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May 15, 2012

Greece headed towards more elections after coalition talks fail

  • cause The Greek elections earlier this month, which were watched closely as a sign of how the public felt about austerity measures, were split very heavily, with once-obscure parties taking big chunks of the vote from established parties.
  • effect With these new parties insisting that a coalition government repeal the unpopular austerity measures, it was tough to find common ground, and as a result, none of the parties could manage to form a coalition government.
  • result “We are going again towards elections, in a few days, under very bad conditions,” Pasok leader Evangelos Venizelos said after a meeting on Wednesday. If Greece can’t form a government,  it will likely run out of money by July. source

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10:50 // 2 years ago
November 6, 2011
We only have to wait for the prime minister’s announcements in the cabinet. Everything must be done within the day, otherwise tomorrow it will be hell.
Greek politician Telemachos Hitiris • Discussing the expected plans for the Greek government, which just had a prime minister survive a no-confidence vote. The plan now will be to come up with an interim coalition government to replace Prime Minister George Papandreou, who could resign as soon as Sunday. It’s been a weird week in Greek politics, in case you haven’t been following alongsource (viafollow)
9:21 // 2 years ago
November 4, 2011

Greek PM George Papandreou survives no-confidence vote

  • yeah … After a week full of hand-wringing (he called a referendum on an aid package, then backed off) after months of general annoyance, Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou managed to survive a no-confidence vote on Friday.
  • … but Don’t expect him to remain in power for long; Papandreou reportedly plans to work towards forming a unity government, which he may or may not lead. He says he’s willing to step aside if it’s a good choice for the country. source
19:47 // 2 years ago
November 1, 2011

Stocks hate democracy: Greek PM puts aid package up for referendum

  • cause In a surprising move that threw off the entire world market, Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou said that he would put the country’s aid package up to a public referendum.
  • reaction Stocks worldwide reacted to the news poorly, including the U.S., which fell by more than two percent. The markets were already volatile; the danger of Greek default made things even worse. source
10:25 // 2 years ago
October 5, 2011
Greek austerity protests: Tens of thousands take part in massive strike: Roughly 16,000 people showed up for protests in Athens, and another 10,000 showed up in the northern city of Thessaloniki. The protests are in reaction to expected job cutbacks due to austerity measures. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Greek austerity protests: Tens of thousands take part in massive strike: Roughly 16,000 people showed up for protests in Athens, and another 10,000 showed up in the northern city of Thessaloniki. The protests are in reaction to expected job cutbacks due to austerity measures. source

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11:24 // 2 years ago
June 29, 2011

Greek austerity passes parliament, ensuring international loan

  • 155-138 mostly along party lines source

» Harsh words for the opposition: George Papandreou, the leader of the Socialist Party, had this to say towards the opposition New Democrats in the heat of the all-important vote: “All of Europe knows that your party is responsible for the current situation.” The vote, which only one member of parliament on either side crossed lines for, means that the country will receive a $17 billion rescue plan to make it through the Summer, with a second, much larger one in the works. Meanwhile, outside parliament, large-scale protests continued unabated.

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11:42 // 3 years ago
June 28, 2011

Greeks protest austerity vote; police officers are ready for them

  • 5,000 police officers deployed to deal with mayhem source

» 48-hour general strike called: With Greece facing a difficult austerity vote today, protesters have shown up by the thousands outside of the country’s parliament. The strike has shut down most public services, including transit. Airports and hospitals have also suffered the deep effects of the strikes. The passage of the measures, however, is key — a large loan from the European Union and the International Monetary Fund rests on their passage. If they don’t get it, they risk going into default, which would be very bad.

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10:23 // 3 years ago