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August 5, 2013
humanrightswatch:

Iran: A Human Rights Agenda for New President
Iran’s incoming government should take concrete steps to improve the country’s dreadful human rights record. Rouhani was sworn in as the seventh president of the Islamic Republic of Iran during an inauguration ceremony on August 4, 2013. Rouhani, who ran on a campaign of “hope” and “moderation” in the June 14 elections and received 50.7 percent of the votes, made numerous promises to the Iranian people regarding respect for individual rights. After officials announced the election results, many people came into the streets to celebrate, some calling for the release of political prisoners and chanting slogans in memory of those who died during the government’s crackdown following the disputed 2009 presidential election. [more]

Read on for Human Rights Watch’s take on where Iran should go next.

humanrightswatch:

Iran: A Human Rights Agenda for New President

Iran’s incoming government should take concrete steps to improve the country’s dreadful human rights record. 

Rouhani was sworn in as the seventh president of the Islamic Republic of Iran during an inauguration ceremony on August 4, 2013. Rouhani, who ran on a campaign of “hope” and “moderation” in the June 14 elections and received 50.7 percent of the votes, made numerous promises to the Iranian people regarding respect for individual rights. After officials announced the election results, many people came into the streets to celebrate, some calling for the release of political prisoners and chanting slogans in memory of those who died during the government’s crackdown following the disputed 2009 presidential election. [more]

Read on for Human Rights Watch’s take on where Iran should go next.

12:47 // 8 months ago
August 4, 2013
The government of hope and prudence will have moderation as a basis of its management for running the country. The government will fight corruption and discrimination.
Newly-elected Iranian President Hassan Rohani • Speaking during his oath of office on his plans for handling the post. Rohani is seen as much more moderate than his predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The country’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, gave Rohani his seal of approval. “I approve of the prudent approach,” Khamenei said. “We need to take action wisely and prudently.”
10:29 // 8 months ago
July 15, 2013
17:14 // 9 months ago
June 15, 2013
breakingnews:


Moderate Rohani elected as Iran’s president
Reuters: Iran’s interior minister declared moderate cleric Hassan Rohani the winner of Iran’s presidential election on Saturday after final results revealed Rohani secured just more than 50% of the votes — enough to avoid a run-off.
Rohani has been seen as the most moderate of all the candidates running. 72 percent of the 50 million Iranians eligible to vote turned out.
Photo: Iranian presidential candidate Hassan Rohani (L) waves to supporters in the central Iranian city of Shiraz on June 11. (via Reuters/Fars News/Mohammad Hadi Khosravi)


Rohani’s promises of reform and transparency have stood out in the current election and could prove helpful in easing relations between different factions of the country, as well as with the West. As Time notes, he was the only moderate candidate.

breakingnews:

Moderate Rohani elected as Iran’s president

Reuters: Iran’s interior minister declared moderate cleric Hassan Rohani the winner of Iran’s presidential election on Saturday after final results revealed Rohani secured just more than 50% of the votes — enough to avoid a run-off.

Rohani has been seen as the most moderate of all the candidates running. 72 percent of the 50 million Iranians eligible to vote turned out.

Photo: Iranian presidential candidate Hassan Rohani (L) waves to supporters in the central Iranian city of Shiraz on June 11. (via Reuters/Fars News/Mohammad Hadi Khosravi)

Rohani’s promises of reform and transparency have stood out in the current election and could prove helpful in easing relations between different factions of the country, as well as with the West. As Time notes, he was the only moderate candidate.

13:36 // 10 months ago
April 24, 2013

hypervocal:

“We are trying to be provocative in the best use of that term.” –Jon Rubin, Conflict Kitchen co-director

GREAT story we just posted about Conflict Kitchen, a Pittsburgh restaurant that only serves food from countries in conflict with the USA. Check this out, a great concept, and some great quotes.

“Reaction’s been great,” Rubin says when asked the obvious. “There’s never been this kind of food in Pittsburgh, and we didn’t know whether people would be into that. But people are starving for food and diversity.”

Such an amazing idea.

12:52 // 11 months ago
April 16, 2013

Dozens were injured or killed by Tuesday’s earthquake near the Iran-Pakistan border

  • 35+ people have died as a result of the earthquake which struck Iran and Pakistan, all of whom were residents of Pakistan, according to government officials.
  • 167+ people were injured during/after the 7.8 magnitude quake, which was felt as far away as Dubai. and the numbers could still rise. Emergency teams and rescue dogs continue to scour the rubble, double-checking for any survivors who may still be trapped on Tuesday afternoon. source
17:21 // 1 year ago
April 9, 2013

An update on the earthquake that hit Iran on Tuesday

  • 37 people were killed after a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck the Iranian city of Busheh, home to the country’s only nuclear power plant.
  • 850 people were injured as well on Tuesday, and the numbers are only expected to rise in the coming days. More than 700 homes were destroyed by the quake, and aftershocks forced building evacuations as far away as Qatar and Bahrain. source
17:37 // 1 year ago
nbcnightlynews:

6.3-magnitude earthquake strikes near Iran’s nuclear power plant Details: http://nbcnews.to/12EVAid

Worth keeping an eye on today.

nbcnightlynews:

6.3-magnitude earthquake strikes near Iran’s nuclear power plant 

Details: http://nbcnews.to/12EVAid

Worth keeping an eye on today.

9:52 // 1 year ago
March 21, 2013
nbcnews:

Obama, Netanyahu address Iran, Syria threats
(Photo: Larry Downing / Reuters)
During a wide-ranging press conference in Jerusalem, President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu discussed Middle East conflicts and a potential two-state solution.
Read the complete story.

“Whatever time is left, there’s not a lot of time.” — Netanyahu on figuring out a solution to the nuclear-enrichment issue in Iran, in direct response to Obama’s comment that “there is still time” to find a diplomatic solution.

nbcnews:

Obama, Netanyahu address Iran, Syria threats

(Photo: Larry Downing / Reuters)

During a wide-ranging press conference in Jerusalem, President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu discussed Middle East conflicts and a potential two-state solution.

Read the complete story.

“Whatever time is left, there’s not a lot of time.” — Netanyahu on figuring out a solution to the nuclear-enrichment issue in Iran, in direct response to Obama’s comment that “there is still time” to find a diplomatic solution.

(via reuterspictures)

9:31 // 1 year ago
March 16, 2013
theatlantic:

Google Reader’s Demise Is Awful for Iranians, Who Use It to Avoid Censorship

RSS readers take raw feeds of data—headline, text, timestamp, etc.—and display that information in a stripped-down interface along with many other feeds, which is what makes them so efficient. (Here is the RSS feed for Quartz.) Less obvious is how many RSS readers, including Google’s, serve as anti-censorship tools for people living under oppressive regimes. That’s because it’s actually Google’s servers, located in the U.S. or another country with uncensored internet, that accesses each feed. So a web user in Iran just needs access to google.com/reader in order to read websites that would otherwise be blocked.
Read more. [Image: AP]


This week in corporate decisions that are rankling nuisances to some, while far more dire to others.

theatlantic:

Google Reader’s Demise Is Awful for Iranians, Who Use It to Avoid Censorship

RSS readers take raw feeds of data—headline, text, timestamp, etc.—and display that information in a stripped-down interface along with many other feeds, which is what makes them so efficient. (Here is the RSS feed for Quartz.) Less obvious is how many RSS readers, including Google’s, serve as anti-censorship tools for people living under oppressive regimes. That’s because it’s actually Google’s servers, located in the U.S. or another country with uncensored internet, that accesses each feed. So a web user in Iran just needs access to google.com/reader in order to read websites that would otherwise be blocked.

Read more. [Image: AP]

This week in corporate decisions that are rankling nuisances to some, while far more dire to others.

18:09 // 1 year ago