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April 2, 2013
20:05 // 1 year ago
January 29, 2013
wingtipsandloafers:

kiplinger:

Is Carl Icahn a better investor than Warren Buffett? 
Is that even possible? If you’ve never heard of Icahn, you’re not alone. Well known in the world of finance but relatively unfamiliar to individuals, Icahn is arguably one of the great value investors of all time. And, lucky for the rest of us, investors can piggyback on his profitable investments by mimicking his moves, or simply by buying shares of Icahn Enterprises.

Giants…

To wannabe investors who think they can’t do it, just keep saying “Yes, Icahn.”

wingtipsandloafers:

kiplinger:

Is Carl Icahn a better investor than Warren Buffett?

Is that even possible? If you’ve never heard of Icahn, you’re not alone. Well known in the world of finance but relatively unfamiliar to individuals, Icahn is arguably one of the great value investors of all time. And, lucky for the rest of us, investors can piggyback on his profitable investments by mimicking his moves, or simply by buying shares of Icahn Enterprises.

Giants…

To wannabe investors who think they can’t do it, just keep saying “Yes, Icahn.”

13:08 // 1 year ago
May 6, 2012

Warren Buffett turned his back on extremely expensive mega-deal

  • $22 billion deal killed at the last minute by Warren Buffett source

» “I just couldn’t make the deal … We couldn’t come to an agreement.”: Buffett, known as a shrewd investor even when the stakes are insanely high, spoke about his almost-deal Saturday on Bloomberg TV. He wouldn’t say who it was, but considering the value, it must’ve been a massive company with a sizable legacy. Why’d he pass on the deal? Simple. Too expensive. The deal would’ve forced him to sell securities he wanted to keep. Buffett, who recently announced he was suffering from cancer, is still looking for the right deals to help add value to his $37.8 billion in cash. ”If we can make a good deal tomorrow, whether it’s big or small, we’ll make it,” he said.

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21:00 // 2 years ago
September 30, 2011

Stock market suckage: A crappy quarter, put to bed by a crappy day

  • bad Today was not a good day for the stock market in general, with all three major indexes down more than two percent amid negative economic data from China, which raised fears that another economic slowdown was coming.
  • worse This is the final day of the quarter on Wall Street, and the results aren’t very good. The S&P, for example, lost more than 14 percent this quarter. Fears of an economic slowdown weighed on investors’ minds after the 2008 crisis. source
16:52 // 2 years ago
August 25, 2011

Warren Buffett invests a ton of cash in struggling Bank of America

  • $5 billion investment from Warren Buffett to Bank of America source

» Giving it to the needy: Our boy Warren Buffett, who recently took the U.S. government to task for not raising taxes on the rich, is giving a big cash infusion to a company that’s struggling build confidence in investors. It’s taken a hit on the stock market — its shares are down nearly 30 percent since the beginning of August and it just announced some huge job cuts — and it owns a couple of properties, Countrywide and Merrill Lynch, noted for their spectacular combustions during the financial crisis. Buffett’s deal is pretty sweet — a 6 percent annual dividend and a 5 percent premium if he buys back the stock — but he nonetheless sounds like he’s doing it out of respect for the company. “I am impressed with the profit-generating abilities of this franchise, and that they are acting aggressively to put their challenges behind them,” Buffett said in a statement. “Bank of America is focused on their customers and on serving them well. That’s what customers want, and that’s the company’s strategy.”

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10:31 // 2 years ago
August 16, 2011
Record levels of cash are piling up in corporate treasuries, idling. The only way to break this cycle of fear is to break it.
Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz • Following the lead of Warren Buffett and pushing for more responsibility from those that can afford it. While Buffett went after super-rich taxpayers; Schultz instead is going after corporations that are sitting on piles of cash, yet are staying on the sidelines and choosing not to hire more people — or worse, putting that money into political campaigns in hopes of putting business-friendly leadership in power in 2012. While Starbucks has had union issues and gay rights issues crop up recently, the company does have a reputation for treating its employees better than most corporations of its size. Kudos, Howard. source (viafollow)
2:48 // 3 years ago
June 24, 2011
If they can’t give shareholders value, then they have to give cash.
Ralph Nader • Playing activist investor in the wake of frustration with Cisco’s stock. Nader, an investor in the company (he has 18,000 shares), wrote a letter a while back complaining about the company’s low dividends, despite the fact that their stock performance has been week and they have tons of cash in the bank, and the “powerlessness of owner shareholders” that resulted from this. It’s pretty weird that the consumer advocate, of all people, is taking on this role, but hey, maybe he just thinks their shares are unsafe at any speed. source (viafollow)
12:35 // 3 years ago
April 21, 2011
General Electric’s impressive profits not impressive enough: Because really, nobody gives a crap that your multi-billion-dollar company has a massive jump in profit. You need to do it with style or go home. (Seriously, does anything impress these investors these days? Does GE’s CEO have to tell investors of the huge jump in profits while walking on his hands and hula-hooping? Because that wold impress us. But would that impress investors?)

General Electric’s impressive profits not impressive enough: Because really, nobody gives a crap that your multi-billion-dollar company has a massive jump in profit. You need to do it with style or go home. (Seriously, does anything impress these investors these days? Does GE’s CEO have to tell investors of the huge jump in profits while walking on his hands and hula-hooping? Because that wold impress us. But would that impress investors?)

11:15 // 3 years ago
March 8, 2011
Hey, insider trading fans: Keep an eye on this dude’s trial!: The trial of Raj Rajaratnam, the founder of the Galleon hedge fund, starts today. Raj reportedly made $45 million in illicit profits – the worst case of insider trading in a generation. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Hey, insider trading fans: Keep an eye on this dude’s trial!: The trial of Raj Rajaratnam, the founder of the Galleon hedge fund, starts today. Raj reportedly made $45 million in illicit profits – the worst case of insider trading in a generation. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

10:39 // 3 years ago