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May 28, 2014
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How Officials Tried to Censor One of the Biggest Stories in the World (via The Atlantic)

When Germany surrendered in World War II, military leaders told reporters to keep it a secret. They might have been successful, too, if not for one rogue journalist.


He lost his job over it, too. What a badass.

digg:

How Officials Tried to Censor One of the Biggest Stories in the World (via The Atlantic)

When Germany surrendered in World War II, military leaders told reporters to keep it a secret. They might have been successful, too, if not for one rogue journalist.

He lost his job over it, too. What a badass.

13:45 // 3 months ago
February 11, 2014

German officials discover more paintings stolen by Nazi-era art dealer

  • 1,406 pieces of art from some of the world’s greatest painters were recovered from the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, son of Nazi-era art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, after a raid by German police back in 2012. Since recovering the works, authorities have confirmed that 380 of the paintings were confiscated by the Nazis, and that number could increase as investigations of each piece continue.. 
  • 60 more paintings were recovered from Gurlitt’s second home, including works by Picasso, Monet and Renoir, leading to calls for more transparency from the German government as it continues cataloging the hundreds of paintings discovered in the last two years. Officials say a preliminary investigation of the new collection has not revealed any works confirmed stolen by the Nazis, but Gurlitt’s lawyer says his client is willing to discuss returns and/or compensation with those who believe they have a claim to one or more of the paintings. source
15:18 // 7 months ago
November 21, 2013
15:45 // 10 months ago
November 20, 2013
15:14 // 10 months ago
November 17, 2013

A time lapse video of all 2053 nuclear explosions from 1945 to 1998. Just watch. It also interestingly puts the nuclear arms race into perspective. 

14:18 // 10 months ago
August 28, 2013
Thousands have gathered at the Lincoln Memorial today, to honor the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s historic “I Have A Dream” speech. President Obama is scheduled to address the assembled crowds at roughly 3pm EST, and you can catch his (and others’) remarks online via livestreams from The Telegraph and other outlets. (Photo via LA Times)

Thousands have gathered at the Lincoln Memorial today, to honor the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s historic “I Have A Dream” speech. President Obama is scheduled to address the assembled crowds at roughly 3pm EST, and you can catch his (and others’) remarks online via livestreams from The Telegraph and other outlets. (Photo via LA Times)

14:54 // 1 year ago
August 19, 2013

Dickey Baker is a son of the Shenandoahs: born, raised and firmly rooted. He talks country-slow, as if each sentence is a chess move requiring careful deliberation. “It’s a pretty place,” he says of the verdant meadows and mountains that surround him. “I’ve left a few times but always come back.”
Baker — a hefty man with a ruddy complexion and pompadour gone gray — has been a Shenandoah National Park maintenance worker for 43 years. He walks to the rear of a cabin at the Skyland campground and gazes across the ruffled landscape he loves. Page Valley tosses and turns directly below. It’s a beautiful late May day, but Baker describes for me how very different things can be when thick clouds barrel in…

If you’ve got a few minutes, check out the Washington Post’s new profile of Roy Sullivan, the deceased Shenandoah National Park icon who was famously struck by lightning seven times during his 41-year career as a park ranger.

Dickey Baker is a son of the Shenandoahs: born, raised and firmly rooted. He talks country-slow, as if each sentence is a chess move requiring careful deliberation. “It’s a pretty place,” he says of the verdant meadows and mountains that surround him. “I’ve left a few times but always come back.”

Baker — a hefty man with a ruddy complexion and pompadour gone gray — has been a Shenandoah National Park maintenance worker for 43 years. He walks to the rear of a cabin at the Skyland campground and gazes across the ruffled landscape he loves. Page Valley tosses and turns directly below. It’s a beautiful late May day, but Baker describes for me how very different things can be when thick clouds barrel in…

If you’ve got a few minutes, check out the Washington Post’s new profile of Roy Sullivan, the deceased Shenandoah National Park icon who was famously struck by lightning seven times during his 41-year career as a park ranger.

(Source: Washington Post)

18:51 // 1 year ago
April 21, 2013
So the new George W. Bush Presidential Library, opening this week, includes an interesting feature: An interactive section that allows visitors to decide for themselves if the decisions Bush made were the right ones, based on input from virtual “advisers.” In other words, Bush’s little way of giving himself a second chance in the eyes of the public. (ht @pbump)

So the new George W. Bush Presidential Library, opening this week, includes an interesting feature: An interactive section that allows visitors to decide for themselves if the decisions Bush made were the right ones, based on input from virtual “advisers.” In other words, Bush’s little way of giving himself a second chance in the eyes of the public. (ht @pbump)

11:30 // 1 year ago
February 14, 2013

River Phoenix’s last movie is headed to the silver screen after decades of waiting

  • 20 years after the death of River Phoenix, the deceased actor’s last movie finally made its international debut at the Berlin International Film Festival on Thursday. The late actor, and older brother of Joaquin Phoenix, died of a drug overdose only 10 days before “Dark Blood” completed filming in 1993, leaving vital portions of the movie unfinished. It’s unknown if there are currently plans for a DVD/Blu-Ray release of the film at this time. source
16:04 // 1 year ago
January 23, 2013
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany”
Hans Massaquoi was very disappointed when his teacher told him that he could not join the Hitler Youth. Massaquoi’s friends had all joined and he was enthralled with the uniforms, the parades, the camp-outs. But Hans’ desire to join was trumped by the color of his skin.
Born in 1926, Mr. Massaquoi’s parents were a German nurse and the son of a Liberian diplomat. He would grow up in Hamburg as the Weimar Republic was collapsing and the the Third Reich was building up.
When he was in second grade, Mr. Massaquoi was so taken with the Nazi imagery that, at his request, his nanny sewed a swastika to his sweater. Although his mother removed it when he returned home from school, a picture had already been taken. (See above.)
Mr. Massaquoi’s family lived in Germany for the duration of the war. According to Mr. Massaquoi’s memoir, Destined to Witness, he theorized that there were so few blacks living in Germany that they were a low priority for extermination. Eventually he would move: first to his father’s home country of Liberia and later to Chicago.
In the United States, although trained in aviation mechanics, Mr. Massaquoi would become a writer for Jet magazine and eventual move to its sister publication, Ebony, where he became managing editor.
Mr. Massaquoi, who passed away on January 19, 2013 on his 87th birthday, was encouraged to write down the story of his unusual childhood by his friend and author of Roots, Alex Haley.
Sources: L.A. Times and Chicago Sun-Times
(Image is from Mr. Massaqoui’s collection and copyright of William Morrow Paperbacks via spiritosanto.wordpress.com)

Fascinating story. Fascinating life. And a photo that sticks with you.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany”

Hans Massaquoi was very disappointed when his teacher told him that he could not join the Hitler Youth. Massaquoi’s friends had all joined and he was enthralled with the uniforms, the parades, the camp-outs. But Hans’ desire to join was trumped by the color of his skin.

Born in 1926, Mr. Massaquoi’s parents were a German nurse and the son of a Liberian diplomat. He would grow up in Hamburg as the Weimar Republic was collapsing and the the Third Reich was building up.

When he was in second grade, Mr. Massaquoi was so taken with the Nazi imagery that, at his request, his nanny sewed a swastika to his sweater. Although his mother removed it when he returned home from school, a picture had already been taken. (See above.)

Mr. Massaquoi’s family lived in Germany for the duration of the war. According to Mr. Massaquoi’s memoir, Destined to Witness, he theorized that there were so few blacks living in Germany that they were a low priority for extermination. Eventually he would move: first to his father’s home country of Liberia and later to Chicago.

In the United States, although trained in aviation mechanics, Mr. Massaquoi would become a writer for Jet magazine and eventual move to its sister publication, Ebony, where he became managing editor.

Mr. Massaquoi, who passed away on January 19, 2013 on his 87th birthday, was encouraged to write down the story of his unusual childhood by his friend and author of Roots, Alex Haley.

Sources: L.A. Times and Chicago Sun-Times

(Image is from Mr. Massaqoui’s collection and copyright of William Morrow Paperbacks via spiritosanto.wordpress.com)

Fascinating story. Fascinating life. And a photo that sticks with you.

8:45 // 1 year ago