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August 17, 2013
Violence outside. Violence soon to be inside: Moments after this photo, taken from inside a mosque in Cairo, was taken, stun grenades were thrown inside by military officials, and Islamists inside were forced out. Outside was another kind of violent scene, with Islamists and journalists alike facing danger from a violent crowd and military forces. Above, the military believed gunmen were firing from the mosque’s minaret, leading the tanks to return fire. Once soldiers got inside, more violent incidents—between the Morsi supporters and the military—took place. Much credit to the photographer, who risked his own safety to take a shot like this. (photo by Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)

Violence outside. Violence soon to be inside: Moments after this photo, taken from inside a mosque in Cairo, was taken, stun grenades were thrown inside by military officials, and Islamists inside were forced out. Outside was another kind of violent scene, with Islamists and journalists alike facing danger from a violent crowd and military forces. Above, the military believed gunmen were firing from the mosque’s minaret, leading the tanks to return fire. Once soldiers got inside, more violent incidents—between the Morsi supporters and the military—took place. Much credit to the photographer, who risked his own safety to take a shot like this. (photo by Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)

14:18 // 1 year ago
August 14, 2013
22:30 // 1 year ago
October 23, 2011

Looks like Libya's new government will rule with an Islamist hand. 

Mustafa Abdul-Jalil also told thousands of supporters at a ceremony on Sunday that Islamic Sharia law would be the “basic source” of legislation in the country and that existing laws that contradict the teachings of Islam would be nullified. In an address that set an Islamist tone for post-Gadhafi Libya, he said new banks would be set up to follow the Islamic banking system, which bans charging interest.

This is a big change from the days of Gaddafi’s green books and tribal rule. Will be interesting to see how the country evolves. Good luck to Libya as they plan their next steps as a country.

12:23 // 2 years ago

Not like Ben Ali’s rule: Tunisian elections draw massive crowds

  • then Elections during the rule of Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali generally drew a fairly small number of people, due to the fact that many believed that the results were pre-determined.
  • now Ten months after the end of Ben Ali’s regime, today’s elections have drawn huge numbers of people, with lines spreading far beyond the polling booths. source

» Not without some controversy: A notable Islamist figure in the country, Rachid Ghannouchi, was heckled as he came out of the voting booth today. “You are a terrorist and an assassin! Go back to London,” one shouted. Ghannouchi, the leader of the moderate Ennahda party, spent over two decades in Britain, exiled from the country where he was once imprisoned for his political views. He returned earlier this year, and his party is expected to do well today.

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12:12 // 2 years ago
October 22, 2011
Now I am happy that my son’s death has given the chance to get beyond fear and injustice. I’m an optimist, I wish success for my country.
Manoubia Bouazizi, mother of notable Tunisian self-immolator Mohamed Bouazizi • Discussing her son’s death and the spark for democracy it provided both in her own country but throughout northern Africa and the Middle East. Tomorrow Tunisia holds its first democratic election after the toppling of Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali ten months ago. (Ben Ali is now in exile in Saudi Arabia.) The Islamist Ennahda party, banned while Ben Ali was in power, is expected to garner the most votes, but not without controversy due to the long-encouraged secular culture in the country. It’ll be interesting to see what happens next. source (viafollow)
22:45 // 2 years ago
February 21, 2011
He is worse than his father. His claims about the establishment of Islamic emirates in the country is not true at all.
A local Muslim Brotherhood leader in Libya • Disputing the comments made by Mummar Gaddafi’s son, Saif, earlier this evening, which suggested that Islamists would cause civil war if the protests continued in the country. Meanwhile, Obama’s folks have been fishing for “clarification” what Saif meant. We can already tell you what he meant: He meant to impress us all with the way he inherited his crazy from his dad. source (viafollow)
0:33 // 3 years ago