The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

August 11, 2013

People pay money for outside chance of never seeing family ever again

  • 100k+ the number of people that have paid money for the chance to go to Mars, without hope of ever coming back. They’ve applied for the Mars One project which will pick four of those people to leave and never come home in 2022.
  • $38 the amount it costs U.S. residents to have an outside chance of leaving home and never seeing family and friends ever again. The private project apparently has appeal, because 30,000 of them have signed up. source
8:46 // 1 year ago
April 6, 2013
breakingnews:

Scientists work on fusion rocket for Mars
NBC News: Researchers at the University of Washington say they’ve built all the pieces for a fusion-powered rocket system that could get a crew to Mars in 30 days. 

“If we can pull off a fusion demonstration in a year, with hundreds of thousands of dollars … there might be a better, cheaper, faster path to using fusion in other applications,” John Slough, a research assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics, told NBC News. …
Timetables for the advent of fusion energy applications have repeatedly shifted to the right, reviving the old joke that the dawn of the fusion age will always be 30 years away.

Photo: An artist’s conception shows a spacecraft powered by a fusion-driven rocket. (UW / MSNW)

Saturdays have become a veritable “this week in space” day around here lately, as last week we touched on the development of the solar-sail project “Sunjammer,” and this week brings exciting news on the Martian travel front. Of course, relying on fusion energy, this is still theoretical, and thus doen’t speak to anything assured — but isn’t it fun to daydream about a month-long jaunt to Mars anyhow?

breakingnews:

Scientists work on fusion rocket for Mars

NBC News: Researchers at the University of Washington say they’ve built all the pieces for a fusion-powered rocket system that could get a crew to Mars in 30 days. 

“If we can pull off a fusion demonstration in a year, with hundreds of thousands of dollars … there might be a better, cheaper, faster path to using fusion in other applications,” John Slough, a research assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics, told NBC News. …

Timetables for the advent of fusion energy applications have repeatedly shifted to the right, reviving the old joke that the dawn of the fusion age will always be 30 years away.

Photo: An artist’s conception shows a spacecraft powered by a fusion-driven rocket. (UW / MSNW)

Saturdays have become a veritable “this week in space” day around here lately, as last week we touched on the development of the solar-sail project “Sunjammer,” and this week brings exciting news on the Martian travel front. Of course, relying on fusion energy, this is still theoretical, and thus doen’t speak to anything assured — but isn’t it fun to daydream about a month-long jaunt to Mars anyhow?

15:26 // 1 year ago
March 12, 2013

latimes:

Life on Mars…Maybe

A sample pulled from Mars just last month has been thoroughly examined by the Mars Science Laboratory Mission, and earlier today scientists declared that they have finally found solid evidence that Mars could have once sustained life.

From mission lead scientist John Grotzinger of Caltech:

“We have found a habitable environment that is so benign and is so supportive of life that probably if this water was around and you had been on the planet, you would have been able to drink it.”

Read more via Science Now.

Photos: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/MSSS

This is the sort of reblog that doesn’t even need much comment, because its worth and relevance is so self-evident. All hail the Curiosity rover.

19:59 // 1 year ago
February 9, 2013
A banner day for the Mars rover Curiosity, as it conducted its first drilling beneath the surface layer of a martian rock today. The hope is to gain information about long-past, possibly wet environments on the red planet by taking samples from beneath its surface – in this case, 2.5 inches deep. The rock powder generated from the drilling was saved by the Curiosity, and will be analyzed by its highly sophisticated on-board laboratory. (Photo by  NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS) source 

A banner day for the Mars rover Curiosity, as it conducted its first drilling beneath the surface layer of a martian rock today. The hope is to gain information about long-past, possibly wet environments on the red planet by taking samples from beneath its surface – in this case, 2.5 inches deep. The rock powder generated from the drilling was saved by the Curiosity, and will be analyzed by its highly sophisticated on-board laboratory. (Photo by  NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS) source 

13:35 // 1 year ago
January 26, 2013
nbcnews:

Curiosity rover snaps 1st photos of Mars at night
(Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has captured its first nighttime view of the Red Planet using a camera and ultraviolet light on its robotic arm.
Read the complete story.

As long as this intrepid little rover is snapping away, we think you owe it to yourself to see what it captures. Unprecedented visual access to the Martian terrain up close? Yes please.

nbcnews:

Curiosity rover snaps 1st photos of Mars at night

(Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has captured its first nighttime view of the Red Planet using a camera and ultraviolet light on its robotic arm.

As long as this intrepid little rover is snapping away, we think you owe it to yourself to see what it captures. Unprecedented visual access to the Martian terrain up close? Yes please.

(via nbcnews)

15:59 // 1 year ago
November 20, 2012
nbcnews:

Curiosity’s Mars discovery called ‘one for history books’
(Photo: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Malin Space Science Systems)
NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has apparently made a discovery “for the history books,” but we’ll have to wait a few weeks to find out what the new Red Planet find may be, media reports suggest.
Read the complete story.

What could it be? This is going to be on our minds constantly now!

nbcnews:

Curiosity’s Mars discovery called ‘one for history books’

(Photo: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Malin Space Science Systems)

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has apparently made a discovery “for the history books,” but we’ll have to wait a few weeks to find out what the new Red Planet find may be, media reports suggest.

What could it be? This is going to be on our minds constantly now!

(via nbcnews)

19:26 // 1 year ago
September 11, 2012
inothernews:

I LOOK GOOD   A mosaic of photos taken by an imager on NASA’s Curiosity rover shows the underside of the rover and its six wheels, with Martian terrain stretching back to the horizon. The four circular features on the front edge of the rover are the lenses for the left and right sets of Curiosity’s hazard avoidance cameras, or Hazcams. Because of the different perspectives used for different images, some of the borders of the photos don’t line up precisely.  (Photo: ASA / JPL via NBC News)

Considering he’s on Mars all by himself, I don’t think we can judge Curiosity for the incomplete camera work.

inothernews:

I LOOK GOOD   A mosaic of photos taken by an imager on NASA’s Curiosity rover shows the underside of the rover and its six wheels, with Martian terrain stretching back to the horizon. The four circular features on the front edge of the rover are the lenses for the left and right sets of Curiosity’s hazard avoidance cameras, or Hazcams. Because of the different perspectives used for different images, some of the borders of the photos don’t line up precisely.  (Photo: ASA / JPL via NBC News)

Considering he’s on Mars all by himself, I don’t think we can judge Curiosity for the incomplete camera work.

10:13 // 2 years ago
August 28, 2012
nbcnews:

Listen to the first song from Mars
Hip-hop musician Will.i.am’s “Reach for the Stars” officially became the first song broadcast from Mars today, thanks to a signal beamed from NASA’s Curiosity rover.
“This is the first time that a song’s ever come from another planet,” Leland Melvin, NASA’s associate administrator for education and a former astronaut, told students at an educational event at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
Read the complete story. 

You know, if the aliens come, we should be promoting our highest artistic work. Not the Black Eyed Peas. It’s like introducing Martians to our cinematic history through “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians.” I mean, how hard would it have been to put on some John Cage for these folks? You wouldn’t even have had to broadcast anything!

nbcnews:

Listen to the first song from Mars

Hip-hop musician Will.i.am’s “Reach for the Stars” officially became the first song broadcast from Mars today, thanks to a signal beamed from NASA’s Curiosity rover.

“This is the first time that a song’s ever come from another planet,” Leland Melvin, NASA’s associate administrator for education and a former astronaut, told students at an educational event at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

Read the complete story. 

You know, if the aliens come, we should be promoting our highest artistic work. Not the Black Eyed Peas. It’s like introducing Martians to our cinematic history through “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians.” I mean, how hard would it have been to put on some John Cage for these folks? You wouldn’t even have had to broadcast anything!

(via nbcnews)

18:56 // 2 years ago
August 22, 2012

hypervocal:

Watch Curiosity land on Mars in full, glorious HD. 

There’s a little noise reduction, color balance and sharpening, but this is all Mars, baby. Now that the MARDI descent imager has sent home its full collection of 1600 by 1200 images, NASA could piece together a video of the landing. Missing frames were interpolated using thumbnail data.

MORE MARS:
• 7 Years in 7 Minutes: NASA Engineer Takes Us Inside the Landing
• Obama Mentions ‘Mohawk Guy’ on NASA Call, Gets Mohawk
• Watch Ecstatic NASA Engineers Celebrate as Curiosity Lands

High-resolution Mars will be the coolest thing you’ll see today.

10:41 // 2 years ago
August 7, 2012

What the descent was like: Here’s a clip of the Curiosity Rover on its final descent to Mars. It’s a big of a sneak-peek — the hi-res stuff won’t come until later, but the low-res stuff should appease you dudes for now.

10:15 // 2 years ago