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December 29, 2012
The traditional left-right split has historic and symbolic value… [but] it does not highlight the real alliance that Italy needs — one that focuses on Europe and reforms.
Mario Monti, former Italian Prime Minister • Announcing his intention to run in the upcoming election for his old job, which he resigned from last week, and which has recently become a prize sought by Monti’s politically disgraced predecessor, Silvio Berlusconi. Monti, ushered in in 2011 to impose some unpopular austerity measures during the Italian debt crisis, is expected to lead a coalition of centrists against Berlusconi, the sex-scandalized former right-wing PM and media magnate. source
15:36 // 1 year ago
December 23, 2012

Newly-resigned Italian PM Mario Monti may run in next election after all

  • Friday A little more than a week after he announced he would do so, Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti left office on Friday, an office he was appointed to in an effort to stabilize the disarray facing the Italian financial system.
  • Sunday Looks like we may not have seen the last of Monti. The appointed leader said he would consider running for a second term in office, as political officials have asked him to stick around in the wake of the resignation. “If a credible political force asked me to be candidate as prime minister for them, I would consider it,” he said. The election would be in February. source
19:42 // 1 year ago
December 10, 2012
Here’s departing Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, in his “see ya suckers” pose. Monti, essentially a technocrat put in place to help Italy deal with the country’s financial crisis, announced his resignation over the weekend. He was far more liked among European leaders, who say his reform policies must stay in place, than he was amongst Italian politicians, who look to change them. (photo by Eric Gaillard/Reuters)

Here’s departing Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, in his “see ya suckers” pose. Monti, essentially a technocrat put in place to help Italy deal with the country’s financial crisis, announced his resignation over the weekend. He was far more liked among European leaders, who say his reform policies must stay in place, than he was amongst Italian politicians, who look to change them. (photo by Eric Gaillard/Reuters)

8:32 // 1 year ago
December 8, 2012
I return to politics with despair and out of a sense of responsibility. I enter the race to win.
The once (and future?) Italian Prime Minister, Silvio Berlusconi • Revealing what many observers had suspected over recent months — he is, contrary to his initial insistences, eying a run to get his old job back. Berlusconi resigned in November 2011, following a scandal-plagued few years — remember Ruby the Heart Stealer, anyone? In October, he was sentenced for tax evasion by an Italian court, but due to the statute of limitations against the length of the charges (dating back to 2006), Berlusconi may well get off without serving a day of the four-year prison sentence he received. But dodging that, and becoming PM again? He’s banking on next year being “the year of Silvio Berlusconi,” and we’re enrapt as to whether he’s right. source
12:26 // 1 year ago
July 13, 2012
Back for more? Word is that Silvio Berlusconi, the Italian Prime Minister who left office amid heavy scandal might get a second wind, in the wake of a strong, hugely-unpopular austerity program that took hold after he left office eight months ago. His allies are hoping he’ll run for office again, though he hasn’t shown his hand quite yet. (Photo by Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images)

Back for more? Word is that Silvio Berlusconi, the Italian Prime Minister who left office amid heavy scandal might get a second wind, in the wake of a strong, hugely-unpopular austerity program that took hold after he left office eight months ago. His allies are hoping he’ll run for office again, though he hasn’t shown his hand quite yet. (Photo by Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images)

16:20 // 1 year ago
November 16, 2011
Italy replaces Berlusconi with a technocrat: Mario Monti, an economist, just took power, and did it with a bunch of people who most assuredly aren’t politicians. Why? Well, Monti isn’t concerned about winning an election. He’s there to fix the country. And because he has such a specific role, he can do things people don’t like to solve the problem. Will this put them on the right track? Too soon to tell.

Italy replaces Berlusconi with a technocrat: Mario Monti, an economist, just took power, and did it with a bunch of people who most assuredly aren’t politicians. Why? Well, Monti isn’t concerned about winning an election. He’s there to fix the country. And because he has such a specific role, he can do things people don’t like to solve the problem. Will this put them on the right track? Too soon to tell.

11:38 // 2 years ago