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January 11, 2013
breakingnews:

Saudi Arabia’s king appoints women to advisory council for 1st time
Bloomberg News: King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia has appointed female members to the Consultative Council for the first time, naming 30 women to the 150-member advisory body.The appointments, reported by the official Saudi Press Agency, came after Abdullah issued a decree requiring at least 20 percent of members should be women. It says they must observe Islamic law and be properly covered, and will enjoy full rights in the council, have a separate entrance to the chamber and sit in a special section apart from men.
Photo:  King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud of Saudi Arabia (Hassan Ammar / AP, file)

This is a huge step for that region. Curious to see where things go from here.

breakingnews:

Saudi Arabia’s king appoints women to advisory council for 1st time

Bloomberg News: King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia has appointed female members to the Consultative Council for the first time, naming 30 women to the 150-member advisory body.

The appointments, reported by the official Saudi Press Agency, came after Abdullah issued a decree requiring at least 20 percent of members should be women. It says they must observe Islamic law and be properly covered, and will enjoy full rights in the council, have a separate entrance to the chamber and sit in a special section apart from men.

Photo: King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud of Saudi Arabia (Hassan Ammar / AP, file)

This is a huge step for that region. Curious to see where things go from here.

(via newsflick)

9:21 // 1 year ago
June 16, 2012
8:58 // 2 years ago
November 15, 2011

An “expiration date”: Here’s a look at an interview recently conducted with Jordan’s King Abdullah, who speaks in understandably pessimistic terms about the nature of the Bashar al-Assad government in Syria. While predicting that the use of violence against his own citizens meant that Assad could not maintain power unchallenged, he also expressed concern as to who would lead Syria afterwards — a member of the same regime doing little good. This comes at a time of great violence in Syria; just yesterday between fifty and seventy-one people were killed. source

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14:18 // 2 years ago
November 14, 2011
11:29 // 2 years ago
September 25, 2011
10:37 // 2 years ago
August 8, 2011
Any sane Arab, Muslim or anyone else knows that this has nothing to do with religion, or ethics or morals; spilling the blood of the innocent for any reasons or pretext leads to no path to…hope.
Saudi King Abdullah • Denouncing the Syrian government’s violent crackdown on anti-government protests. Abdullah’s denunciation is politically significant, given his significance in the Arab world, and it comes on the heels of a similar condemnation from the Arab League. However, it’s worth noting that last March, Abdullah provided military support to the Bahrainian government to help it suppress on its own anti-government protests, so for him to now suddenly condemn counter-revolutionary government crackdowns seems just a tad insincere. source (viafollow)
8:29 // 3 years ago

Arab League, Saudi King denounce Syrian violence

  • 200 Syrian tanks rolled into the city of Deir el-Zour on Sunday, accompanied by soldiers and armored cars
  • 50+ people were killed in the assault, which took place during the dawn call to prayer  source

» For the first time, the Arab League has condemned the al-Assad regime’s violent assaults on the protesters, and Saudi Arabia has withdrawn its ambassador to Syria. Saudi King Abdullah strongly denounced the violence, calling for “an end to the death machine and bloodshed.”

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4:51 // 3 years ago
February 1, 2011
I wouldn’t see it as a sign of liberalisation. With his previous premiership, he talked the talk of reform but little actually happened.
London’s City University Professor of Middle East policy studies Rosemary Hollis • Revealing about Jordan what’s probably obvious from the fact that a previous prime minister (Marouf Bakhit) was appointed to replace the current one (Samir Rifai): It’s likely an act and probably won’t have any real effect on the leadership of the country. “He’s someone who would be seen as a safe pair of hands,” she noted. To be clear, that’s a safe pair of hands for King Abdullah. source (viafollow)
10:38 // 3 years ago
Jordan’s new Prime Minister, Maruf Bakhit, an old hat at this job: Meet Jordan’s new Prime Minister, Maruf Bakhit. Look familiar? He should. He was Prime Minister from 2005 to 2007. Talk about change you can believe in. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Jordan’s new Prime Minister, Maruf Bakhit, an old hat at this job: Meet Jordan’s new Prime Minister, Maruf Bakhit. Look familiar? He should. He was Prime Minister from 2005 to 2007. Talk about change you can believe in. source

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8:28 // 3 years ago
January 29, 2011

What do Egypt’s neighbors have to say about the protests?

  • saudis Saudi King Abdullah called Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak to say this: “No Arab and Muslim human being can bear that some infiltrators, in the name of freedom of expression, have infiltrated into the brotherly people of Egypt.” So, he’s totally on Mubarak’s side still.
  • palestinians Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas called Mubarak and ”affirmed his solidarity with Egypt and and his commitment to is its security and stability.” Thats’s not as direct as the Saudis, but still clearly favoring Mubarak. source
10:09 // 3 years ago