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February 11, 2011

More on Israel in the wake of Egypt.

theonlyplfrmat said: I feel like, putting ourselves in Israel’s shoes, it’s a bit naive to browbeat them for not supporting a people’s revolution in Egypt when, the last time Egypt was hostile, Israel’s literal existence was on the line. How do you want them to react?

» We say: I think it’s equally naive for them to assume the worst of intentions of the Egyptian people. Fact of the matter is, they have every right to be concerned, but supporting a leader who limits the rights of others just because he personally benefits you is not a good reason. We don’t know what Egypt will do next. There’s no evidence that the Muslim Brotherhood will even gain power or influence in Egypt. There is evidence that Mubarak’s people were attempting to limit the press and the free flow of information. There’s a point where the cost-benefit ratio skews too far in one direction, and it was passed here. Israel is right to have concerns and to work on them with whoever leads from here – they’ve had a rough history with many bumps along the way. But there was a reason why the US eventually backed away from Mubarak.

18:41 // 3 years ago
The Muslim Brotherhood has already said they won’t be committed to the peace treaty. I don’t see a military conflict with Israel. But the whole regional order of the last 30 years will be totally shattered.
Former Israel ambassador to Egypt Eli Shaked • Expressing his, and by extension his country’s fears over losing a major ally in the revolution that ousted Hosni Mubarak. Unlike the United States, Israel never turned away from their longtime ally in fear of what would come for Egypt after. Their biggest fear? While they don’t expect another war in the region, they fear the possibility that the Muslim Brotherhood, a group they feel would be against Israel, would gain a foothold in Egyptian politics. There’s a point where diplomatic concerns becomes a poor reason to diplomatically block a country’s freedoms, and most countries feel we passed it. Israel apparently didn’t. source (viafollow)
18:07 // 3 years ago
This is the greatest day of my life. The country has been liberated.
Egyptian opposition figure Mohamed ElBaradei • In his immediate reaction to the news that Hosni Mubarak has left power in Egypt. It’s too soon to tell what happens next, but the excitement is strong in Tahrir Square. source (viafollow)
11:21 // 3 years ago

BREAKING: Hosni Mubarak steps down as Egyptian president

  • yesterday In a defiant speech, Hosni Mubarak made it clear that he was in fact not stepping down from his perch as Egyptian leader.
  • today Vice President Omar Suleiman announced that Mubarak just stepped down today. Guess that wasn’t so true, huh? source
11:10 // 3 years ago
Is Hosni Mubarak effectively out? Most signs point to yes.: So, what happens when you claim to still be the leader of a country, then immediately leave the city as if in exile? Considering Hosni Mubarak’s recent moves, we may find out. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Is Hosni Mubarak effectively out? Most signs point to yes.: So, what happens when you claim to still be the leader of a country, then immediately leave the city as if in exile? Considering Hosni Mubarak’s recent moves, we may find out. source

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9:34 // 3 years ago
February 10, 2011

Did Mubarak’s insane speech help Wall Street today?

  • YES the speech helped stocks make a late-day rally source

» Why did that happen? Simply put, the stock market liked the fact that Mubarak said he was giving up much of his authority in Egypt to Omar Suleiman – not enough for protesters, but apparently enough for money managers. ”The moment Mubarak said he would be giving up duties to his vice president, the market said it was a good thing and rose,” said Michael Holland, whose company manages billions in funds on the market.

21:52 // 3 years ago
Mubarak’s speech made Obama, Leon Panetta look like fools: Uh-oh, someone bought into the narrative. (At a speech in Michigan, Obama suggested Egypt’s transition was imminent. Panetta did the same earlier in the day.) But so did everyone else. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Mubarak’s speech made Obama, Leon Panetta look like fools: Uh-oh, someone bought into the narrative. (At a speech in Michigan, Obama suggested Egypt’s transition was imminent. Panetta did the same earlier in the day.) But so did everyone else. source

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21:37 // 3 years ago
He offered a vaguely worded delegation of power to Vice President Omar Suleiman, long after everyone in Egypt had stopped listening. It is virtually impossible to conceive of a more poorly conceived or executed speech.
Foreign Policy writer Marc Lynch • Scoring the speech at home and saying the obvious. We could have made a better speech than Hosni Mubarak, and we suck at public speaking! That’s why we use the internet! Lynch notes that the speech from Omar Suleiman was as damaging, if not moreso than Mubarak’s, because it inextricably tied an unpopular figure to his potential successor – especially since he implicitly blamed Al Jazeera for his problems. “It solidified the already deep distrust of his role among most of the opposition and of the protestors,” Lynch wrote, “and tied his fate to that of Mubarak.” From here, things will only get worse for everyone involved – especially the United States, who have a hard game of chess ahead, and the protesters on the ground, who may grow more unruly and already have a protest planned for tomorrow. source (viafollow)
21:21 // 3 years ago

"I can not and will not accept to be dictated orders from outside, no matter what the source is." What makes a leader, in the face of international, media and local scrutiny, choose not to listen to repeated calls to resign? Who essentially shames his allies? A man whose statements are so transparent that not even his own people believe them? And why is it that the world allowed him to gain so much authority that he can’t easily be toppled from his position? There are a lot of questions tonight, and we’ve been parsing through them all afternoon. The fact that Mubarak was effectively supported by the United States makes the question marks much more pointed. As Americans, we need to learn how to encourage democracy at all costs, and focus less on what we gain – leverage in Israel, influence in a region, whatever. We can’t support another military state created by the United States. It’s ended in tears multiple times, and every time, Americans lose out monetarily, civilians lose their rights, and our world becomes a little more unstable. No more. This has to stop. source

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20:57 // 3 years ago