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September 12, 2012

Face Lifts For Everybody: Apple has confirmed that a new version of iTunes is set to debut alongside iOS 6 on September 19. The iTunes redesign will feature a streamlined interface that is nearly mirrored on both the iPad and iPhone 5. (Photos via The Verge) source

Check out our continuing iPhone 5 event coverage here

14:10 // 1 year ago

Impressive Numbers For iTunes

  • 26M songs currently available for purchase in 63 countries
  • 435M iTunes accounts have been created to-date
  • 60% of all iTunes downloads originate on mobile devices source

Check out our continuing iPhone 5 event coverage here

14:06 // 1 year ago
September 4, 2012
Still, without any actual quotes from Willis or his agents, lawyers, etc, nobody would follow this up and just write a story, would they? Without any sources?
The Guardian’s Charles Arthur • Getting a little snarky about  a story which floated around the ether yesterday, in which it was claimed that Bruce Willis had planned on suing Apple for the right to leave his music in his inheritance for his children. One problem: The original cited story has little to go on, and was later confirmed by his wife Emma Heming-Willis to be false — but not until after a number of media outlets picked it up. It gets worse — Arthur infers that the writer of the original story might have read a story regarding “Estates and Wills” and mistook “Wills” for “Willis.” (Which, if the case, is downright embarrassing.) Good rumors die hard.
8:38 // 1 year ago
June 24, 2012

Winamp really whipped the llama’s ass, but AOL screwed it up

  • 4.2 megs the current size of the Mac version of old-school audio app Winamp, which was first released last year
  • 170 megs the current size of the Mac version of iTunes, Winamp’s biggest competitor which long ago ate its lunch source

» The first popular MP3 player: How did Winamp, which once boasted 60 million users, lose its lead? Simply put, AOL didn’t know what the heck to do with it after it bought it. Nullsoft, which AOL bought for $80-$100 million 1999, struggled to find its niche within the culture of AOL. AOL didn’t make it easy: They lumped them in with Spinner, another music product it bought at the same time, and kept bundling its apps (which its tech-savvy users, by the way, didn’t want) with the product. The company also had multiple run-ins with the app’s creator, Justin Frankel, who built multiple file-sharing networks while an employee of AOL, to the company’s bemusement. The result? Winamp was eventually left to die on the vine — until a couple years ago, when AOL realized it was sitting on a cash cow and started building it out again. It’s no iTunes, but it’s huge outside the U.S. And it just turned 15 years old. Happy anniversary, little MP3 player that could.

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20:58 // 1 year ago
June 13, 2012
0:52 // 1 year ago
March 14, 2012

Bashar al-Assad’s iTunes Playlist

cheatsheet:

Hackers got a hold of about 3,000 emails from account shared between Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad and his wife. One conversation chronicles the ruthless leader’s iTunes purchases, and let’s just say it’s an interesting mix. Without further ado, here’s a selection of songs purchased be the al-Assads. (Spotify playlist!) [h/t The Atlantic]

Blake Shelton - “God Gave Me You”

Right Said Fred - “Don’t Talk Just Kiss”

New Order - “Bizarre Love Triangle” 

The Cover Girls - “We Can’t Go Wrong” 

Leona Lewis - “Hurt”

Chris Brown - “Look at Me Now ft. Lil Wayne, Busta Rhymes”

LMFAO - “Sexy and I Know It” 

Right Said Fred and “Sexy and I Know It”: The songs a dictator gets down to. That said, “Bizarre Love Triangle” seems like a somewhat fitting description of Assad’s rule.

16:55 // 2 years ago
February 2, 2012
In reference to the prior post. (Also, follow me on Twitter if you like sarcasm. — Ernie @ SFB)

In reference to the prior post. (Also, follow me on Twitter if you like sarcasm. — Ernie @ SFB)

15:59 // 2 years ago
tylercoates:

bobbyfinger:

Canada’s like, “lol idiots.”

God bless the Canadians.

Kinda love the fact that L. Cohen is kicking butt on the charts. He’s in the top 10 everywhere but Australia. They probably don’t think they need him there. They have Nick Cave.

tylercoates:

bobbyfinger:

Canada’s like, “lol idiots.”

God bless the Canadians.

Kinda love the fact that L. Cohen is kicking butt on the charts. He’s in the top 10 everywhere but Australia. They probably don’t think they need him there. They have Nick Cave.

(via tylercoates-deactivated20130905)

15:54 // 2 years ago
September 6, 2011
You wouldn’t buy a car from a salesman who speaks in double-talk and hands you an unreadable contract. So why do we accept it from software companies?
Gregg Bernstein, the graduate student who transformed Apple’s confusing, 4,137-word iTunes TOS into a user-friendly masterpiece. See for yourself.  (via thedailyfeed)

(via thedailyfeed)

10:54 // 2 years ago
June 6, 2011
Bridging the piracy gap: Apple’s iCloud cleverly inverts Napster 1.0
We totally have to give Apple credit: The conceit around the iTunes portion of the iCloud service, while not exactly what we expected (it’s not Lala 2.0, sadly), manages to pull off an interesting trick — it creates a revenue model from a place where only piracy existed before. By upgrading your music’s quality and making it easily accessible from the cloud, it adds value inexpensively, and gets around a major sticking point for the major labels cleverly. And music industry officials see it as a positive. “It allows for revenue to be made off of pirated music in a way that consumers don’t feel that’s what they’re paying for, and that’s what I find fascinating about it,” noted Jeff Price, the CEO of TuneCore Inc., which helps independent artists sell their music online. Our music anywhere for $25 a year? Sure, we’ll pay that. source
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We totally have to give Apple credit: The conceit around the iTunes portion of the iCloud service, while not exactly what we expected (it’s not Lala 2.0, sadly), manages to pull off an interesting trick — it creates a revenue model from a place where only piracy existed before. By upgrading your music’s quality and making it easily accessible from the cloud, it adds value inexpensively, and gets around a major sticking point for the major labels cleverly. And music industry officials see it as a positive. “It allows for revenue to be made off of pirated music in a way that consumers don’t feel that’s what they’re paying for, and that’s what I find fascinating about it,” noted Jeff Price, the CEO of TuneCore Inc., which helps independent artists sell their music online. Our music anywhere for $25 a year? Sure, we’ll pay that. source

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21:29 // 2 years ago