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July 8, 2012
10:34 // 2 years ago
July 6, 2012

Libyans make Americans look bad with potentially high electoral turnout

  • 80% approximate percentage of eligible Libyan voters registered to cast a ballot in Libya’s first democratic election since the 1960s
  • 36% percentage of the American electorate who failed to vote in the ‘08 elections; oh, and that was a record-breaking low source

» By ballot or by bullet: Threats of militia violence are the only thing expected to lower the Libyan voter turnout in their first major democratic move since Muammar Gadhafi was overthrown. In the U.S., meanwhile, voting restriction laws have been passed in over a dozen states, which might make 5 million eligible voters’ trips to the ballot box much harder this November.

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11:00 // 2 years ago
May 20, 2012
This is a sad day.
Dr Jim Swire, father of Lockerbie victim who believes Megrahi was innocent. (via newsflick)

A reminder that there are still lingering questions about this case lasting to this day. 
11:04 // 2 years ago
Convicted Lockerbie bomber Abdel Basset al-Megrahi dies at 60
He outlived the Libyan regime: In the late 1980s, al-Megrahi, the security chief for Libyan Arab Airlines, worked covertly for Libya’s Jamahiriya Security Organization, giving him knowledge of the weaknesses that many airliners have — which allowed him to know how to place a suitcase bomb on an airliner. That plane, Pan-Am flight 103, exploded, causing the deaths of 270 people over and around Lockerbie, Scotland — one of the worst terror attacks in history. While there is some question as to whether al-Megrahi was innocent (he was linked via forensic evidence after an international manhunt), he was convicted in the bombing, which also played a role in the eventual demise of Pan Am airlines. All that would be surprising on its own — but in 2009 came another surprise, when a Scottish court allowed al-Megrahi, suffering from terminal prostate cancer, to return home to Libya. He was expected to live three months. He lived almost three years — long enough to see the demise of the Gaddafi regime which he’ll forever be associated with. (photo by Manoocher Deghati/AFP/Getty Images)

Convicted Lockerbie bomber Abdel Basset al-Megrahi dies at 60

He outlived the Libyan regime: In the late 1980s, al-Megrahi, the security chief for Libyan Arab Airlines, worked covertly for Libya’s Jamahiriya Security Organization, giving him knowledge of the weaknesses that many airliners have — which allowed him to know how to place a suitcase bomb on an airliner. That plane, Pan-Am flight 103, exploded, causing the deaths of 270 people over and around Lockerbie, Scotland — one of the worst terror attacks in history. While there is some question as to whether al-Megrahi was innocent (he was linked via forensic evidence after an international manhunt), he was convicted in the bombing, which also played a role in the eventual demise of Pan Am airlines. All that would be surprising on its own — but in 2009 came another surprise, when a Scottish court allowed al-Megrahi, suffering from terminal prostate cancer, to return home to Libya. He was expected to live three months. He lived almost three years — long enough to see the demise of the Gaddafi regime which he’ll forever be associated with. (photo by Manoocher Deghati/AFP/Getty Images)

10:57 // 2 years ago
May 8, 2012

Uh, bad news guys: We have a missing missile problem in Libya

  • 15,000 freaking missiles just went *poof* source

» Those missiles could most definitely be in the wrong hands: After the downfall of the Gaddafi regime, the U.S. started up a $40 million missile recovery program to help get back some of these missiles — estimated to be 20,000 total — but have only managed to recover 5,000 of them. And there are rumblings that terror groups such as Nigeria’s Boko Haram could have some of these missiles, which (though fired from the shoulder) are big enough to, say, take down a plane. The “War on Terror” changes quickly, it seems.

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20:32 // 2 years ago
April 30, 2012
Former Libyan PM Shukri Ghanem found dead in Austrian river
Muammar Gaddafi’s former prime minister and oil minister was found floating in the Danube River, though no obvious signs of violence could be found. An autopsy will take place in the next few days, though it’s unknown if details regarding his death will be made public. Ghanem served as prime minister from 2003-2006, and as oil minister until last year. He defected last summer during the Libyan Revolution, and moved to Vienna to work as a consultant. (Photo via The Friday Times) source
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Muammar Gaddafi’s former prime minister and oil minister was found floating in the Danube River, though no obvious signs of violence could be found. An autopsy will take place in the next few days, though it’s unknown if details regarding his death will be made public. Ghanem served as prime minister from 2003-2006, and as oil minister until last year. He defected last summer during the Libyan Revolution, and moved to Vienna to work as a consultant. (Photo via The Friday Times) source

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15:03 // 2 years ago
April 25, 2012
13:58 // 2 years ago
February 14, 2012

Americans are beginning to sour on foreign intervention

  • 63% of Americans believed, in March 2011, that the US had no obligation to intervene in Libya
  • 73% of Americans believe, as of today, that the US has no obligation to intervene in Syria source
22:01 // 2 years ago
February 12, 2012
They told us that they planned to shift control of a few prisons this week, but it has not happened. … The government has to take over the prisons one by one by negotiating with the people who run it. It is not uniformly or automatically done.
A United Nations official, based in Tripoli • Discussing the situation with Libyan prisons, where conditions in the post-Gaddafi era have gotten quite bad, as rebel-sympathizing prison runners are using the prisons to exact revenge on people who supported the former Libyan leader during the revolution. Prison owners have tried to tell a different story, but some humanitarian groups have stopped helping Libyan prisons due to torture allegations. The United Nations has complained about the problem for months, noting that the government should be in control of the prisons to ensure fair treatment, not former rebels. Roughly 8,500 detainees, many sub-Saharan Africans suspected of fighting for Gaddafi, are being held in detention centers nationwide. source (viafollow)
10:45 // 2 years ago
December 28, 2011

expressafterdeadline:

Year-end photos: What made it in, and what didn’t

In the Express newsroom, our year-end photo package always leads to a bit of debate — what should get in, and what shouldn’t? What tells the story of the year at large, and what gets pushed aside due to tough choices and limited room? Whittling it down to six pages and a cover is tough work. Here are a few shots that we put in the package — you might recognize them from covers and stories throughout the year — and a few that just missed the cut. (Hop over to today’s paper to see each of the ones that made the cut.)

  1. Aiming for Change A rebel fighter cheers as a rocket races toward Moammar Gadhafi loyalists amid fighting west of Ajdabiya, Libya, on April 14. NATO provided air support for the revolutionaries during the nearly nine-month conflict to oust Gadhafi. Perhaps the strongest photo we ran this year, it was one of the last photos taken by Chris Hondros, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who died in Libya on April 20. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
  2. Norway Grapples With Devastating Loss: Despite this being perhaps the most iconic image of the Norway shootings, several editors didn’t immediately recognize what news event it was from. It seemed like a generic mourning shot lacking the resonance we were looking for. We ended up using an image from Hurricane Irene in N.C., something with much more impact for local readers. (Photo by Emilio Morenatti/AP)
  3. Protests Hit a Nerve: University of California, Davis, police Lt. John Pike uses pepper spray Nov. 18 on seated Occupy UC Davis protesters. Spurred by the Canadian activist group Adbusters to protest economic inequality, the Occupy Wall Street movement began Sept. 17 in New York City and quickly spread to cities around the world. (Photo by Wayne Tilcock/The Enterprise/AP)
  4. The Situation Room: We love this shot, of course. But, while it is THE historic situation room shot from Osama bin Laden’s death, it didn’t work well on the page in the mix of photos we had. Too hard to read at a small size and too busy and overwhelming in a larger spot. In the end, the package worked best by playing better images bigger (Sept. 11 mourning, for example!) and nixing the sit room shot. (Photo by Pete Souza/The White House/AP)
  5. Collateral Damage: A limestone angel dislodged by an Aug. 23 earthquake lies shattered on the roof of the National Cathedral in Northeast D.C. The magnitude-5.8 earthquake jolted much of the Mid-Atlantic region. Officials say the cathedral sustained about $25 million worth of damage, which could take up to 10 years to repair. (Photo by J. Scott Applewhite/AP) 
  6. Meme on ice: We discovered that we had overlooked this local photo about five   minutes after deadline. This was probably the picture we gushed about most when it happened (The gelato from the place across the street! In the snow! Whilst wearing a   pink shirt!). Drat! Three lovely photo spreads ruined without the Ice Cream Cone Man. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/TWP) 

Think we made the right picks?

The Washington Post Express makes a big deal out of its year-end photo packages. And this year was no exception — the paper ran six pages and the cover. Here are a few of the shots we ran, and a few others we passed on. — Ernie @ SFB

10:31 // 2 years ago