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March 29, 2013

Three Republicans who aren’t helping the party’s rebranding efforts

  • one Alaska Rep. Don Young, who landed himself in hot water yesterday for casually referring to the “wetbacks” his family used to employ. He’s since apologized—twice—calling it a “poor choice of words.”
  • two North Carolina Governor Pat McCroy, who today, without warning or explanation, closed the state’s Office of Hispanic/Latino Affairs, prompting an angry response from the local Latin American Coalition.
  • three Todd Kincannon, former executive director of the South Carolina GOP, who earlier this week told veteran Mike Prysner—now an anti-war activist—that he “should have come home in a body bag” and expressed his hopes that “the enemy splatters his brain JFK-style.”

To the national party’s credit, Young’s remarks were roundly denounced by Republican leaders, and Kincannon has basically been disowned by the state GOP. But every story like this reaffirms the exact stereotypes the party is working so hard to combat right now, and until the party can get its members under control, even a superficial rebranding is likely to be unsuccessful. The larger issue, though, is whether the Republicans’ electoral base actually wants it to change. The early evidence isn’t very promising. source

18:27 // 1 year ago
February 23, 2013
pewresearch:

While Obama’s job ratings are up at least slightly among many demographic groups, one of the most striking turnarounds over the past year is in the views of Hispanics. Read more.

It’s hard not to assume that the upswing in President Obama’s job approval rating among hispanics relates to the recent push for immigration reform. And though well it may be, it’s worth remembering that immigration isn’t the sole politically-influenced area of hispanic life in America. There’s a panoply of topics before us  — jobs, health care, education, justice, and social issues among them — that animate people across all demographic lines. It’s important not to lose sight of that complexity.

pewresearch:

While Obama’s job ratings are up at least slightly among many demographic groups, one of the most striking turnarounds over the past year is in the views of Hispanics. Read more.

It’s hard not to assume that the upswing in President Obama’s job approval rating among hispanics relates to the recent push for immigration reform. And though well it may be, it’s worth remembering that immigration isn’t the sole politically-influenced area of hispanic life in America. There’s a panoply of topics before us — jobs, health care, education, justice, and social issues among them — that animate people across all demographic lines. It’s important not to lose sight of that complexity.

15:19 // 1 year ago
November 12, 2012
If Republicans do not do better in the Hispanic community, in a few short years Republicans will no longer be the majority party in our state. If that happens, no Republican will ever again win the White House. New York and California are for the foreseeable future unalterably Democrat. If Texas turns bright blue, the Electoral College math is simple. We won’t be talking about Ohio, we won’t be talking about Florida or Virginia, because it won’t matter. If Texas is bright blue, you can’t get to two-seventy electoral votes. The Republican Party would cease to exist. We would become like the Whig Party.
Republican Senator-Elect Ted Cruz • Discussing the GOP’s need for better outreach in Hispanic and Latino communities around the country, but particularly in his home state of Texas. The Lone Star State, and its 38 electoral college votes, remain central to the Republican Party’s presidential election strategy, and its loss could prove insurmountable for the GOP. While no one is suggesting such a flip will happen by 2016 (or even 2020), Cruz’s concerns follow similar comments made by one of former presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s own advisers last week. source
15:38 // 1 year ago
September 23, 2012

Report: Hispanics disproportionately affected by voter ID law changes

  • 10M the number of Hispanic U.S. citizens the civil rights group Advancement Project believes have been disenfranchised due to new laws which could prevent Latinos from registering and voting. The laws include strong restrictions for photo identification for voters, as well as laws that require proof of U.S. citizenship. source
23:31 // 2 years ago
January 25, 2012
Hispanics understand, either personally or through close family members, what it means to come here as an immigrant. They know how hard it is to function without a full working knowledge of English. They have often felt the sting of prejudice and the threats of gang violence. They tire of the stereotypes built by the media and some politicians. Like all voters, Hispanics respond to candidates who show respect and understanding for their experiences.
Jeb Bush • In an Op-Ed for the Washington Post today. The full piece is well worth reading, as it recognizes a fact which has been blindingly obvious to political science types — changing demographics in the American electorate have given Hispanics a much greater influence than ever before, and that trend will almost assuredly continue. This is obviously a big issue for the Republican Party at present — the recent defense of Mitt Romney’s immigration platform by Marco Rubio aside, people generally don’t like being made to feel like their friends, family or possibly themselves are being made targets by political power-players. One way to mend these fences is to speak and listen with earnestly, and build coalitions based on shared ideology. Bush seems to get this. source (viafollow)
20:49 // 2 years ago