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November 4, 2013
I’m gratified by my 14-month partnership with the Guardian and am particularly proud of what we achieved together over the last five months. Reporting the NSA story has never been easy, but it’s always been invigorating and fulfilling. It’s exactly why one goes into journalism and, in my view, is what journalism at its crux is about. That doesn’t mean that the journalists and editors who have worked on this story have instantly agreed on every last choice we faced, but it does mean that, on the whole, I leave with high regard for the courage and integrity of the people with whom I’ve worked and pride in the way we’ve reported this story.
Glenn Greenwald says goodbye to The Guardian Thursday. Having been there for only 14 months, he heads over to a new endeavor with a pre-launch blog here. I, myself, am very excited to see how this will all end up. Also like how Greenwald ended his column with a call to action, “I hope everyone who believes in basic press freedoms will defend those journalistic outlets when they are under attack – all of them – regardless of how much one likes or does not like them.”
12:00 // 8 months ago
November 2, 2013
And [fallout from the book] will hit Christie first. Halperin and Heilemann make abundant use of a vice-presidential vetting file dropped into their hands by someone in Romney’s orbit to illuminate secrets about the governor. Delivering the documents to the authors was a stunning breach of political decorum that can only be read as a giant middle finger at Christie and his aides.

Review: ‘Double Down,’ on the 2012 election, by Mark Halperin and John Heilemann. The book comes out Nov. 5. (via andrewgraham)

I will obviously buy and read this book, but just further proof that mark halperin has an air of dick about him, the UK kindle edition costs £17.99! FFS

(via waitingonoblivion)

"It’s a book that will launch a thousand listicles."

(via waitingonoblivion)

18:27 // 8 months ago
15:45 // 8 months ago
October 30, 2013
» SFB says: OK, I know Virginia politics are heated and Terry McAuliffe is going to crush Ken Cuccinelli in the general election, and the AP story (repeated in the very last line of the piece you cite, specifically credited to Republican sources) was the GOP’s attempt at an October surprise—an October surprise which didn’t hold up to even modest scrutiny. Still, I’m gonna stop you right there. Prosecuting journalists (let alone firing them) for honest errors is stupid, and decisions on job status shouldn’t be strictly decided by witch hunts. Now, could he have reported this story better? Yes. But most journalists I know aren’t conniving jerks. And even if they were, since when do we prosecute journalists for errors in stories? That’s not how this country works. — Ernie @ SFB

» SFB says: OK, I know Virginia politics are heated and Terry McAuliffe is going to crush Ken Cuccinelli in the general election, and the AP story (repeated in the very last line of the piece you cite, specifically credited to Republican sources) was the GOP’s attempt at an October surprise—an October surprise which didn’t hold up to even modest scrutiny. Still, I’m gonna stop you right there. Prosecuting journalists (let alone firing them) for honest errors is stupid, and decisions on job status shouldn’t be strictly decided by witch hunts. Now, could he have reported this story better? Yes. But most journalists I know aren’t conniving jerks. And even if they were, since when do we prosecute journalists for errors in stories? That’s not how this country works. — Ernie @ SFB

11:49 // 9 months ago
October 29, 2013

Major job cuts announced by Thomson Reuters

  • 3,000 jobs will be cut by Thomson Reuters, primarily from the company’s Finance & Risk divisions, as part of a plan to try and regain some market share from Bloomberg LP. The company is also launching a $1 billion share buyback program soon, but will have to spend roughly $350 million to speed-up its cost-saving and job-cutting plans. source
17:06 // 9 months ago
October 26, 2013
13:10 // 9 months ago
October 23, 2013
18:30 // 9 months ago
October 19, 2013
Pretty much every solution we have seen for investigative reporting over the last five years has been about non-profits. The argument has been that private money will not fund investigative reporting, so philanthropy has to step in.
The Center for Investigative Reporting’s Andrew Donohue • Discussing the current status of investigative journalism. Donohue’s point is taken into sharp relief by Pierre Omidyar’s decision to fund Glenn Greenwald’s journalism startup for $250 million—a sum that instantly puts the paper in the league of The Washington Post, a product that the eBay founder almost bought himself before Jeff Bezos swooped in. The Guardian, where Greenwald has worked in recent years, has a great profile on Omidyar.
22:33 // 9 months ago
October 18, 2013
0:47 // 9 months ago
October 14, 2013
The attacks against the Guardian by both the government and representatives of the British press are unacceptable. What the Guardian is doing is both brave and important for our democracies. We fully support the paper.
Dagens Nyheter (Sweden) editor-in-chief Peter Wolodarski says on The Guardian’s work in recent events, along with other journalists and editors of international papers. 
11:30 // 9 months ago