The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

March 7, 2012
10:44 // 2 years ago
14:30 // 2 years ago
Our programs are Ugandan inspired and Ugandan led. As in they were created by Ugandans for Ugandans. Nobody is more aware of the dangers of the “White Man’s Burder” [sic] messiah complex than Invisible Children. Our programs actively seek to empower Ugandans to help themselves. Every. Single. Program.
Invisible Children’s John Rudolph Beaton has written a response to criticisms the group’s Kony 2012 campaign has faced, specifically from Visible Children. He’s clear though, that he’s not speaking for his group: "This is my own personal, response and does not reflect the views of any person or any organization besides myself."
16:02 // 2 years ago
March 8, 2012
Because we’re still getting messages about this (no need to send any more, we’re aware), here’s a link to our Kony 2012 coverage so far, including our think-piece on the matter. A lot of criticism of the Invisible Children movement has cropped up today, criticism which the movement itself has responded to. “Some organizations focus exclusively on documenting human rights abuses, some focus exclusively on international advocacy or awareness, and some focus exclusively on, on-the-ground development,” the group claims. “We do all three. At the same time. This comprehensive model is intentional and has shown to be very effective.”

Because we’re still getting messages about this (no need to send any more, we’re aware), here’s a link to our Kony 2012 coverage so far, including our think-piece on the matterA lot of criticism of the Invisible Children movement has cropped up today, criticism which the movement itself has responded to. “Some organizations focus exclusively on documenting human rights abuses, some focus exclusively on international advocacy or awareness, and some focus exclusively on, on-the-ground development,” the group claims. “We do all three. At the same time. This comprehensive model is intentional and has shown to be very effective.”

12:16 // 2 years ago
No one wants a boring documentary on Africa. Maybe we have to make it pop, and we have to make it cool. We view ourself as the Pixar of human rights stories.
"Kony 2012" director Jason Russell • Making a telling point in an interview with the New York Times about his video, which has faced popularity and scorn in equal measures. The success of the video — far beyond your average viral video — has pushed its spread far beyond the traditional activism video, but not without criticism. Should Pixar be an example for an activist movement?
23:03 // 2 years ago
March 9, 2012
16:55 // 2 years ago
March 13, 2012
Look at the staff page on our website to see how many Africans work with us. It’s not as if we’re all white guys from San Diego.
Invisible Children “Director of Ideology” Jedidiah Jenkins •  Giving GOOD one of the first interviews on behalf of the embattled organization since they initially posted a rebuttal to early criticisms on their website. During the interview, the GOOD reporter asked Jenkins what he would say directly to critics if  given the opportunity. “Our films are made for high school children. We make films that speak the language of kids,” he said, adding, “Our films weren’t made to be scrutinized by the Guardian.” source (viafollow)
21:14 // 2 years ago
March 14, 2012

An organization called African Youth Initiative Network screened the now-infamous KONY 2012 documentary for thousands of Northern Ugandan men, women, and children on Tuesday. While some were confused by the film’s narrative, many were angered by it’s portrayal of their country and near-celebrity status that it bestowed upon Joseph Kony. “If people in those countries care about us, they will not wear t-shirts with pictures of Joseph Kony for any reason,” said one attendee, adding, “that would celebrate our suffering.” source

Follow ShortFormBlog

19:55 // 2 years ago
March 16, 2012
"Kony 2012" director Jason Russell arrested after public breakdown
It’s bad, guys. He even showed up on TMZ. Russell, who has faced a ton of praise and criticism in recent weeks over his group’s successful attempt to make Joseph Kony famous, was detained Thursday for public drunkenness, masturbating in public and vandalizing cars on the streets of San Diego, the group’s American home base. Officials realized that he was having a bit of a breakdown and hospitalized him. “Jason Russell was unfortunately hospitalized yesterday suffering from exhaustion, dehydration, and malnutrition,” the CEO of Invisible Children, Ben Keesey, said in a statement. “He is now receiving medical care and is focused on getting better. The past two weeks have taken a severe emotional toll on all of us, Jason especially, and that toll manifested itself in an unfortunate incident yesterday.” In case anyone’s morbidly curious, we’ll let you head over to TMZ yourselves. No link necessary. source
Follow ShortFormBlog

It’s bad, guys. He even showed up on TMZ. Russell, who has faced a ton of praise and criticism in recent weeks over his group’s successful attempt to make Joseph Kony famous, was detained Thursday for public drunkenness, masturbating in public and vandalizing cars on the streets of San Diego, the group’s American home base. Officials realized that he was having a bit of a breakdown and hospitalized him. “Jason Russell was unfortunately hospitalized yesterday suffering from exhaustion, dehydration, and malnutrition,” the CEO of Invisible Children, Ben Keesey, said in a statement. “He is now receiving medical care and is focused on getting better. The past two weeks have taken a severe emotional toll on all of us, Jason especially, and that toll manifested itself in an unfortunate incident yesterday.” In case anyone’s morbidly curious, we’ll let you head over to TMZ yourselves. No link necessary. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

19:30 // 2 years ago