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May 21, 2012
11:57 // 2 years ago
May 7, 2012

producermatthew:

Flip Socialism: Even before the allegations of rape against former IMF boss Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Francois Hollande was moving himself in to become the next Socialist presidential candidate, according to one French commentator. “Some say that he knew, like actually many others in the part, that DSK was doomed: His colorful private life was always bound to prevent his running for president,” journalist Agnes Poirier said. [Photos: Reuters]

CNN: How Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s fall led to Hollande’s rise

In which a tabloid-headline-generating scandal in a hotel room an ocean away from France sealed the fate of an election.

11:42 // 2 years ago
September 18, 2011

Dominique Strauss-Kahn admits “moral failing,” denies everything else

  • yeah … Dominique Strauss-Kahn admitted to a “moral failing” in his sexual encounter with a NYC hotel maid, in an interview with a French television station. It was his first public interview since the former IMF leader was arrested in May.
  • … but He claimed the sex was consensual, and that he did nothing that constituted an arrest. He also said an accusation that he attempted to rape French journalist Tristane Banon was ”imaginary and slanderous.” source
20:50 // 2 years ago
August 29, 2011
21:42 // 2 years ago
August 20, 2011
23:12 // 2 years ago
August 19, 2011

On grass being green and the fate of Dominique Strauss-Kahn

waskommenmag said: You might as well report that the grass is green. That’s the way law works.

» SFB says: Wait, what? If a report comes out claiming that the suspect in a high-profile sexual assault case is planning to settle with the accuser, that’s a major development that affects at least two people. Sorry, not following your logic. — Ernie @ SFB

18:30 // 2 years ago
July 24, 2011
poynterinstitute:

Nafissatou Diallo gives Newsweek, ABC News her exclusive account of what happened with Dominique Strauss-Kahn in Sofitel hotel room 2806.

“I never want to be in public but I have no choice,” Diallo told ABC News, adding “Now, I have to be in public. I have to, for myself. I have to tell the truth.”
We don’t know for certain what happened in that room, but it’s unfortunate when an accuser in a rape case has to come forward to the media to attempt to set the record straight. How do you guys feel about this situation? It started out complex and now it’s publicly spilled onto the cover of Newsweek — like a really unfortunate version of “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard.” A lot to handle.

poynterinstitute:

Nafissatou Diallo gives Newsweek, ABC News her exclusive account of what happened with Dominique Strauss-Kahn in Sofitel hotel room 2806.

“I never want to be in public but I have no choice,” Diallo told ABC News, adding “Now, I have to be in public. I have to, for myself. I have to tell the truth.”

We don’t know for certain what happened in that room, but it’s unfortunate when an accuser in a rape case has to come forward to the media to attempt to set the record straight. How do you guys feel about this situation? It started out complex and now it’s publicly spilled onto the cover of Newsweek — like a really unfortunate version of “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard.” A lot to handle.

21:20 // 2 years ago
July 5, 2011
For a person who has already been violated once, all the media exposure violates them again. We have a strong tradition of defendant’s rights. But if you’re a victim, you have fewer rights than an accused person.
National Center for Victims of Crime executive director Mai Fernandez • Offering an argument against the idea of naming the victim in high-profile rape cases like that of Dominique Strauss-Kahn. There’s a good point in this — we do everything to cover the stories of high-profile sexual assault cases — but we never name the victim, even when we note every other detail about their lives, down to their money problems. The tradition of not naming the victim in cases like this one, which stretches back a century, is getting fresh scrutiny in the wake of new details in the Strauss-Kahn case. One guy getting some airtime as a result of these new revelations is Alan Dershowitz, a defense lawyer most famous for the O.J. Simpson trial, who says that the practice saddles the defendant with the presumption of guilt — especially when, as in the case of Strauss-Kahn, they take a perp walk. What do you guys think? Is Alan barking up the wrong tree? source (viafollow)
21:33 // 3 years ago
July 2, 2011
It will be very hard to believe in the future what African people say. She has to repent if she’s lying.
Nigerian Imam Nurudeen Sulayman • Discussing the NYC African community’s feelings on the Dominique Strauss-Kahn accuser — especially among Guineans. To put it simply, they worry that it reflects badly on their community. The new developments around the accuser, who reportedly called a prison inmate and talked to him about extorting Strauss-Kahn in a rare dialect of Fulani, have put unwelcome attention on fellow Guineans in the city. “It’s about the two of them,” said Mamadou Diallo, president of the Futa Islamic Center, where the accuser reportedly attended services. “All we can do is stand still and watch.” source (viafollow)
9:59 // 3 years ago
July 1, 2011
Our concern is that the Manhattan district attorney is too afraid to try this case. We believe he’s afraid he’s going to lose this high-profile case.
Lawyer Kenneth Thompson, who represents Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s accuser • Describing the issues currently clouding the Dominique Strauss-Kahn rape trial. If you read the document, it notes a few things which could damage the victim’s credibility in a court of law — meaning that, even if the French politician actually did assault her (Thompson claims that the physical evidence still supports her case), there are inconsistencies which could damage her case in the eyes of a jury. These inconsistencies show up both in her backstory and her story of the moments before and after the alleged assault, and have been documented in this letter the New York Times posted earlier. All of this is to say that this may be an issue of perception — an assault may still have taken place. But purely circumstantial reasons could hurt the prosecutor’s ability to get a conviction. source (viafollow)
16:08 // 3 years ago