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April 17, 2014
When I learned that the man accused of shooting innocent bystanders Sunday at a Jewish community center and Jewish retirement home in Overland Park, Kan., was a former Klansman named Glenn Miller, I shuddered. Thirty-three years ago, when I was an undergraduate at Duke University, I read a small item in the Raleigh News & Observer that mentioned Miller, then the grand dragon of the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Miller, it turns out, ran a paramilitary training camp in rural North Carolina.

I interviewed the accused Kansas gunman 33 years ago. He was hateful then, too. (via washingtonpost)

At the time, I didn’t think these sorts of things still happened in the United States. I was wrong.”

(via washingtonpost)

22:06 // 1 week ago
September 2, 2013
Today in weird get-togethers: In Casper, Wyoming over the weekend, leaders from regional chapters of the NAACP and the KKK got together to hash out some concerns regarding violence against black men in the region—believed to be the first meeting of its kind between the two groups anywhere. Security was high, for obvious reasons. (photo by Alan Rogers/Casper Star-Tribune)

Today in weird get-togethers: In Casper, Wyoming over the weekend, leaders from regional chapters of the NAACP and the KKK got together to hash out some concerns regarding violence against black men in the region—believed to be the first meeting of its kind between the two groups anywhere. Security was high, for obvious reasons. (photo by Alan Rogers/Casper Star-Tribune)

21:29 // 7 months ago
June 14, 2012
The law is pretty clear you may not deny participation in a program like this – that is run by the state – based on the mission and the message of the organization. It’s a free speech issue.
ACLU of Georgia Executive Director Debbie Seagraves • In a statement, confirming that the local chapter of the ACLU was researching the facts behind the Ku Klux Klan’s recently denied attempt to adopt a highway in the northern part of the state. She went on to note that, based on comments made by authorities when the decision was announced, it seemed that “the decision makers of the state thought that this was OK: it’s viewpoint discrimination.” So, who is in the right on this one? source (viafollow)
16:03 // 1 year ago
June 13, 2012
The impact of erecting a sign naming an organization which has a long-rooted history of civil disturbance would cause a significant public concern. Impacts include safety of the traveling public, potential social unrest, driver distraction or interference with the flow of traffic.
Georgia Department of Transportation commissioner Keith Golden • In a letter to a Georgia DOT secretary citing why they chose not to allow a local KKK chapter to “adopt” a highway stretch in the northern part of the state. Oh, there were other reasons too — the area, with its 65mph speed limit, would’ve been an unsafe place to for KKK members to work. But here’s the kicker — the KKK chapter, which says they’re “not racists” and are doing this to “keep the mountains beautiful,” has said they plan to get legal help from the American Civil Liberties Union if their application was denied. Can you get more ironic?
11:04 // 1 year ago
April 25, 2011

Republicans in Mississippi ambivalent about outcome of Civil War

  • 38% of Mississippi GOPers wish the South had won source

» There’s more: If you include the 41% that’s undecided, you get a whopping 79% of Mississippi Republicans who aren’t quite ready to throw their support behind Abraham Lincoln circa 1861. Also, 9% of African Americans in the state aren’t sure whether they like the NAACP more than the KKK; surely, this is the result of a typo, or some sort of methodological error, or perhaps a psychoactive pollutant in the drinking water. Oh well; at least 54% of the state agrees that interracial marriage shouldn’t be illegal. That’s right, a whole 54%!

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22:56 // 3 years ago
April 18, 2011
16:24 // 3 years ago