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June 2, 2012
Ousted Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak sentenced to life in prison
The former Egyptian leader, shown from the cage he was held inside the courtroom, is the first former leader convicted in the wake of the Arab Spring revolutions in the past 16 months. Mubarak’s conviction, however, may not stand — he was convicted for killings of unarmed protesters in the early days of the protests in Egypt, but many of the officials under him were acquitted for the same actions. Nonetheless, a significant event in the Arab Spring’s history. (photo via Reuters TV)

Ousted Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak sentenced to life in prison

The former Egyptian leader, shown from the cage he was held inside the courtroom, is the first former leader convicted in the wake of the Arab Spring revolutions in the past 16 months. Mubarak’s conviction, however, may not stand — he was convicted for killings of unarmed protesters in the early days of the protests in Egypt, but many of the officials under him were acquitted for the same actions. Nonetheless, a significant event in the Arab Spring’s history. (photo via Reuters TV)

8:57 // 1 year ago
January 25, 2012

Sights and sounds on the ground: Egyptians packed into Tahrir Square today in celebration (with some underlying tension, due to the continued rule of the Military Council) of the anniversary of protests that toppled Hosni Mubarak’s reign. That there are complex and treacherous political problems facing the nation going forward is undeniable, but there’s no shame in taking a moment to look back at just how much Egypt has changed in one year. source

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14:45 // 2 years ago
January 5, 2012
reuters:

Prosecutor seeks death for Egypt’s Mubarak 

But then again, it’s not like he’s got a strong handle on life these days.

reuters:

Prosecutor seeks death for Egypt’s Mubarak 

But then again, it’s not like he’s got a strong handle on life these days.

(via joshsternberg)

12:07 // 2 years ago
November 21, 2011
People here feel that they have been cheated and that they have moved from an autocracy to a military dictatorship. So they are back to the square — back to square one — to ask for their rights once again.
Egyptian protester Mosa’ab Elshamy • Discussing the resurgence of the protests at Tahrir Square over the weekend. It’s been a particularly bloody weekend in Egypt, with at least 22 protesters killed and 1,700 injured, roughly 102 of those police officers. The military claims it didn’t intend for things to go the way they’re going, and plan to relinquish power after the country has its long-in-the-works elections. Those elections are planned for November 28, about a week from now. source (viafollow)
10:09 // 2 years ago
September 5, 2011
thepoliticalnotebook:

Cairo, Egypt. Anger erupted today as the former dictator returned to court. His appearances, at the order of the judge, are no longer televised. Fighting broke out outside between loyalists and families of those killed in the 18-day revolution while inside lawyers punched one another. Lawyers sent from Kuwait to help defend Mubarak were not allowed to enter the courtroom. During the proceedings, Gen. Hussein Saied Moussa testified that Gen. Ahmed Ramzy of Central Command “gave his orders to prevent protesters from reaching Tahrir Square. The direct order was for each general to deal with protesters according to his own vision of the situation.” Photo Credit: Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters
Read the news story at the LA Times. 

thepoliticalnotebook:

Cairo, Egypt. Anger erupted today as the former dictator returned to court. His appearances, at the order of the judge, are no longer televised. Fighting broke out outside between loyalists and families of those killed in the 18-day revolution while inside lawyers punched one another. Lawyers sent from Kuwait to help defend Mubarak were not allowed to enter the courtroom. During the proceedings, Gen. Hussein Saied Moussa testified that Gen. Ahmed Ramzy of Central Command “gave his orders to prevent protesters from reaching Tahrir Square. The direct order was for each general to deal with protesters according to his own vision of the situation.” Photo Credit: Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters

Read the news story at the LA Times

(via latimes)

21:46 // 2 years ago
August 22, 2011
washingtonpoststyle:

theatlantic:

Qaddafi with Mubarak and Ben Ali, One Year Ago

 
Taken less than a year before, the photo captured the ear-to-ear smiles of the leaders of several autocratic regimes. At the center of the photo stood Gaddafi, smiling and resplendent in his golden-brown robes and trademark sunglasses.
To his far left stood then-Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, laughing, and looking for all the world like he was invincible. To his right stood then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, with Gaddafi’s elbow jauntily on his soldier.

 
Via The Washington Post

Via us.

Saleh’s in there too! It’s like the genesis of the Arab Spring, in a single room.

washingtonpoststyle:

theatlantic:

Qaddafi with Mubarak and Ben Ali, One Year Ago

Taken less than a year before, the photo captured the ear-to-ear smiles of the leaders of several autocratic regimes. At the center of the photo stood Gaddafi, smiling and resplendent in his golden-brown robes and trademark sunglasses.

To his far left stood then-Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, laughing, and looking for all the world like he was invincible. To his right stood then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, with Gaddafi’s elbow jauntily on his soldier.

Via The Washington Post

Via us.

Saleh’s in there too! It’s like the genesis of the Arab Spring, in a single room.

(via nightline)

10:55 // 2 years ago
August 3, 2011
Hosni Mubarak trial begins on not exactly the best of terms
You’re seeing correctly. That is former Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak, in a cage. He’s actually standing trial from a cage, and he’s in a hospital bed. His trial started today, and it’s surprising a lot of Egyptians, who figured he’d use health problems as an excuse to not show up. Mubarak has denied all of the charges against him. We’ll be careful not to drop a reference to The Smashing Pumpkins’ “Bullet With Butterfly Wings” in here. source
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You’re seeing correctly. That is former Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak, in a cage. He’s actually standing trial from a cage, and he’s in a hospital bed. His trial started today, and it’s surprising a lot of Egyptians, who figured he’d use health problems as an excuse to not show up. Mubarak has denied all of the charges against him. We’ll be careful not to drop a reference to The Smashing Pumpkins’ “Bullet With Butterfly Wings” in here. source

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14:25 // 2 years ago
June 20, 2011

Report: Mubarak is having major health problems

Former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak might have stomach cancer. It’s not set in stone, but his defense lawyer says that there’s significant evidence that Mubarak, 83, might have the disease. He’s already been in the hospital for heart troubles, as well as surgery to have his gallbladder and part of his pancreas removed. He’s supposed to go on trial August 3 for killing the protesters who forced him to leave office — but his compounding health issues could put a major crimp in that. source

15:17 // 2 years ago
June 1, 2011
9:42 // 2 years ago
May 28, 2011

Hosni Mubarak has to pay huge fine for Egypt Internet shutdown

  • $90 million the amount Hosni Mubarak and other Egyptian leaders were fined for their role in shutting down Internet and mobile phone service for five days
  • $34 million the size of the fine Mubarak has to pay personally, an amount that has to be paid immediately to the country’s national treasury source

» A fine still owed, appeal or not? The fine, which the judge ordered must be paid now, still must be paid even if Mubarak and the other defendants appeal the decision. Legal analyst Aly Hassan puts it as such: ”The court ordered an immediate payment and the fine may be increased by the state if the damages increase during the year as compensation for lost revenue.” When Egypt’s Internet went down in January, it was an unprecedented event on the world stage — never before had anyone thought that a political leader had the power to shut the whole thing down.

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14:02 // 2 years ago