters, would’ve heavily privatized the system, making it a shell of its former self, but to Politifact, that isn’t the same as killing it. What do you all think? Vote in our Quipol below: 

12:41 // 2 years ago
October 27, 2011
15:24 // 2 years ago