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December 31, 2012

How Google is subverting Apple through the iPhone’s app store

usnews:

Over the past six months, Google has begun to systematically replace core, Apple-made iOS apps with Google-made iOS apps. In July, Google launched Chrome for iPhone – a Safari replacement. Then, in October came Google Search – which included a voice search feature to compete with Siri. In December, Google launched Google Maps to replace Apple Maps, and a much-improved Gmail to replace Apple’s core Mail app. It also put out a new YouTube app, to replace the one that Apple removed during its last iOS upgrade.

In a way, Apple shot itself in the foot because, by dropping Google’s apps, they effectively allowed Google to prove is better at iOS app development than they are. (Barring the Gmail app, but that’s a different story.)

Expect iOS7 to have an updated design philosophy, because it’s beginning to feel dated now that developers are increasingly outpacing Apple itself at app design.

11:40 // 1 year ago
October 25, 2012

Apple’s slow but steady takeover of mobile computing continues

  • 5.3M iPods were sold by Apple during their fourth fiscal quarter of 2012, according to the company’s most recent earnings call.
  • 14M iPads were sold during the same period of time, though both the iPod and iPad product lines undersold analysts’ expectations. Yes, apparently, only selling 20 million devices is disappointing to some folks. 
  • 26.9M iPhones were also sold during the company’s fourth quarter, underperforming yet again; however, we suspect the imminent release of the iPhone 5 may have played a significant role in dwindling numbers. source
17:33 // 1 year ago
September 20, 2012

iOS 6 will probably be on more devices than iOS 5 by Monday

  • 15 percent of all eligible devices have iOS 6 installed only 24 hours after its release. When you include the flood of iPhone 5’s that will be activated with iOS 6 tomorrow, the numbers are only going to go up.
  • 20 percent of all eligible devices didn’t have iOS 5 installed until five days after the iOS update’s release. Clearly, native YouTube and Google Maps apps weren’t all that important to fans of Apple. source
17:30 // 1 year ago
September 5, 2012
The FBI has not requested this information from Apple, nor have we provided it to the FBI or any organization. Additionally, with iOS 6 we introduced a new set of APIs meant to replace the use of the UDID and will soon be banning the use of UDID.
Apple spokesperson Natale Kerris • Denying that they were working with the FBI by sharing UDID numbers with them — but further, emphasizing that the UDID system will soon be a thing of the past. The statement backs up the FBI’s statement saying there was no evidence they had such data, or that they had been hacked at all. One million device UDIDs were leaked on Tuesday by hacker syndicate AntiSec.
13:24 // 1 year ago
September 4, 2012
Guess what’s happening next week? Why yes, that is a shadow in the shape of the number 5, Apple fans.

Guess what’s happening next week? Why yes, that is a shadow in the shape of the number 5, Apple fans.

12:18 // 1 year ago

Hacker group leaks list of 1 million Apple device identifiers, says it’s from FBI

  • 12 million the number of Apple iOS device identifiers in the FBI’s custody, according to AntiSec
  • 1 million the number of device numbers AntiSec publicly leaked early Tuesday morning source

» Wait a sec … the FBI had them? Well, funny story about that. Back in March, the group says they gained access to a computer owned by an FBI official. Just by chance, they found a file on the agent’s desktop titled “NCFTA_iOS_devices_intel.csv” — a long list of 12 million UDID identifiers for iOS devices, along with a number of other pieces of personal info. AntiSec released just 1 million of the UDID numbers (which you can analyze here to see if you were nailed), but it’s worth keeping in mind that the odds may not be super-high of getting hit. There are 410 million iOS devices on the market, as of July. The problem for many is that the FBI reportedly had this info in the first place. What did they need it for, and why was it sitting on some dude’s desktop?

UPDATE: The FBI says that there is “no evidence” they had a file like the one described above.

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8:11 // 1 year ago
August 31, 2012

Apple, Google reportedly sorting out their differences over patents

  • cause In a stinging defeat for Samsung and a resounding victory for Apple in its fight against Google’s Android operating system, jurors decided a highly-watched patent lawsuit sharply in the iPhone maker’s favor, leading to over $1 billion in penalties and word of an appeal.
  • reaction Apparently, the respective CEOs at Apple and Google — two companies that have slowly become bitter enemies over the smartphone market — are talking about some sort of patent agreement. Could Apple cave and offer Google licensing? source

» Why the jury favored Apple: Jury foreman Velvin Hogan, in an interview with the BBC, says that the evidence strongly showed that Samsung was infringing on Apple’s patents. “When we went into deliberation in the jury room we not only had all the physical evidence of everything that was presented,” he said, “but we also had sealed source code in its entirety from both sides, we actually had the memos that were talked about in the trial … and there was a piece of evidence after a piece of evidence that just clearly stacked up.”

11:02 // 1 year ago
August 22, 2012
parislemon:

Speaking of Flickr, time for an update on the the Popular Cameraphones chart:
1) iPhone 4S
2) iPhone 4
3) iPhone 3GS
4) iPhone 3G
5) Samsung Galaxy S II
The good news: Android is finally on the verge of overtaking an iOS device on the chart.
The bad news: this iOS device is four years old. It’s so old, in fact, that the iPhone 3G was taken off the market by Apple a year ago. Yet there still isn’t a single Android device that can pass it on this chart. Pretty pathetic. 
The other bad news: the iPhone 4S and iPhone 4 are so far ahead of the rest of the cameraphone pack that it seems highly unlikely that any Android device will come close anytime soon. In fact, they’re the number one and number two cameras used to take Flickr photos, period. Not smartphone cameras — cameras, cameras.
The really bad news: the new iPhone is a month away.

But on the other hand, we’re talking about the Android community, where there are so many varieties of phones out there that it’s possible that if you combined them all together, it might be a different picture. The reason why the iPhone and iPhone 4S models rank so high on this chart is because of lack of splintering … right?

parislemon:

Speaking of Flickr, time for an update on the the Popular Cameraphones chart:

1) iPhone 4S

2) iPhone 4

3) iPhone 3GS

4) iPhone 3G

5) Samsung Galaxy S II

The good news: Android is finally on the verge of overtaking an iOS device on the chart.

The bad news: this iOS device is four years old. It’s so old, in fact, that the iPhone 3G was taken off the market by Apple a year ago. Yet there still isn’t a single Android device that can pass it on this chart. Pretty pathetic. 

The other bad news: the iPhone 4S and iPhone 4 are so far ahead of the rest of the cameraphone pack that it seems highly unlikely that any Android device will come close anytime soon. In fact, they’re the number one and number two cameras used to take Flickr photos, period. Not smartphone cameras — cameras, cameras.

The really bad news: the new iPhone is a month away.

But on the other hand, we’re talking about the Android community, where there are so many varieties of phones out there that it’s possible that if you combined them all together, it might be a different picture. The reason why the iPhone and iPhone 4S models rank so high on this chart is because of lack of splintering … right?

9:21 // 1 year ago
August 17, 2012
22:55 // 2 years ago
July 30, 2012
They’re more in a dictatorship mode where they say, ‘This is what you have to do or you don’t get the iPhone.’ Being arrogant with your partners in big markets doesn’t pay off.
Vasyl Latsanych, Vice President of Marketing at Russian mobile carrier OAO Mobile TeleSystems • Offering his employers’ explanation for the iPhone’s extremely high price — which have reportedly topped $1000 at times — compared to other smartphones available in Russia. As the author also notes, the majority Russian consumers do not sign long term contracts for mobile service, removing any incentive for carriers themselves to help subsidize the high cost of some devices. Think this is the sort of thing investor’s were worried about last week when asking Apple CEO Tim Cook about entry barriers in emerging marketssource (viafollow)
21:24 // 2 years ago