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March 22, 2012
Without the Internet and YouTube, [Joseph Kony’s] dastardly deeds would not resonate with politicians. When you get 100 million Americans looking at something, you will get our attention.
Sen. Lindsey Graham • On the effect Kony 2012 has had on lawmakers. Yesterday, over a third of the Senate co-sponsored a bill condemning Kony’s actions; now, Graham and other members of Congress are working on a “bounty bill” to help encourage the capture (or “disappearing,” shall we say) of Kony, the now-infamous Ugandan warlord. Graham’s bosom buddy, John McCain, echoed his colleague’s sentiments, saying that “if not ending up dead, [Kony] could end up in the International Criminal Court, and it’d be a wonderful thing.” Now, there’s been a lot of controversy surrounding Kony 2012 and its creators; however, regardless of what you think of the organization behind the effort, it’s inspiring that something as simple as a YouTube video can actually spur Congress into action. It’s also nice to see Democrats and Republicans agree on something for once.  source (viafollow)
19:06 // 2 years ago
March 17, 2012

Uganda’s PM responds to “false impression” of #Kony2012

In which Ugandan PM Amama Mbabazi takes the matter of responding to the alleged falsehoods of #Kony2012 into his own hands.

13:27 // 2 years ago
March 16, 2012

Not all of Invisible Children’s efforts were as slick as Kony 2012: For example, this 2006 clip, which is kinda like a reeeeeally bad episode of “Glee.”

23:36 // 2 years ago
"Kony 2012" director Jason Russell arrested after public breakdown
It’s bad, guys. He even showed up on TMZ. Russell, who has faced a ton of praise and criticism in recent weeks over his group’s successful attempt to make Joseph Kony famous, was detained Thursday for public drunkenness, masturbating in public and vandalizing cars on the streets of San Diego, the group’s American home base. Officials realized that he was having a bit of a breakdown and hospitalized him. “Jason Russell was unfortunately hospitalized yesterday suffering from exhaustion, dehydration, and malnutrition,” the CEO of Invisible Children, Ben Keesey, said in a statement. “He is now receiving medical care and is focused on getting better. The past two weeks have taken a severe emotional toll on all of us, Jason especially, and that toll manifested itself in an unfortunate incident yesterday.” In case anyone’s morbidly curious, we’ll let you head over to TMZ yourselves. No link necessary. source
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It’s bad, guys. He even showed up on TMZ. Russell, who has faced a ton of praise and criticism in recent weeks over his group’s successful attempt to make Joseph Kony famous, was detained Thursday for public drunkenness, masturbating in public and vandalizing cars on the streets of San Diego, the group’s American home base. Officials realized that he was having a bit of a breakdown and hospitalized him. “Jason Russell was unfortunately hospitalized yesterday suffering from exhaustion, dehydration, and malnutrition,” the CEO of Invisible Children, Ben Keesey, said in a statement. “He is now receiving medical care and is focused on getting better. The past two weeks have taken a severe emotional toll on all of us, Jason especially, and that toll manifested itself in an unfortunate incident yesterday.” In case anyone’s morbidly curious, we’ll let you head over to TMZ yourselves. No link necessary. source

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19:30 // 2 years ago
March 8, 2012
No one wants a boring documentary on Africa. Maybe we have to make it pop, and we have to make it cool. We view ourself as the Pixar of human rights stories.
"Kony 2012" director Jason Russell • Making a telling point in an interview with the New York Times about his video, which has faced popularity and scorn in equal measures. The success of the video — far beyond your average viral video — has pushed its spread far beyond the traditional activism video, but not without criticism. Should Pixar be an example for an activist movement?
23:03 // 2 years ago
Because we’re still getting messages about this (no need to send any more, we’re aware), here’s a link to our Kony 2012 coverage so far, including our think-piece on the matter. A lot of criticism of the Invisible Children movement has cropped up today, criticism which the movement itself has responded to. “Some organizations focus exclusively on documenting human rights abuses, some focus exclusively on international advocacy or awareness, and some focus exclusively on, on-the-ground development,” the group claims. “We do all three. At the same time. This comprehensive model is intentional and has shown to be very effective.”

Because we’re still getting messages about this (no need to send any more, we’re aware), here’s a link to our Kony 2012 coverage so far, including our think-piece on the matterA lot of criticism of the Invisible Children movement has cropped up today, criticism which the movement itself has responded to. “Some organizations focus exclusively on documenting human rights abuses, some focus exclusively on international advocacy or awareness, and some focus exclusively on, on-the-ground development,” the group claims. “We do all three. At the same time. This comprehensive model is intentional and has shown to be very effective.”

12:16 // 2 years ago
March 7, 2012
Our programs are Ugandan inspired and Ugandan led. As in they were created by Ugandans for Ugandans. Nobody is more aware of the dangers of the “White Man’s Burder” [sic] messiah complex than Invisible Children. Our programs actively seek to empower Ugandans to help themselves. Every. Single. Program.
Invisible Children’s John Rudolph Beaton has written a response to criticisms the group’s Kony 2012 campaign has faced, specifically from Visible Children. He’s clear though, that he’s not speaking for his group: "This is my own personal, response and does not reflect the views of any person or any organization besides myself."
16:02 // 2 years ago
14:30 // 2 years ago
10:44 // 2 years ago