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August 29, 2011
Before Katrina, it was a longstanding tradition in our country for political officials to wait until the last minute to warn, to take action, to evacuate. No more. With Irene, you had mass evacuations — mandatory ones — issued days ahead of time. That was the right thing to do.
Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honore • Regarding the changing approach to hurricanes since Hurricane Katrina, which made landfall in Louisiana six years ago today. Honore was one of the officials whose work on the recovery from that storm was widely respected. To put his point another way: “I’ve been in the storm business for years and I’ve never seen officials be prudent enough to cancel commercial and sporting events before a storm. Folks in the Northeast did that. The day before Katrina, we had a football game in Baton Rouge. That’s how far the community has come.” So there you have it: The guy who coordinated much of the the Katrina response says they did the right thing on Irene. source (viafollow)
10:34 // 2 years ago

Commuters in NYC slowly getting back to normal after Irene

  • positive All of New York City’s subway routes are moving along without much trouble. While service was supposed to be lighter than usual, many riders said they didn’t notice any significant delays.
  • negative However, if you’re commuting from outside the city — especially Connecticut or New Jersey, you’re out of luck. All lines of the Metro-North Railroad are down, as are New Jersey Transit trains. source
10:21 // 2 years ago
Our emergency management people are flat-out trying as hard as they can to avoid loss of life. We have been encouraging any Vermonter who lives near a brook, river or lake should head to higher ground.
Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin • Offering a message to people in his state affected by the now-former tropical storm Irene, which is really now just a giant storm that’s dropping a ton of rain on Shumlin’s state. And the state wasn’t expecting it: According to Shumlin, officials expected the storm to nail the Connecticut River Valley, but the storm track changed and now it’s over Vermont. Some locals have called it the worst flooding the region has seen in a generation. So yeah, Irene’s nothing to screw with even though she’s no longer a tropical storm. source (viafollow)
1:30 // 2 years ago
August 28, 2011
21:30 // 2 years ago

Hurricane Irene’s costs — both in human and monetary form

  • 19 deaths reported so far from Hurricane Irene source

» And damages in “the tens of billions”: With the storm largely past U.S. shores, now begins the tallying of damages. You’ve seen some examples of this already. But while it’s too soon to predict exactly what the final tally will be, in New Jersey, Chris Christie is already throwing a price tag on things. ”I’ve got to imagine that the damage estimates are going to be in the billions of dollars, if not in the tens of billions of dollars,” he told “Meet the Press” this morning. These costs will largely be eaten by the federal government. The loss of human life, however, won’t be. Click the source link above. It’s a blow by blow of saddening proportions.

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20:25 // 2 years ago
A road broken in five places: ”Officials survey the damage to Route 12 on Hatteras Island, N.C., on Aug. 28. Hurricane Irene swept through the area Saturday cutting the roadway in five locations. Irene caused more than 4.5 million homes and businesses along the East Coast to reportedly lose power over the weekend, and at least 11 deaths were blamed on the storm.” Roughly 2,500 people are stuck on Hatteras Island as a result of this. (thanks kateoplis)

A road broken in five places: ”Officials survey the damage to Route 12 on Hatteras Island, N.C., on Aug. 28. Hurricane Irene swept through the area Saturday cutting the roadway in five locations. Irene caused more than 4.5 million homes and businesses along the East Coast to reportedly lose power over the weekend, and at least 11 deaths were blamed on the storm.” Roughly 2,500 people are stuck on Hatteras Island as a result of this. (thanks kateoplis)

15:34 // 2 years ago
13:57 // 2 years ago

"We’ve got a billion-dollar disaster here."

briancolligan:

Anyone who doubts this was a serious storm is welcome to come on down to eastern North Carolina, where we’re trying to put communities back together. We still have thousands displaced, hundreds of homes damaged or destroyed, thousands without power and, oh by the way, killed two people in the county in which I live. We’ve got a billion-dollar disaster here, even if it didn’t happen in a large American city or the world’s media capital.

So, yeah, come on down. Rent a truck to haul debris. Bring a chainsaw. Or save yourself the travel and send some money to the American Red Cross, which is trying to help those in need. Irene may not have hit New York as forecast, but it was bad enough from where I stand. So lend a hand or shut the hell up.

Pretty much everything he said. Virginia got it pretty bad too.

(Source: shortformblog)

12:56 // 2 years ago

On Hurricane Irene naysayers: Leave your stupid comments in your pocket!

We just spotted a reblog to an Irene post which angered us a little bit. It belittled the storm, piece by piece, because it could. It criticized the post for pointing out the diameter of the storm — you know, the huge slow-moving storm that has flooded areas of the country from North Carolina to New York. Sure, it’s not a powerful storm by hurricane standards, but it is one that caused a lot of damage nonetheless. This guy also made a bunch of other inconsiderate comments (he belittles the fact that people died!), but let’s be clear: While this storm was not as bad as it could’ve been, it did cause damage and wide-scale flooding and inconvenience millions of people not used to storms of this nature. Sometimes, the snark is warranted. In this case, it’s not. People died. Millions of dollars of damage was caused. Millions of people not used to storms like these were affected. As our friend Mark says in “The Room”: Leave your stupid comments in your pocket!

12:06 // 2 years ago

Hurricane Irene: It’s not all good news, but things are looking up

  • good Hurricane Irene is no longer a hurricane, but a tropical storm. It’s also passed by most of NYC, New Jersey, Delaware, Virginia and DC. It’s mostly on land at this point and is moving much quicker than it was yesterday, so it will lose strength quickly. Whew, guys.
  • bad However, it left some bad stuff in its wake — flooding, millions without power, 11 deaths in four different states, and lots of small inconveniences that built up into one pretty big one. In the end, though, it’s less bad than it could’ve been. Fortunately. source

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10:51 // 2 years ago