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November 23, 2013

Stuff you may have missed: November 23, 2013

Three members of Willie Nelson’s band were injured when their tour bus crashed. Nelson himself is OK; he has a separate bus, but he’s delayed his tour for understandable reasons.

Guy in NYC thought it was funny to play the “knockout game.” (It’s not.) Guy followed through with game. Guy got arrested. Expect the New York media to ruin the guy’s life.

China and Japan are fighting over a bunch of islands, and that fight just heated up a little more.

In Pakistan, they spent Saturday protesting drone strikes by the U.S. government.

The evidence isn’t looking good in chemist Annie Dookhan’s hands.

23:43 // 4 months ago
October 3, 2013
reuters:

Shortly after the mandatory evacuation was announced on television, Fumio Okubo put on his best clothes and his daughter-in-law served up his favorite dinner. By morning, the 102-year-old was dead. He had hanged himself before dawn.
A rope knitted from plastic bags is certainly not a tanto knife. Nor was his death a dramatic one, with the public in attendance and blood all around but what an old farmer did that morning recalls the act of a samurai in ancient times – to die with honor. Okubo, who was born and lived his entire life between Iitate’s rice fields and cedar trees, wanted to die in his beautiful village, here and nowhere else.
For most people on Japan’s eastern coast – at least for those survivors who lost nobody and nothing – the true horror of the powerful earthquake and tsunami it triggered was over quickly. But for many unfortunate souls in otherwise prosperous Fukushima prefecture, March 11, 2011 was just the start of what for me is one of the most heart-rending stories I have ever covered outside the misery of the developing world.

Reuters photographer Damir Sagolj has posted a series of photos and observations from his recent time in Japan, speaking with former residents from Fukushima prefecture and the surrounding areas, to see what life is like for those forced to evacuate in the wake of the 2011 tsunami and nuclear meltdown.

reuters:

Shortly after the mandatory evacuation was announced on television, Fumio Okubo put on his best clothes and his daughter-in-law served up his favorite dinner. By morning, the 102-year-old was dead. He had hanged himself before dawn.

A rope knitted from plastic bags is certainly not a tanto knife. Nor was his death a dramatic one, with the public in attendance and blood all around but what an old farmer did that morning recalls the act of a samurai in ancient times – to die with honor. Okubo, who was born and lived his entire life between Iitate’s rice fields and cedar trees, wanted to die in his beautiful village, here and nowhere else.

For most people on Japan’s eastern coast – at least for those survivors who lost nobody and nothing – the true horror of the powerful earthquake and tsunami it triggered was over quickly. But for many unfortunate souls in otherwise prosperous Fukushima prefecture, March 11, 2011 was just the start of what for me is one of the most heart-rending stories I have ever covered outside the misery of the developing world.

Reuters photographer Damir Sagolj has posted a series of photos and observations from his recent time in Japan, speaking with former residents from Fukushima prefecture and the surrounding areas, to see what life is like for those forced to evacuate in the wake of the 2011 tsunami and nuclear meltdown.

19:52 // 6 months ago
September 7, 2013
olympics:

Tokyo reacts after being elected as 2020 Olympic Games Host City.

The Olympics will return to Japan in 2020, for the first time since the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano. This time Tokyo will play host, having beat out the Turkish capitol of Istanbul in a run-off, despite concerns in recent days that the IOC would shirk Tokyo amid concerns about the ongoing (and we do stress ongoing) radioactivity leaks at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

olympics:

Tokyo reacts after being elected as 2020 Olympic Games Host City.

The Olympics will return to Japan in 2020, for the first time since the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano. This time Tokyo will play host, having beat out the Turkish capitol of Istanbul in a run-off, despite concerns in recent days that the IOC would shirk Tokyo amid concerns about the ongoing (and we do stress ongoing) radioactivity leaks at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

20:23 // 7 months ago
August 7, 2013

thisisfusion:

fastcompany:

Japan sent a tiny humanoid robot in space to keep an astronaut company.

Suddenly we realize that life could be much worse..

I would destroy this robot five minutes into the trip.

22:20 // 8 months ago
May 14, 2013
In the circumstances in which bullets are flying like rain and wind, the soldiers are running around at the risk of losing their lives. If you want them to have a rest in such a situation, a comfort women system is necessary. Anyone can understand that.
Toru Hashimoto, Mayor of Osaka, Japan • Claiming the necessity of Japan’s World War II-era so-called “comfort women,” a collection of 200,000 or so females (many Chinese, South Korean and Indonesian), forced into sex slavery for soldiers. Hashimoto’s statement of apparent sympathy with forced prostitution has been decried internationally, with Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei speaking in condemnation: "The conscription of sex slaves was a grave crime committed by the Japanese military. We are shocked and indignant at the Japanese politician’s remarks, as they flagrantly challenge historical justice." Hashimoto, age 43, is leader and co-founder of the nationalist Japan Restoration Party. source
19:46 // 11 months ago
March 27, 2013
This is what Namie-machi, a deserted town next to the Fukushima nuclear plant, looks like these days. Google’s Street View cars were able to get a first-hand look. (via TechCrunch)

This is what Namie-machi, a deserted town next to the Fukushima nuclear plant, looks like these days. Google’s Street View cars were able to get a first-hand look(via TechCrunch)

19:36 // 1 year ago
March 10, 2013
Two years after the earthquake that defined Japan’s recent history, the cleanup is well underway. And The Atlantic’s In Focus has the before-and-after shots, down to the exact angle. (side-by-side photos by Reuters/Kyodo)

Two years after the earthquake that defined Japan’s recent history, the cleanup is well underway. And The Atlantic’s In Focus has the before-and-after shots, down to the exact angle. (side-by-side photos by Reuters/Kyodo)

19:18 // 1 year ago
January 23, 2013
Heaven forbid if you are forced to live on when you want to die. I would wake up feeling increasingly bad knowing that [treatment] was all being paid for by the government. The problem won’t be solved unless you let them hurry up and die.
Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso • Offering very kind, loving advice for the elderly, who he considers a drain on resources. What an Aso!
9:58 // 1 year ago
January 7, 2013
19:40 // 1 year ago
September 18, 2012
1,700 acres. One batch of islands. Japan and China in battle of words over tiny patch of land
China and Japan aren’t on good terms right now: Last week, Japan purchased a set of islands from a private owner. But they weren’t any islands — the Senkaku Islands (known as the Diaoyu Islands in China) have long been a target of an ownership battle for decades. Now, the Chinese are really, really mad, with protesters using the anniversary of the events that led to Japan’s occupation of Manchuria as a pretext for more anger over the islands. Japan says it bought the islands in an effort to prevent them from being developed more fully by the mayor of Tokyo. More trouble than they’re worth? (photo by Eugene Hoshiko/AP)

1,700 acres. One batch of islands. Japan and China in battle of words over tiny patch of land

China and Japan aren’t on good terms right now: Last week, Japan purchased a set of islands from a private owner. But they weren’t any islands — the Senkaku Islands (known as the Diaoyu Islands in China) have long been a target of an ownership battle for decades. Now, the Chinese are really, really mad, with protesters using the anniversary of the events that led to Japan’s occupation of Manchuria as a pretext for more anger over the islands. Japan says it bought the islands in an effort to prevent them from being developed more fully by the mayor of Tokyo. More trouble than they’re worth? (photo by Eugene Hoshiko/AP)

9:29 // 1 year ago