The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

August 19, 2013
I felt we were actually a company now, and not a Stanford research project, that this thing was really happening.
Google “first employee” Craig Silverstein • Discussing his experience with the company—in this particular case, how big a deal it was that the company moved out of the dorms and into a friend’s home. Google got a lot bigger from there, and Silverstein spent 14 years there, only leaving last year to take on a role with a nonprofit organization.
10:46 // 8 months ago
August 5, 2013
futurejournalismproject:

What Google Knows
Via the Wall Street Journal:

Every hour, an active Google user can generate hundreds or thousands of data “events” that Google stores in its computers, said people familiar with its data-gathering process.
These include when people use Google’s array of Web and mobile-device services, which have long collected information about what individuals are privately searching for on the Web. It includes the videos they watch on YouTube, which gets more than one billion visitors a month; phone calls they’ve made using Google Voice and through nearly one billion Google-powered Android smartphones; and messages they send via Android phones or through Gmail, which has more than 425 million users.
If a user signs in to his or her Google account to use Gmail and other services, the information collected grows and is connected to the name associated with the account. Google can log information about the addresses of websites that person visits after doing Google searches.
Even if the person visits sites without first searching for them on Google, the company can collect many of the website addresses people using Google’s Chrome Web browser or if they visit one of millions of sites that have pieces of Google code, such as its “+1” button, installed.
Android-based phones and Google Maps can collect information about people’s location over time. Google also has credit-card information for more than 200 million Android-device owners who have purchased mobile apps, digital books or music, said a person with direct knowledge of the matter.

Somewhat related bonus: The Public-Private Surveillance Partnership, via Bloomberg.
Image: What Google Knows, via the Wall Street Journal. Select to embiggen.

What Google knows about you could fill a data center.

futurejournalismproject:

What Google Knows

Via the Wall Street Journal:

Every hour, an active Google user can generate hundreds or thousands of data “events” that Google stores in its computers, said people familiar with its data-gathering process.

These include when people use Google’s array of Web and mobile-device services, which have long collected information about what individuals are privately searching for on the Web. It includes the videos they watch on YouTube, which gets more than one billion visitors a month; phone calls they’ve made using Google Voice and through nearly one billion Google-powered Android smartphones; and messages they send via Android phones or through Gmail, which has more than 425 million users.

If a user signs in to his or her Google account to use Gmail and other services, the information collected grows and is connected to the name associated with the account. Google can log information about the addresses of websites that person visits after doing Google searches.

Even if the person visits sites without first searching for them on Google, the company can collect many of the website addresses people using Google’s Chrome Web browser or if they visit one of millions of sites that have pieces of Google code, such as its “+1” button, installed.

Android-based phones and Google Maps can collect information about people’s location over time. Google also has credit-card information for more than 200 million Android-device owners who have purchased mobile apps, digital books or music, said a person with direct knowledge of the matter.

Somewhat related bonus: The Public-Private Surveillance Partnership, via Bloomberg.

Image: What Google Knows, via the Wall Street Journal. Select to embiggen.

What Google knows about you could fill a data center.

11:37 // 8 months ago
June 26, 2013
evanfleischer:

Well played, Google.

Clever.

evanfleischer:

Well played, Google.

Clever.

10:43 // 10 months ago
June 20, 2013
21:12 // 10 months ago
On the hiring side, we found that brainteasers are a complete waste of time. How many golf balls can you fit into an airplane? How many gas stations in Manhattan? A complete waste of time. They don’t predict anything. They serve primarily to make the interviewer feel smart.
Laszlo Bock, senior vice president of people operations at Google, revealing the brain-teasers Google used in an effort to attract smart people failed to actually attract smart people. Now they just hire movie stars for internships.
10:14 // 10 months ago
June 15, 2013
My best effort to explain this whole internet balloon concept Google just floated us.

My best effort to explain this whole internet balloon concept Google just floated us.

0:13 // 10 months ago

Here’s a video from Google describing how this internet balloon thing works. It sounds like it has a lot of moving parts. Should be fun to watch.

0:05 // 10 months ago
June 14, 2013
wired:

Not much happens in Geraldine, a small farming community in the interior of the South Island of New Zealand, about 85 miles from Christchurch. So when Hayden MacKenzie, a fourth-generation farmer there, picked up the phone last Tuesday and got a request to participate in a secret project—one that he wouldn’t even learn about until he signed a vow of silence—he and his wife Anna figured that they’d take a shot. That evening, two men showed up at his cozy farmhouse. They bore a peculiar red device, a sphere slightly bigger than a volleyball perched on a short collar, and attached it to his roof. Then they left.
Only when the men returned the next day did they reveal what they were up to. Inside the red ball was an antenna that would give the MacKenzies Internet access. It was custom-designed to communicate with a similar antenna that would be floating by in the stratosphere, over 60,000 feet above sea level. On a solar-powered balloon.
Oh, and the men work for Google.
[MORE - EXCLUSIVE: How Google Will Use High-Flying Balloons to Deliver Internet to the Hinterlands]

Top that, everything else on the internet tonight.

wired:

Not much happens in Geraldine, a small farming community in the interior of the South Island of New Zealand, about 85 miles from Christchurch. So when Hayden MacKenzie, a fourth-generation farmer there, picked up the phone last Tuesday and got a request to participate in a secret project—one that he wouldn’t even learn about until he signed a vow of silence—he and his wife Anna figured that they’d take a shot. That evening, two men showed up at his cozy farmhouse. They bore a peculiar red device, a sphere slightly bigger than a volleyball perched on a short collar, and attached it to his roof. Then they left.

Only when the men returned the next day did they reveal what they were up to. Inside the red ball was an antenna that would give the MacKenzies Internet access. It was custom-designed to communicate with a similar antenna that would be floating by in the stratosphere, over 60,000 feet above sea level. On a solar-powered balloon.

Oh, and the men work for Google.

[MORE - EXCLUSIVE: How Google Will Use High-Flying Balloons to Deliver Internet to the Hinterlands]

Top that, everything else on the internet tonight.

23:41 // 10 months ago
May 29, 2013

Here’s what Google has in store for the Gmail inbox. By the end of the video, you’ll be asking yourself … “wait, why doesn’t this already exist in my inbox?” This, friends, is Google firing back at Mailbox.

12:38 // 11 months ago
May 4, 2013
We’re changing the name ‘Palestinian Territories’ to ‘Palestine’ across our products. We consult a number of sources and authorities when naming countries. In this case, we are following the lead of the UN, Icann [the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers], ISO [International Organisation for Standardisation] and other international organizations.
Google spokesman Nathan Tyler • Discussing the web giant’s decision to change the name of the Palestinian edition of its search engine to “Google Palestine,” from “Google Palestinian Territories.” While the Palestinian Authority praised the move, which matched the UN’s decision to designate the contested region as a non-member observer state late last year, Israel was less happy about it. “This change raises questions about the reasons behind this surprising involvement of what is basically a private internet company in international politics, and on the controversial side,” said Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman Yigal Palmor.
12:02 // 11 months ago