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June 17, 2012

Tensions are extremely high ahead of a vote that could shape the future of a country and a currency. In an election with wide implications, the Greek people are holding parliamentary elections are really a proxy battle on the international austerity packages the country is being pushed to take by other international governments. This is actually the second round — a prior May 6 vote effectively created a stalemate due to the rise of the once-obscure Syriza party, which promises to cancel all austerity deals if elected. Above is a clip that explains exactly what’s at stake — the possible break-up of the Eurozone. And below, a couple of notable things that happened so far today:

  • one Pro-austerity and anti-austerity parties are running close, according to one early exit poll. The “pro-Europe” New Democracy party is ahead of Syriza, 29 percent to 27 percent.
  • two There have been reports of Golden Dawn party members standing outside polling stations, looking intimidating. The Neo-Nazi party had a relatively strong showing in the last election.
  • three Two hand grenades were thrown near the headquarters of a Greek television station, Skai. They did not explode. The media group has heavily favored tough austerity measures. source

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10:33 // 2 years ago
May 28, 2012
10:54 // 2 years ago
May 15, 2012

Greece headed towards more elections after coalition talks fail

  • cause The Greek elections earlier this month, which were watched closely as a sign of how the public felt about austerity measures, were split very heavily, with once-obscure parties taking big chunks of the vote from established parties.
  • effect With these new parties insisting that a coalition government repeal the unpopular austerity measures, it was tough to find common ground, and as a result, none of the parties could manage to form a coalition government.
  • result “We are going again towards elections, in a few days, under very bad conditions,” Pasok leader Evangelos Venizelos said after a meeting on Wednesday. If Greece can’t form a government,  it will likely run out of money by July. source

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10:50 // 2 years ago
April 5, 2012
The Greek government has a new problem: A potential martyr. A 77-year-old man who recently recently shot and killed himself in Athens’ Syntagma Square has become a symbol for anti-austerity activists, leading to heavy protests Wednesday, including chants like ”this was no suicide, it was a state-perpetrated murder.” Greece, rocked by a tough state of austerity, has unemployment at 21 percent — higher for young people — and tens of thousands of jobs have been lost.  (Photo: People gather at the site of the man’s shooting. Thanassis Stavrakis/AP)

The Greek government has a new problem: A potential martyr. A 77-year-old man who recently recently shot and killed himself in Athens’ Syntagma Square has become a symbol for anti-austerity activists, leading to heavy protests Wednesday, including chants like ”this was no suicide, it was a state-perpetrated murder.” Greece, rocked by a tough state of austerity, has unemployment at 21 percent — higher for young people — and tens of thousands of jobs have been lost.  (Photo: People gather at the site of the man’s shooting. Thanassis Stavrakis/AP)

10:26 // 2 years ago
February 12, 2012
They’re trying to lay the ground for it, trying to limit the contagion from it.
Center for European Reform Chief Economist Simon Tilford • Discussing the European Union’s struggles with Greece, which could end in default for Greece. If Greece defaults, which may be become more and more likely, the goal is to prevent the default from affecting other countries, to prevent global collapse. The issue is becoming a very difficult one to avoid for the country — to the point where members of each of the major Greek coalition parties have expelled members who did not vote yes on an important austerity measure Sunday. The measure, which needed to pass so the country could continue to get foreign loans, passed 199 to 74, with 27 absentions.
21:21 // 2 years ago
November 6, 2011
We only have to wait for the prime minister’s announcements in the cabinet. Everything must be done within the day, otherwise tomorrow it will be hell.
Greek politician Telemachos Hitiris • Discussing the expected plans for the Greek government, which just had a prime minister survive a no-confidence vote. The plan now will be to come up with an interim coalition government to replace Prime Minister George Papandreou, who could resign as soon as Sunday. It’s been a weird week in Greek politics, in case you haven’t been following alongsource (viafollow)
9:21 // 2 years ago
November 4, 2011

Greek PM George Papandreou survives no-confidence vote

  • yeah … After a week full of hand-wringing (he called a referendum on an aid package, then backed off) after months of general annoyance, Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou managed to survive a no-confidence vote on Friday.
  • … but Don’t expect him to remain in power for long; Papandreou reportedly plans to work towards forming a unity government, which he may or may not lead. He says he’s willing to step aside if it’s a good choice for the country. source
19:47 // 2 years ago
November 1, 2011

Stocks hate democracy: Greek PM puts aid package up for referendum

  • cause In a surprising move that threw off the entire world market, Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou said that he would put the country’s aid package up to a public referendum.
  • reaction Stocks worldwide reacted to the news poorly, including the U.S., which fell by more than two percent. The markets were already volatile; the danger of Greek default made things even worse. source
10:25 // 2 years ago
October 5, 2011
Greek austerity protests: Tens of thousands take part in massive strike: Roughly 16,000 people showed up for protests in Athens, and another 10,000 showed up in the northern city of Thessaloniki. The protests are in reaction to expected job cutbacks due to austerity measures. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Greek austerity protests: Tens of thousands take part in massive strike: Roughly 16,000 people showed up for protests in Athens, and another 10,000 showed up in the northern city of Thessaloniki. The protests are in reaction to expected job cutbacks due to austerity measures. source

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11:24 // 2 years ago
July 3, 2011

Making amends: Greece floats a completely different flotilla idea

  • blocked A couple days back, Greece blocked a flotilla headed towards Gaza from heading out of one of its ports. It understandably drew a lot of controversy from certain quarters of the political sphere — but briefly took attention off the country’s austerity crisis.
  • allowed Now, it seems that Greece is ready to offer up a mea culpa to Palestine — in coordination with the United Nations, they’ll send a ship loaded with aid over to Gaza, which they’ll offer up to the Palestinian Authority — but, as you’ll note, they aren’t working with Hamas. source

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16:39 // 3 years ago