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July 1, 2013
19:11 // 9 months ago
April 28, 2013
ilovecharts:

Inequality and New York’s Subway [article]

Smart idea for an infographic. Whenever an image gets you to interact with a serious topic in a smart way, take a step back and think about why it’s so effective. That’s where the lessons are.

ilovecharts:

Inequality and New York’s Subway [article]

Smart idea for an infographic. Whenever an image gets you to interact with a serious topic in a smart way, take a step back and think about why it’s so effective. That’s where the lessons are.

(via upworthy)

15:26 // 12 months ago
April 11, 2013
ilovecharts:

The whole North Korean army in one place

When it’s all laid out like that in one graphic, it’s pretty huge.

ilovecharts:

The whole North Korean army in one place

When it’s all laid out like that in one graphic, it’s pretty huge.

9:53 // 1 year ago
January 17, 2013
We searched on the internet and found a horizontal infographic just to show you guys what can be done with this panorama thingy. Unfortunately, it’s from Microsoft. But whatevs! It still looks awesome, right?

We searched on the internet and found a horizontal infographic just to show you guys what can be done with this panorama thingy. Unfortunately, it’s from Microsoft. But whatevs! It still looks awesome, right?

16:05 // 1 year ago
January 13, 2013
journo-geekery:


Volumetric Bar-Chart Chip Creates Infographic from Blood Measurements - information aesthetics


The recent academic paper “Multiplexed Volumetric Bar-Chart Chip for Point-of-Care Diagnostics” [nature.com], developed by researchers at the Department of Nanomedicine, The Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston, Texas, presents the research behind the V-Chip (short for Volumetric Bar-Chart Chip).
The chip is about the size of a business card, yet is able to turn about 50 test results into a live, physical bar chart that can be readily read out. This unique feature is achieved by linking a concentration measurement with a proportional production of oxygen, with then causes ink (not blood!) to be displaced along a thin channel in the device.


Cool.


Raise your hand if your blood helped inspire an infographic today.

journo-geekery:

Volumetric Bar-Chart Chip Creates Infographic from Blood Measurements - information aesthetics

The recent academic paper “Multiplexed Volumetric Bar-Chart Chip for Point-of-Care Diagnostics” [nature.com], developed by researchers at the Department of Nanomedicine, The Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston, Texas, presents the research behind the V-Chip (short for Volumetric Bar-Chart Chip).

The chip is about the size of a business card, yet is able to turn about 50 test results into a live, physical bar chart that can be readily read out. This unique feature is achieved by linking a concentration measurement with a proportional production of oxygen, with then causes ink (not blood!) to be displaced along a thin channel in the device.

Cool.

Raise your hand if your blood helped inspire an infographic today.

14:36 // 1 year ago
January 11, 2013
fastcodesign:

How a Civil War vet invented the American infographic…

Francis Amasa Walker was so far ahead of his time that his tie was on the grid.

fastcodesign:

How a Civil War vet invented the American infographic…

Francis Amasa Walker was so far ahead of his time that his tie was on the grid.

(via fastcodesign)

8:41 // 1 year ago
November 5, 2012
election:

How a genius election-related graphic came together
The other night, I posted this really amazing New York Times graphic breaking down the numerous roads to Electoral College victory Obama and Romney can take. Think the graphic was cool? Now here’s how they did it. In the words of the Times’ very own Mike Bostock:

The hard part of this graphic, implementation-wise, is the animated transition as you flip states. Although this is superficially similar to collapsible interactive trees I had implemented previously, it turned out to be more challenging due to the pruning below decision nodes. To assist my thinking, I sketched out a sample tree with eight different interactions and the corresponding animations. With examples, it was possible to generalize the behavior of the transitions and start the implementation.

Which road do you think the Electoral College is going to take?
— Ernie @ ShortFormBlog

Infographic creators aspire to create something this awesome. And here it is.

election:

How a genius election-related graphic came together

The other night, I posted this really amazing New York Times graphic breaking down the numerous roads to Electoral College victory Obama and Romney can take. Think the graphic was cool? Now here’s how they did it. In the words of the Times’ very own Mike Bostock:

The hard part of this graphic, implementation-wise, is the animated transition as you flip states. Although this is superficially similar to collapsible interactive trees I had implemented previously, it turned out to be more challenging due to the pruning below decision nodes. To assist my thinking, I sketched out a sample tree with eight different interactions and the corresponding animations. With examples, it was possible to generalize the behavior of the transitions and start the implementation.

Which road do you think the Electoral College is going to take?

— Ernie @ ShortFormBlog

Infographic creators aspire to create something this awesome. And here it is.

(via gov)

19:20 // 1 year ago
November 3, 2012
Genius graphic of the day: As the New York Times shows in the amazing interactive piece “512 Paths to the White House,” Obama’s path to winning the Electoral College is much easier than that of Romney. In fact, if Obama wins Florida, Romney would have to win eight other toss-up states to topple that blow. That’s less likely than an Obama Ohio win at the moment, but … ah, why explain it?! Play with the fun, interactive, awesome graphic! (ht Jason Smedvik)

Genius graphic of the day: As the New York Times shows in the amazing interactive piece “512 Paths to the White House,” Obama’s path to winning the Electoral College is much easier than that of Romney. In fact, if Obama wins Florida, Romney would have to win eight other toss-up states to topple that blow. That’s less likely than an Obama Ohio win at the moment, but … ah, why explain it?! Play with the fun, interactive, awesome graphic! (ht Jason Smedvik)

0:38 // 1 year ago
October 16, 2012
According to a new study, commissioned by device warranty provider Squaretrade, approximately 51 percent of broken smartphones are damaged inside the phone owner’s home. We’ve posted a portion of the accompanying infographic, depicting the most common household smartphone “danger zones”. So how does Squaretrade’s report stack up against your own usage? Whose kitchen has the highest kill/death ratio? source

According to a new study, commissioned by device warranty provider Squaretrade, approximately 51 percent of broken smartphones are damaged inside the phone owner’s home. We’ve posted a portion of the accompanying infographic, depicting the most common household smartphone “danger zones”. So how does Squaretrade’s report stack up against your own usage? Whose kitchen has the highest kill/death ratio? source

14:43 // 1 year ago
October 4, 2012
OK, USA Today, we love your chunky infographic style.

OK, USA Today, we love your chunky infographic style.

11:41 // 1 year ago