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June 24, 2013
When it comes to our relations to Hong Kong and China…we see this as a setback in terms of their efforts to build mutual trust and our concerns are pretty clearly stated.
Jay Carney • Criticizing the semi-autonomous government of Hong Kong for allowing Edward Snowden to board a flight to Russia on Monday. The White House spokesman denied claims by Hong Kong officials that the decision to let Snowden leave was a technical one, saying government officials were given plenty of time to address any/all issues they found with the United States’ extradition request. Meanwhile, Snowden was busy giving the slip to 20-30 reporters who now find themselves on a 12-hour flight from Moscow to Havana, Cuba without Snowden on board.
14:52 // 1 year ago
June 23, 2013
As the HKSA Government has yet to have sufficient information to process the request for provisional warrant of arrest, there is no legal basis to restrict Mr Snowden from leaving Hong Kong… Meanwhile, the HKSAR Government has formally written to the US Government requesting clarification on earlier reports about the hacking of computer systems in Hong Kong by US government agencies.
A press release from Hong Kong on the departure of Edward Snowden. Apparently, US requests that Snowden be arrested “did not fully comply with the legal requirements under Hong Kong law,” so HK asked for “additional information,” which they never received. By Hong Kong’s account, the US essentially failed to fill out the proper paperwork, and thus let Snowden slip from its fingers. It’ll probably be a while until we know whether this account of events is true, but that reference at the end to Snowden’s allegation that the US is hacking Hong Kong computers seems just a bit intentionally combative, doesn’t it? source
15:38 // 1 year ago

Edward Snowden to seek political asylum in Ecuador

That’s the Ecuadorian foreign minister on the bottom. So does this mean Snowden isn’t going to Cuba or Venezuela anymore? Or perhaps he is going to land in one of those countries, but only en route to Ecuador? And what happened to Iceland? This already-fascinating story is getting moreso by the hour. Also, we spent far too many hours playing and watching “Where In The World Is Carmen Sandiego?" as kids, so in a sense, we’ve been preparing for this story for the last twenty years.

15:19 // 1 year ago
Edward Snowden, world traveler: On Sunday, it was revealed that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden left Hong Kong and is currently in the Moscow airport, after which he is likely to globe-hop a couple more times—first to Cuba and then to Venezuela. As Snowden does not have a Russian visa, he won’t be leaving the airport anytime soon, which means he better get acquainted with the food court while he’s waiting. Meanwhile, one of the guys he offered up his information to, The Guardian journalist and commentator Glenn Greenwald, faced an embarrassing line of questions from Meet the Press host David Gregory, who actually asked Greenwald this: ”To the extent that you have aided and abetted Snowden, even in his current movements, why shouldn’t you, Mr. Greenwald, be charged with a crime?” Great defense of journalism there, David. (Photo by Vincent Yu/Associated Press)

Edward Snowden, world traveler: On Sunday, it was revealed that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden left Hong Kong and is currently in the Moscow airport, after which he is likely to globe-hop a couple more times—first to Cuba and then to Venezuela. As Snowden does not have a Russian visa, he won’t be leaving the airport anytime soon, which means he better get acquainted with the food court while he’s waiting. Meanwhile, one of the guys he offered up his information to, The Guardian journalist and commentator Glenn Greenwald, faced an embarrassing line of questions from Meet the Press host David Gregory, who actually asked Greenwald this: ”To the extent that you have aided and abetted Snowden, even in his current movements, why shouldn’t you, Mr. Greenwald, be charged with a crime?” Great defense of journalism there, David. (Photo by Vincent Yu/Associated Press)

12:09 // 1 year ago
June 22, 2013
We believe that the charges presented, present a good case for extradition under the treaty, the extradition treaty between the United States and Hong Kong. Hong Kong has been a historically good partner of the United States in law enforcement matters, and we expect them to comply with the treaty in this case.
White House National Security Adviser Tom Donilon • Speaking on, and perhaps applying rhetorical pressure to authorities in Hong Kong, where NSA leaker Edward Snowden fled following his release of classified information regarding U.S. surveillance programs. As we mentioned earlier, there have been rumblings that some aligned with Wikileaks would like to transport Snowden to Iceland, an official of which has stated there have been “informal talks” of granting him asylum. However, whether this happens or not is yet unclear. The only thing that is clear about Snowden’s situation to date is that the U.S. government is chomping at the bit to track him down, placing him in the unenviable situation of needing to find a foreign state willing to say “no” to the most powerful nation on Earth. source
15:20 // 1 year ago
June 17, 2013

BREAKING: Passenger on Hong Kong to US flight claims to have poisoned every person on board

poorrichardsnews:

Thankfully, the passenger has been restrained and there don’t appear to be any signs that he successfully poisoned anyone.

from ABC News:

A Newark-bound United Airlines flight is carrying a passenger who reportedly informed the crew that he “poisoned everyone on board.”

United Flight 116, from Hong Kong, is set to land at 1:30 p.m.

The passenger is being restrained by other passengers.

Law enforcement officials in New York and Washington, D.C., are aware of the incident and are responding.

There is no evidence that passengers have been poisoned, and officials believe the man who made the claim is emotionally disturbed.

read the rest

I will update this story with any new developments.

Crazy stuff right there. Definitely not something you’d want to deal with on a flight.

12:35 // 1 year ago
June 11, 2013

How does Hong Kong rate on extraditions?

  • 47 extraditions from Hong Kong to the U.S.. since 2003, the 18th highest figure of the 137 nations who have participated in extradition throughout that period. Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who leaked classified details of widespread data surveillance of American citizens, fled to Hong Kong in an attempt to avoid prosecution by the U.S. government, but as the above figure demonstrates, whether the gamble will pay off is yet very uncertain. source
18:56 // 1 year ago
June 9, 2013
I’m willing to sacrifice all of that because I can’t in good conscience allow the U.S. government to destroy privacy, internet freedom and basic liberties for people around the world with this massive surveillance machine they’re secretly building.
Edward Snowden, 2013 NSA whistleblower (via patrickdehahn)

Why is he going public now? Simple: "On May 20, he boarded a flight to Hong Kong, where he has remained ever since. He chose the city because ‘they have a spirited commitment to free speech and the right of political dissent’, and because he believed that it was one of the few places in the world that both could and would resist the dictates of the US government."

In other words, he went somewhere the government wouldn’t be able to touch him, supposedly.
15:12 // 1 year ago
February 24, 2013

Need some inspiration? Take some from Fauja Singh, a 101-year-old Indian man who ran a 10K in Hong Kong over the weekend. He finished the 10-kilometer run in one hour, 32 minutes, 28 seconds. He’s hanging up his running shoes after this, but he might as well, because he’s most likely the oldest person to ever finish a race this long. No topping that. 

EDIT: Modified to note that he ran a 10K, not a marathon. Sorry about that.

15:13 // 1 year ago
October 4, 2012
22:33 // 1 year ago