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June 20, 2013
On the hiring side, we found that brainteasers are a complete waste of time. How many golf balls can you fit into an airplane? How many gas stations in Manhattan? A complete waste of time. They don’t predict anything. They serve primarily to make the interviewer feel smart.
Laszlo Bock, senior vice president of people operations at Google, revealing the brain-teasers Google used in an effort to attract smart people failed to actually attract smart people. Now they just hire movie stars for internships.
10:14 // 1 year ago
June 15, 2013
My best effort to explain this whole internet balloon concept Google just floated us.

My best effort to explain this whole internet balloon concept Google just floated us.

0:13 // 1 year ago

Here’s a video from Google describing how this internet balloon thing works. It sounds like it has a lot of moving parts. Should be fun to watch.

0:05 // 1 year ago
June 14, 2013
wired:

Not much happens in Geraldine, a small farming community in the interior of the South Island of New Zealand, about 85 miles from Christchurch. So when Hayden MacKenzie, a fourth-generation farmer there, picked up the phone last Tuesday and got a request to participate in a secret project—one that he wouldn’t even learn about until he signed a vow of silence—he and his wife Anna figured that they’d take a shot. That evening, two men showed up at his cozy farmhouse. They bore a peculiar red device, a sphere slightly bigger than a volleyball perched on a short collar, and attached it to his roof. Then they left.
Only when the men returned the next day did they reveal what they were up to. Inside the red ball was an antenna that would give the MacKenzies Internet access. It was custom-designed to communicate with a similar antenna that would be floating by in the stratosphere, over 60,000 feet above sea level. On a solar-powered balloon.
Oh, and the men work for Google.
[MORE - EXCLUSIVE: How Google Will Use High-Flying Balloons to Deliver Internet to the Hinterlands]

Top that, everything else on the internet tonight.

wired:

Not much happens in Geraldine, a small farming community in the interior of the South Island of New Zealand, about 85 miles from Christchurch. So when Hayden MacKenzie, a fourth-generation farmer there, picked up the phone last Tuesday and got a request to participate in a secret project—one that he wouldn’t even learn about until he signed a vow of silence—he and his wife Anna figured that they’d take a shot. That evening, two men showed up at his cozy farmhouse. They bore a peculiar red device, a sphere slightly bigger than a volleyball perched on a short collar, and attached it to his roof. Then they left.

Only when the men returned the next day did they reveal what they were up to. Inside the red ball was an antenna that would give the MacKenzies Internet access. It was custom-designed to communicate with a similar antenna that would be floating by in the stratosphere, over 60,000 feet above sea level. On a solar-powered balloon.

Oh, and the men work for Google.

[MORE - EXCLUSIVE: How Google Will Use High-Flying Balloons to Deliver Internet to the Hinterlands]

Top that, everything else on the internet tonight.

23:41 // 1 year ago
May 29, 2013

Here’s what Google has in store for the Gmail inbox. By the end of the video, you’ll be asking yourself … “wait, why doesn’t this already exist in my inbox?” This, friends, is Google firing back at Mailbox.

12:38 // 1 year ago
May 4, 2013
We’re changing the name ‘Palestinian Territories’ to ‘Palestine’ across our products. We consult a number of sources and authorities when naming countries. In this case, we are following the lead of the UN, Icann [the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers], ISO [International Organisation for Standardisation] and other international organizations.
Google spokesman Nathan Tyler • Discussing the web giant’s decision to change the name of the Palestinian edition of its search engine to “Google Palestine,” from “Google Palestinian Territories.” While the Palestinian Authority praised the move, which matched the UN’s decision to designate the contested region as a non-member observer state late last year, Israel was less happy about it. “This change raises questions about the reasons behind this surprising involvement of what is basically a private internet company in international politics, and on the controversial side,” said Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman Yigal Palmor.
12:02 // 1 year ago
April 28, 2013
If you ever get Google Glass, don’t follow Robert Scoble’s lead.

If you ever get Google Glass, don’t follow Robert Scoble’s lead.

20:43 // 1 year ago
April 27, 2013
bestrooftalkever:

As if this guy already didn’t have a hard enought time getting laid…

Hurry up new trend, come along so Scoble will get distracted and forget his glasses one day.

bestrooftalkever:

As if this guy already didn’t have a hard enought time getting laid…

Hurry up new trend, come along so Scoble will get distracted and forget his glasses one day.

18:19 // 1 year ago
April 5, 2013
Some pranksters did some work on Sergey Brin’s Tesla Model S, and oh is it magic. (When clicking on the link, crank up this track at the same time.)

Some pranksters did some work on Sergey Brin’s Tesla Model S, and oh is it magic. (When clicking on the link, crank up this track at the same time.)

13:43 // 1 year ago
March 31, 2013
peterfeld:

Cesar Chavez, American hero, born Mar. 31, 1927.
How much do I love that right-wingers are mad at Google for featuring him today instead of Easter! Don’t they remember Jesus said “Render unto Cesar the things which are Cesar’s”?

We celebrate Easter every year. This guy isn’t getting nearly as much press these days. He played a key role for numerous farm workers nationwide. Don’t know about you all, but I’m OK with the Easter Bunny getting a snub this year, especially since:

Fasting was just one expression of his deep spirituality. Like most farmworkers, Chavez was a devout Catholic. His vision of religion was a progressive one, that prefigured the “preferential option for the poor” of liberation theology. In the UFW, the mass was a call to action as well as a rededication of the spirit.

Seems like he was working in the spirit of his religion, rather than merely celebrating it every year.

peterfeld:

Cesar Chavez, American hero, born Mar. 31, 1927.

How much do I love that right-wingers are mad at Google for featuring him today instead of Easter! Don’t they remember Jesus said “Render unto Cesar the things which are Cesar’s”?

We celebrate Easter every year. This guy isn’t getting nearly as much press these days. He played a key role for numerous farm workers nationwide. Don’t know about you all, but I’m OK with the Easter Bunny getting a snub this year, especially since:

Fasting was just one expression of his deep spirituality. Like most farmworkers, Chavez was a devout Catholic. His vision of religion was a progressive one, that prefigured the “preferential option for the poor” of liberation theology. In the UFW, the mass was a call to action as well as a rededication of the spirit.

Seems like he was working in the spirit of his religion, rather than merely celebrating it every year.

9:54 // 1 year ago