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August 24, 2013
My main takeaway is that these are all essentially car magazines. They feature money shots of various guns, plenty of product reviews, and geeky, unbridled enthusiasm for their subject matter. They rarely stray into politics. If you don’t own a gun, there’s no real reason for you to read them. But, in the interest of science, I read them cover to cover all the same.
Slate writer Justin Peters • Discussing the popularity of gun magazines, which have actually seen an increase in sales in the first six months of 2013. Peters did some research and here are his takeaways.
13:10 // 8 months ago
March 6, 2013

How Time Warner slowly but surely split into a bunch of little parts

  • Time-Life Not nearly as big as the other parts, but people recognize the name, right? The book and music marketing arm of the company, named after the two magazines which made Time Inc. famous, was spun off in 2003 and had to start running a disclaimer that said ”not affiliated with Time Warner Inc. or Time Inc.” Sounds about right.
  • Time Warner Cable The first big chunk to fall, the cable company was spun off partly because it was seen as having more potential to grow under a structure different from that of a pure content company. The split, which took place over a four year period, was finalized in March 2009. (Conversely, Comcast in recent years has taken the opposite approach, buying out NBC Universal from General Electric to become a top-down cable and entertainment empire.)
  • AOL The digital arm of Time Warner, which was once so massive that AOL bought Time Warner in 2000, ultimately became a drag on both companies after it became clear that there weren’t enough 70-year-olds to keep the legacy AOL service at a high level of profitability forever. In December 2009, the company, whose value had declined significantly in the period that Time Warner owned it, was spun off to its own space on the stock market. It eventually made a pure-content play, which has recently brought it success.
  • Time Inc. While the magazine industry came first, it would not remain the key part of Time’s empire, and after a failed merger of some of the magazines with the Better Homes and Gardens-owning magazine chain Meredith, Time Warner announced it was spinning off all of its magazines into a single company on Wednesday.
  • Time Warner So, here’s what’s now left—the cable channels (including HBO, TNT, TBS and CNN), the film studios (New Line Cinema, Warner Bros.), and the other entertainment arms. So, really, it’s just Warner and the remains of Ted Turner’s corporate empire. Synergy doesn’t last forever, right?
23:28 // 1 year ago
December 25, 2012
On Facebook, the media eats itself. Ten days ago, The Daily closed its doors. This week, Newsweek published its last print issue. Today, this ad appears to be banking on picking up old Daily customers by selling them on Newsweek’s digital edition using Facebook ads. That’s not depressing at all.

On Facebook, the media eats itself. Ten days ago, The Daily closed its doors. This week, Newsweek published its last print issue. Today, this ad appears to be banking on picking up old Daily customers by selling them on Newsweek’s digital edition using Facebook ads. That’s not depressing at all.

21:42 // 1 year ago
December 13, 2012
thepoliticalnotebook:

somersaultmag:

It’s here! Click through on the photo of the cover of Somersault’s Volume 1, Issue 1 to read our magazine in full (for free). The cover art is Paul in Paris by Gregory Muenzen.
Stay tuned: we’ll be posting the pieces individually on our website as well so that you can share and comment.

And here it is, all ready to be read. 

One of the coolest Tumblr projects in a long while, in editorial form.

thepoliticalnotebook:

somersaultmag:

It’s here! Click through on the photo of the cover of Somersault’s Volume 1, Issue 1 to read our magazine in full (for free). The cover art is Paul in Paris by Gregory Muenzen.

Stay tuned: we’ll be posting the pieces individually on our website as well so that you can share and comment.

And here it is, all ready to be read. 

One of the coolest Tumblr projects in a long while, in editorial form.

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

8:22 // 1 year ago
July 16, 2012
Seventeen Magazine and the Body Peace Treaty: Building on a victory
Here’s the second entry in our weekly post series, “The Pitch.” This post, written by our very own Sami Main, analyzes the broader impact of Seventeen Magazine’s recent “Body Peace Treaty.” Find her on Twitter over here.
It happened once. Can it happen again? It’s the stuff of really great TV shows: A few months ago, 14-year-old Julia Bluhm led a petition against Seventeen, a magazine whose audience is primarily young girls. She wanted editors at the magazine to adopt healthier Photoshopping habits and to use models that look more “realistic” to actual people. What happened next (hint: look at the picture above) has some wondering if Bluhm may have started a real trend. ShortFormBlog’s Sami Main analyzes the cultural impact of Bluhm’s simple idea with a wide reach. Read more after the jump.
[[MORE]]
A simple petition, a big impact
84,000 signatures on Bluhm’s petition
» The end result: The magazine’s editor-in-chief Ann Shoket effectively gave into the petition — while claiming “we never alter the way the girls on our pages really look,” the person in charge of the magazine made a promise to her readers. “Our Body Peace Project is one of the cornerstones of our mission,” she wrote in a note responding to the petition. “We want every girl to stop obsessing about what her body looks like and start appreciating it for what it can do! And while we work hard behind the scenes to make sure we’re being authentic, your notes made me realize that it was time for us to be more public about our commitment.”
The reaction to the message

Now, it’s great that Seventeen has come forward, after some pressure, in order to be more open and honest about its policies. (It’s also a big victory for an activist group, SPARK, which has been fighting to limiting sexualized images of young girls in mainstream culture.) Magazines that have a younger audience have more of a responsibility to their readers who are still developing their self-image. Overall, reaction to the message has been positive, though some cultural commentators disagree with the motivations behind the idea. “If you want to use ‘real girls,’ Shoket, go for it,” argues Slate writer Hanna Rosin, citing the model used in the photo accompanying the “Body Peace Treaty” image. ”That might make for a really cool photo shoot. But this is not it.”
Previous cultural context, in Barbie form
While Barbie’s trademark nipple-less, mountainous, hard-plastic breasts are being cut down to size and that itty-bitty waist is getting bigger, her hips are also set to slim down with the new model, making her not so much more healthy and realistic as simply pubescent.
Mother Jones writer Lisa Jervis • Discussing a 1997 change to Mattel’s iconic Barbie dolls, which changed their waists and bust size. But the changes Mattel made didn’t come from the same motivations as Seventeen Magazine’s recent changes: Mattel’s change to conform to the “reality of fashion,” where Seventeen’s change came more from a place of compassion and understanding. source
The next target: Teen Vogue

Next up? Another magazine: With one victory past them, another petition was started by Carina Cruz and Emma Stydahar, two of Bluhm’s friends, against Teen Vogue. “It’s time for an end to the digitally enhanced, unrealistic ‘beauty’ we see in the pages of magazines,” reads the petition. “We are demanding that teen magazines stop altering natural bodies and faces so that real girls can be the new standard of beauty.” Teen Vogue, however, might be a tougher nut to crack.
32,000 signatures on the newest petition source
» The magazine’s reaction: It looks like Teen Vogue might be a tougher nut to crack. “Teen Vogue makes a conscious and continuous effort to promote a positive body image among our readers. We feature healthy models on the pages of our magazine and shoot dozens of non-models and readers every year and do not retouch them to alter their body size,” Erin Kaplan, the magazine’s PR rep, said to AdWeek. Some media outlets, like Gawker’s female-oriented Jezebel, reacted to the magazine’s statement negatively.
So what’s the next step, anyway?
One step forward, one step back. It seemed like there was a good amount of momentum toward a healthier age of magazines when Seventeen announced its support. Teen Vogue may not be as body conscious as other publications, but young readers still look to its pages for advice and guidance; that’s something that shouldn’t be taken lightly. The fact that it has ignored such a request from its readers is a little disheartening. Maybe once it sees the effects of the positive press Seventeen received, Teen Vogue will change its tune. Beyond the magazine world, is there something popular culture can learn from Seventeen?
Sami Main is a ShortFormBlog staff writer who’s big on BuzzFeed. Contact her @samimain.
 

Seventeen Magazine and the Body Peace Treaty: Building on a victory

Here’s the second entry in our weekly post series, “The Pitch.” This post, written by our very own Sami Main, analyzes the broader impact of Seventeen Magazine’s recent “Body Peace Treaty.” Find her on Twitter over here.

It happened once. Can it happen again? It’s the stuff of really great TV shows: A few months ago, 14-year-old Julia Bluhm led a petition against Seventeen, a magazine whose audience is primarily young girls. She wanted editors at the magazine to adopt healthier Photoshopping habits and to use models that look more “realistic” to actual people. What happened next (hint: look at the picture above) has some wondering if Bluhm may have started a real trend. ShortFormBlog’s Sami Main analyzes the cultural impact of Bluhm’s simple idea with a wide reach. Read more after the jump.

Read More

13:24 // 1 year ago
July 6, 2012
Seventeen Magazine signs a “Body Peace Treaty” with its readers
Shop’s been dropped: Seventeen magazine’s editor-in-chief Anne Shoket, bowing to the pressures of fourteen-year-old Julia Bluhm’s 84,000-signature petition, agreed to stop photoshopping the girls featured in her magazine. The new “Body Peace Treaty” makes a pledge to diversity within the magazine regarding body shape, size and skin color. In an interview with NPR, Shocket assured listeners Photoshop would only be used to fix errant strands of hair or acne blemishes to “make you look like you would on your best possible day.” Excellent work, Julia. source
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Shop’s been dropped: Seventeen magazine’s editor-in-chief Anne Shoket, bowing to the pressures of fourteen-year-old Julia Bluhm’s 84,000-signature petition, agreed to stop photoshopping the girls featured in her magazine. The new “Body Peace Treaty” makes a pledge to diversity within the magazine regarding body shape, size and skin color. In an interview with NPR, Shocket assured listeners Photoshop would only be used to fix errant strands of hair or acne blemishes to “make you look like you would on your best possible day.” Excellent work, Julia. source

Follow ShortFormBlog: Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook

16:04 // 1 year ago
June 14, 2012
HuffPo’s new weekly iPad magazine, ”Huffington.”, just launched today. It’s a free download, though issues cost 99 cents a piece. Check it out if you ever wondered what HuffPo would be like with more in-depth stories and better design.

HuffPo’s new weekly iPad magazine, ”Huffington.”, just launched today. It’s a free download, though issues cost 99 cents a piece. Check it out if you ever wondered what HuffPo would be like with more in-depth stories and better design.

13:05 // 1 year ago
June 4, 2012
21:05 // 1 year ago
June 1, 2012
18:00 // 1 year ago
February 14, 2012

newsweek:

Welcome to our first edition of the Newsweek also-rans, a brand new nwk tumblr feature from our friends in the art department!

Here’s Dirk Barnett, Newsweek & The Daily Beast’s Creative Director:

Every week we produce anywhere from 10-20 different cover ideas until we settle on what works best or as the story develops, so at the end of each week we wind up with a proverbial wastebasket full of scrapped concepts. 

The week’s cover, “The Politics of Sex,” is a perfect example to kick this off. These directions are a combination of ideas generated in-house and commissions to various illustrators, designers, studios, ad agencies, etc. This week, we tapped the creative minds at ad agency Hill Holiday and the design studio Dress Code, as well as renowned book designer Rodrigo Corral. Take a look at what’s left on our cutting room floor this week. Enjoy!

Here’s the cover that made newsstands this week. Which of the also-rans is your favorite?

[Design credits, from top left: Dress Code, Dress Code, Hill Holiday, Hill Holiday, Hill Holiday, Rodrigo Corral, Rodrigo Corral]

Are these covers better than the one that actually ran? Admit the one with the condom flag (bottom right) is kind of amazing.

14:07 // 2 years ago