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March 11, 2011
Stuck on a bullet train outside of Tokyo with other MPs as everything has stopped due to the devastating earthquake.
Australian parliament member Stuart Robert • Revealing that the quake in Japan left him and three other members of the country’s parliament stuck on a train for four hours. The train is moving again but they were stuck for a while with limited communication.
5:59 // 3 years ago
The nuclear plants have been shut down but the cooling process for the reactor is not going as planned. We want everyone to remain calm. The IAEA will address the technical questions shortly.
Government spokesman for Japan on BBC (via kateoplis)
6:03 // 3 years ago
6:09 // 3 years ago

Tsunami may hit Californian shores in a couple of minutes

  • yes A tsunami warning has been issued to Northern California; Crescent City’s shores could be hit any minute now, with San Francisco and Santa Barbara following within the hour.
  • however…It’s probably not a big deal; the estimated wave heights in California are only around 4ft, and none of San Francisco has been evacuated. Still, steer clear of any beaches. source

» Two of us at ShortFormBlog live in California, and despite the fact that four feet waves don’t sound too intimidating, we’re going to resist the temptation (however minimal) to go to any of our beaches today. To our fellow Californians, please play it safe, because with Mother Nature, you never know. Officials say the north end of Monterey Bay is expected to be hit the hardest, and these things can continue for up to twelve hours after the initial hit.

Read ShortFormBlogFollow

10:31 // 3 years ago
cheatsheet:


This National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) image released on March 11, 2011 shows a model run from the Center for Tsunami Research at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory showing the expected wave heights of the tsunami as it travels across the Pacific basin.

(via)

It’d be beautiful if the reason the graphic was created wasn’t so tragic and disturbing.

cheatsheet:

This National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) image released on March 11, 2011 shows a model run from the Center for Tsunami Research at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory showing the expected wave heights of the tsunami as it travels across the Pacific basin.

(via)

It’d be beautiful if the reason the graphic was created wasn’t so tragic and disturbing.

12:30 // 3 years ago

Japan Earthquake, Tsunami Roundup

producermatthew:

Should have gone to bed at 10pm, wound up staying awake for nearly 12 hours covering the Japan earthquake. Heading for a nap, but not before a quick recap:

Also: The Short Form Blog has a “Summary Sandwich” full of Japan-related information and Pantsless Progressive has a list of other blogs providing content aggregation from the earthquake and tsunami. Additionally, the Google Person Finder is worth a mention.

Seriously. Lots of stuff here. ProducerMatthew is a lifer like us. He also managed to keep going six hours longer than we did.

12:56 // 3 years ago
kateoplis:

Proud to be part of Tumblr’s curated #Tsunami blog. Track it for the latest on Japan and around the world.

Wow, didn’t even know we were editing this until now. No matter! We’re totally up to the task! Will do our best to help!

kateoplis:

Proud to be part of Tumblr’s curated #Tsunami blog. Track it for the latest on Japan and around the world.

Wow, didn’t even know we were editing this until now. No matter! We’re totally up to the task! Will do our best to help!

13:02 // 3 years ago
Via BBC: Japanese authorities to release radioactive vapour to ease pressure at Fukushima #nuclear reactor, from AP #Japan

Via BBC: Japanese authorities to release radioactive vapour to ease pressure at Fukushima #nuclear reactor, from AP #Japan

13:59 // 3 years ago
Undoubtedly this is the largest natural disaster to have hit Japan in decades. We will still need to follow the news to see what the final toll is, as well as to learn whether there were parts of the preparedness system that did not work properly. The most important lesson to take away is that concerted and rationally formulated mitigation methods do work in limiting the damage, even from a disaster on this scale.
FrumForum writer Noah Kristula-Green • Offering some perspective on the Japan quake and tsunami from a disaster-preparedness angle. Kristula-Green, who lived in Japan during his elementary and high school years, recalls the constant earthquake and tsunami drills he had to do, just in case something happened. What’s interesting is the way he twists the whole issue on the U.S. — noting some recent arguments against such things. “There is a strain of libertarian and conservative thought which believes that public services and regulations are not just wasteful but are inherently incapable of ever being beneficial,” he writes. “The Japanese experience should lead to a reevaluation of that claim.” source (viafollow)
14:19 // 3 years ago
14:31 // 3 years ago