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January 16, 2013
15:03 // 1 year ago
December 23, 2012

Microsoft’s bad news? Windows 8 computers are selling slowly

  • 13% the drop in sales of Windows computers between the last week of October and the first week in December, compared to sales from one year ago. This is a bad sign for Microsoft, which launched Windows 8 during that time frame, and one blamed on various factors, including the bold design changes in the OS and the rise of the mobile market, which could be slowing down demand for desktops. The Surface, which was only for sale in Microsoft stores during that period, was likely a non-factor. source
19:16 // 1 year ago
October 30, 2012
shortformblog:

Let’s be honest with ourselves, residents of DC: We’re kind of jerks to one another when the power’s out in our homes and we have to go to coffee shops just to charge our laptops and cell phones. (It’s understandable, just sort of weirdly cutthroat.) I’ve personally seen this dynamic at half a dozen places today, including a Barnes & Noble full of people laying on the floor trying to keep their laptops charged while their power was out. It doesn’t have to be like this though. Want to make friends today? Bring a power strip with you to Panera. (photo by edkohler) — Ernie @ SFB

We wrote this a few months ago due to another power outage, but this seems pretty relevant today — especially for those in NYC trying to latch onto some form of wifi.

shortformblog:

Let’s be honest with ourselves, residents of DC: We’re kind of jerks to one another when the power’s out in our homes and we have to go to coffee shops just to charge our laptops and cell phones. (It’s understandable, just sort of weirdly cutthroat.) I’ve personally seen this dynamic at half a dozen places today, including a Barnes & Noble full of people laying on the floor trying to keep their laptops charged while their power was out. It doesn’t have to be like this though. Want to make friends today? Bring a power strip with you to Panera. (photo by edkohler— Ernie @ SFB

We wrote this a few months ago due to another power outage, but this seems pretty relevant today — especially for those in NYC trying to latch onto some form of wifi.

13:48 // 1 year ago
September 26, 2012
12:44 // 1 year ago
September 9, 2012
RIP Bill Moggridge: Developer of the Grid Compass, one of the earliest laptops
That’s astronaut John Creighton with Bill’s invention. In 1982, Bill Moggridge developed the industrial design for one of the first computers with the closeable notebook shape that’s common on most portable computers today. Moggridge’s client, GRiD Systems Corporation, was so ahead of the game that they actually owned the patent for the clamshell-style laptop. “In terms of the industrial design of the enclosure, Moggridge was instrumental in proposing that,” said Alex Bochannek of the Computer History Museum. “He came up with that particular form factor.” Being first meant it was extremely expensive, though — at the time of its release in 1982, it cost $8,150 — but it found a home with the U.S. government, particularly NASA. Moggridge’s career didn’t end there, however — he was one of the co-founders of IDEO, an international design company that’s still going strong to this day. Moggridge was 69. (photo via NASA)

RIP Bill Moggridge: Developer of the Grid Compass, one of the earliest laptops

That’s astronaut John Creighton with Bill’s invention. In 1982, Bill Moggridge developed the industrial design for one of the first computers with the closeable notebook shape that’s common on most portable computers today. Moggridge’s client, GRiD Systems Corporation, was so ahead of the game that they actually owned the patent for the clamshell-style laptop. “In terms of the industrial design of the enclosure, Moggridge was instrumental in proposing that,” said Alex Bochannek of the Computer History Museum. “He came up with that particular form factor.” Being first meant it was extremely expensive, though — at the time of its release in 1982, it cost $8,150 — but it found a home with the U.S. government, particularly NASA. Moggridge’s career didn’t end there, however — he was one of the co-founders of IDEO, an international design company that’s still going strong to this day. Moggridge was 69. (photo via NASA)

22:16 // 1 year ago
June 30, 2012
Let’s be honest with ourselves, residents of DC: We’re kind of jerks to one another when the power’s out in our homes and we have to go to coffee shops just to charge our laptops and cell phones. (It’s understandable, just sort of weirdly cutthroat.) I’ve personally seen this dynamic at half a dozen places today, including a Barnes & Noble full of people laying on the floor trying to keep their laptops charged while their power was out. It doesn’t have to be like this though. Want to make friends today? Bring a power strip with you to Panera. (photo by edkohler) — Ernie @ SFB

Let’s be honest with ourselves, residents of DC: We’re kind of jerks to one another when the power’s out in our homes and we have to go to coffee shops just to charge our laptops and cell phones. (It’s understandable, just sort of weirdly cutthroat.) I’ve personally seen this dynamic at half a dozen places today, including a Barnes & Noble full of people laying on the floor trying to keep their laptops charged while their power was out. It doesn’t have to be like this though. Want to make friends today? Bring a power strip with you to Panera. (photo by edkohler— Ernie @ SFB

19:34 // 2 years ago
April 15, 2012

How Atari — Atari! — predicted the laptop, iPad and Wikipedia 30 years ago

Bob Stein, who worked at Encyclopedia Britannica as well as Atari during its glory days, worked with Alan Kay, along with Disney animator Glenn Keane, on a series of illustrations back in 1982 showing off his idea for an “Intelligent Encyclopedia,” one which can tell you about earthquakes, stocks, and history, all within the palm of your hand. Laptops didn’t look like this for nearly a decade, and the ideas behind the encyclopedia eventually showed up on Wikipedia two decades later. But, really, what Atari was working on was essentially an iPad with a keyboard. “The most interesting thing for me today about these images is that although we foresaw that people would be accessing information wirelessly (notice the little antenna on the device in the “tide pool” image),” Stein notes, “we completely missed the most important aspect of the network — that it was going to connect people to other people.” Stein’s ideas aren’t a total loss — the guy did essentially invent the multimedia CD-ROM and co-founded The Criterion Collection — but just think if he actually implemented this idea.

11:45 // 2 years ago
July 27, 2011

Laptop broken? Enroll in an Owensboro, KY public school

  • FREE Macbooks for kids in Kentucky! source

» We were generally supportive of the 2009 stimulus package, but aspects of it are starting to seem a bit questionable, to say the least. Case in point: 2,200 students and staff in the town of Owensboro, Kentucky will soon be enjoying a free Macbook Air, courtesy of the Recovery and Reinvestment Act. While we’re all for providing students with the technical competency needed to compete in the 21st-century global economy, you don’t really need to give everyone a Macbook Air to do that. The cheapest Air is $999; if we assume, for the sake of argument, that Apple gave Owensboro a 50% bulk discount, that’s still over a million dollars of federal money being spent so kids can have free laptops. Opponents of “wasteful government spending,” your Exhibit A is right here.

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21:57 // 3 years ago
May 11, 2011

College students are gonna love this Google ChromeOS news

  • $20 per month for students to get a ChromeOS notebook?!? source

» Wow, that would certainly change things: Could you imagine a kit-and-kaboodle deal like that, how it’d tear apart the hardware-centric power structure of the PC industry? This is the kind of method social media companies use to go after a growing demographic — but not generally hardware-makers. If Google’s deal is true, that’s $240 a year for a laptop which essentially works as a loss leader for Google. It’d also be an entryway into the business industry for the company, which could hand out dumbbooks like Google’s for super-cheap.

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1:42 // 3 years ago
March 2, 2011
If you have eyes, you may want to read about this new laptop
Sure, we’re all salivating over the new iPad 2 today, but in case you’re a Winboi in need of saliva-worthy exploits, check out this laptop right here. See that giant lump on the back of it? No, it’s not a Windows tumor, Macbois. Actually, it’s a device that tracks your eyesight so you can surf the Web without having to screw with a mouse. Reports suggest this eye-tracking device is very accurate (even if you’re wearing glasses), though it has to be calibrated for each user. There’s also a currently-unsightly camera below the display, though if given some time, it could go away. Would you use your eyes to Web-surf, or would you blink? And what happens if you’re a pirate? source
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Sure, we’re all salivating over the new iPad 2 today, but in case you’re a Winboi in need of saliva-worthy exploits, check out this laptop right here. See that giant lump on the back of it? No, it’s not a Windows tumor, Macbois. Actually, it’s a device that tracks your eyesight so you can surf the Web without having to screw with a mouse. Reports suggest this eye-tracking device is very accurate (even if you’re wearing glasses), though it has to be calibrated for each user. There’s also a currently-unsightly camera below the display, though if given some time, it could go away. Would you use your eyes to Web-surf, or would you blink? And what happens if you’re a pirate? source

Follow ShortFormBlog

20:32 // 3 years ago