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March 5, 2014
When a journalist disagrees with the editorial position of his or her organization, the usual course of action is to address those grievances with the editor, and, if they cannot be resolved, to quit like a professional. But when someone makes a big public show of a personal decision, it is nothing more than a self-promotional stunt.

RT reacts to Liz Wahl’s resignation

Welp; they’re not so happy.

22:32 // 4 months ago
February 27, 2014
thehedrick:

Hey everyone, no big deal or anything but I am now a contributing writer for The New York Times!!!!
Read the piece here

Great to see my pal Mike Hedrick get some NYT play. Viva thehedrick!

thehedrick:

Hey everyone, no big deal or anything but I am now a contributing writer for The New York Times!!!!

Read the piece here

Great to see my pal Mike Hedrick get some NYT play. Viva thehedrick!

(via thehedrick-deactivated20140507)

10:05 // 4 months ago
February 23, 2014
19:06 // 5 months ago
February 15, 2014

Forget everything you know about PBS and watch this video

Don’t let the pedigree fool you. PBS NewsHour correspondents know how to cut loose. Sometimes, they even produce mockumentaries. That’s the mission of Steve Goldbloom in his new PBS Digital Studies series “Everything But the News.” (Check out the trailer above.) Based on the behind-the-scenes subject matter of the new show—a visit to the Grindr offices, at-times-awkward interviews with celebrities and startup CEOs—this little series could do a bit to bump up PBS’ cool factor. (Not that it needs it. Any publicly-funded network responsible for the rise of Jim Lehrer is obviously awesome.)

The first episode of the new web series, over this way, is a nice little meta-commentary on the idea of PBS producing a quick-cut web series. (For one thing, Goldbloom’s at VidCon trying to steal pointers from Philip DeFranco.) For the news nerds out there, check out what Goldbloom told the Columbia Journalism Review.

13:09 // 5 months ago
February 14, 2014
8:52 // 5 months ago
February 11, 2014
18:26 // 5 months ago
February 3, 2014
Would releasing the news on an official channel — even without family notification — help clear up confusion and offer confirmation instead of allowing unconfirmed speculation to fester? And couldn’t it be argued that that would be more respectful of the families?
Phillips Media Training founder Brad Phillips • Discussing the way that some media outlets have failed to wait until a piece of news has been officially confirmed by the police—in some cases before even next of kin has been informed. That’s what happened yesterday when the Wall Street Journal reported on the death of Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Salon notes.
22:34 // 5 months ago
January 26, 2014
18:44 // 6 months ago
January 21, 2014

Politico: Why The Washington Post passed on Ezra Klein 

Politico has collected a few behind-the-scenes details on Ezra Klein’s surprise departure from The Washington Post, and what the well-known columnist has planned for his (and a few dozen others’) immediate future.

15:17 // 6 months ago
theatlantic:

The New York Times' Most Popular Story of 2013 Wasn't an Article

The New York Times has released its list of most-visited stories of 2013. As The Atlantic’s business editor Derek Thompson noted, they include four breaking news articles, one of which was a map; three health stories; a long narrative about poverty in New York; and two celebrity op-eds.
What interests me most about the list, though, is what’s at the number one spot: A news interactive made by Josh Katz and Wilson Andrews called “How Y’all, Youse, and You Guys Talk.” It was one of many stories that news organizations published about dialect this year—The Atlantic made a video!—all inspired by a North Carolina State University dialect quiz, but it was, for the Times, the most-visited thing.
Read more. [Image: The New York Times]


That’s cool and all, but the most interesting part? One of the creators of the graphic, Josh Katz, was an intern. An intern drew more traffic to the NYT than any of their writers. Think about that.

theatlantic:

The New York Times' Most Popular Story of 2013 Wasn't an Article

The New York Times has released its list of most-visited stories of 2013. As The Atlantic’s business editor Derek Thompson noted, they include four breaking news articles, one of which was a map; three health stories; a long narrative about poverty in New York; and two celebrity op-eds.

What interests me most about the list, though, is what’s at the number one spot: A news interactive made by Josh Katz and Wilson Andrews called “How Y’all, Youse, and You Guys Talk.” It was one of many stories that news organizations published about dialect this year—The Atlantic made a video!—all inspired by a North Carolina State University dialect quiz, but it was, for the Times, the most-visited thing.

Read more. [Image: The New York Times]

That’s cool and all, but the most interesting part? One of the creators of the graphic, Josh Katz, was an intern. An intern drew more traffic to the NYT than any of their writers. Think about that.

(via kenyatta)

10:40 // 6 months ago