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April 17, 2013

Hagel: US sending troops to Jordan

200 US troops are headed to Jordan, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced today. Their stated purpose is to help contain violence spilling over from the Syrian conflict, and according to Mohammad al-Momani, Jordan’s Minister of State for Information, they should be arriving “in the next few weeks.” This is a significant announcement, but we’re betting it’ll get buried under all the news today about gun control legislation and the Boston explosion. And that’s a shame. source

18:20 // 1 year ago
March 25, 2013
16:12 // 1 year ago
August 6, 2012
Syrian Prime Minister defects to Jordan
Drip, drip drip: Riyad Hijab, who was appointed Prime Minsister of Syria last June, has defected to Jordan and joined the opposition. Jordanian officials confirmed to Al-Jazeera that Hijab is with his family after having been smuggled across the border, and his spokesman claims that the defection had been planned for months in collusion with the Free Syrian Army. The Syrian government claims Hijab was fired, but either way, this is probably the highest-level defection President Bashar al-Assad has suffered so far, and a sign to many that his power is waning. source
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Drip, drip drip: Riyad Hijab, who was appointed Prime Minsister of Syria last June, has defected to Jordan and joined the opposition. Jordanian officials confirmed to Al-Jazeera that Hijab is with his family after having been smuggled across the border, and his spokesman claims that the defection had been planned for months in collusion with the Free Syrian Army. The Syrian government claims Hijab was fired, but either way, this is probably the highest-level defection President Bashar al-Assad has suffered so far, and a sign to many that his power is waning. source

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8:09 // 2 years ago
December 16, 2011
nationalpost:

Middle East on the brink of war: analysisAs Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad clings to power with the quiet backing of regional powers Iran and Russia, the Middle East may be sliding slowly into war.Squeezed between the rebellions of a bloody Arab Spring and growing fears of a possible military response to Iran’s growing nuclear threat, the region is becoming increasingly unstable.“I would be very surprised if it turned into a Russian-American war, but this could be a Mid-East war: Hezbollah, Hamas, Iran, Syria, Israel all having at each other,” said Jack Granatstein, military historian and senior research fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute.

Let’s hope that the region doesn’t get any more volatile than it already is. Do you think this analysis is spot-on?

nationalpost:

Middle East on the brink of war: analysis
As Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad clings to power with the quiet backing of regional powers Iran and Russia, the Middle East may be sliding slowly into war.

Squeezed between the rebellions of a bloody Arab Spring and growing fears of a possible military response to Iran’s growing nuclear threat, the region is becoming increasingly unstable.

“I would be very surprised if it turned into a Russian-American war, but this could be a Mid-East war: Hezbollah, Hamas, Iran, Syria, Israel all having at each other,” said Jack Granatstein, military historian and senior research fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute.

Let’s hope that the region doesn’t get any more volatile than it already is. Do you think this analysis is spot-on?

(via newsflick)

12:14 // 2 years ago
November 15, 2011

An “expiration date”: Here’s a look at an interview recently conducted with Jordan’s King Abdullah, who speaks in understandably pessimistic terms about the nature of the Bashar al-Assad government in Syria. While predicting that the use of violence against his own citizens meant that Assad could not maintain power unchallenged, he also expressed concern as to who would lead Syria afterwards — a member of the same regime doing little good. This comes at a time of great violence in Syria; just yesterday between fifty and seventy-one people were killed. source

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14:18 // 2 years ago
November 14, 2011
11:29 // 2 years ago
February 1, 2011
I wouldn’t see it as a sign of liberalisation. With his previous premiership, he talked the talk of reform but little actually happened.
London’s City University Professor of Middle East policy studies Rosemary Hollis • Revealing about Jordan what’s probably obvious from the fact that a previous prime minister (Marouf Bakhit) was appointed to replace the current one (Samir Rifai): It’s likely an act and probably won’t have any real effect on the leadership of the country. “He’s someone who would be seen as a safe pair of hands,” she noted. To be clear, that’s a safe pair of hands for King Abdullah. source (viafollow)
10:38 // 3 years ago
Jordan’s new Prime Minister, Maruf Bakhit, an old hat at this job: Meet Jordan’s new Prime Minister, Maruf Bakhit. Look familiar? He should. He was Prime Minister from 2005 to 2007. Talk about change you can believe in. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Jordan’s new Prime Minister, Maruf Bakhit, an old hat at this job: Meet Jordan’s new Prime Minister, Maruf Bakhit. Look familiar? He should. He was Prime Minister from 2005 to 2007. Talk about change you can believe in. source

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8:28 // 3 years ago