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June 12, 2011
The motto of the foundation is that every life has equal value. There are more people dying of malaria than any specific cancer. When you die of malaria aged three it’s different from being in your seventies, when you might die of a heart attack or you might die of cancer. And the world is putting massive amounts into cancer, so my wealth would have had a meaningless impact on that.
Bill Gates • Discussing his philanthropy organization, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and why it chooses to focus on malaria over cancer. Gates, the world’s second-richest man, doesn’t give a lot of interviews, but when he does, he makes them count. In this Daily Mail piece, he avoids focusing too much on his past and more on what he’s doing now — working to ensure his money gets used in ways that can positively affect people’s lives. His 85-year-old dad even helps. And he doesn’t do it from a distance, either: “It is important to see places. When you go into a ward with kids who have cholera, it’s horrific. They are losing their vital fluids and their brains are shutting down. As a father, as a human, it’s just horrific.” Gates’ work as a philanthropist could one day overshadow his work with Microsoft. It’s that important. source (viafollow)
20:31 // 2 years ago
20:01 // 2 years ago
Steel is what we would call a ‘mature technology.’ We’d like to think we know most everything about it. If someone invented a way to strengthen the strongest steels even a few percent, that would be a big deal. But 7 percent? That’s huge.
Ohio State professor and engineer Suresh Babu • Discussing a Detroit-based DIY dude’s method of creating a stronger type of steel. The technology, called Flash Bainite, was made by Gary Cola, a metal hacker who managed to figure out a way to cook really strong steel in a matter of seconds — ten to be exact. Babu was skeptical, as you might guess. ”The process that Gary described – it shouldn’t have worked,” he said. “I didn’t believe him. So he took my students and me to Detroit.” We expect Apple to use this technology in their next iPhone, just because.
15:10 // 2 years ago
A baboon and a bush baby, together at last: At the Nairobi Animal Orphanage in Kenya, an orphaned bush baby has a new dad: This seven-month old baboon. “This is not normal. It has not happened here and I guess it has not happened anywhere else,” notes the animal home’s warden, Edward Kariuki. These kind of unlikely animal kingdom duos are rare but not completely unheard of in Kenya: For example, a baby hippo and a giant tortoise created an unlikely friendship after the hippo was washed out to sea during the southeast Asia Tsunami. We smell a Dreamworks movie!

A baboon and a bush baby, together at last: At the Nairobi Animal Orphanage in Kenya, an orphaned bush baby has a new dad: This seven-month old baboon. “This is not normal. It has not happened here and I guess it has not happened anywhere else,” notes the animal home’s warden, Edward Kariuki. These kind of unlikely animal kingdom duos are rare but not completely unheard of in Kenya: For example, a baby hippo and a giant tortoise created an unlikely friendship after the hippo was washed out to sea during the southeast Asia Tsunami. We smell a Dreamworks movie!

12:26 // 2 years ago
apsies:

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets farmers of the Upendo Women’s Cooperative group on June 12, 2011 in Mlandizi, Tanzania.

Remember guys, for every double-background story the New York Times runs about some shadowy meeting that Hillary Clinton was involved in, she gets to take part in a cheerful photo like this one.

apsies:

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets farmers of the Upendo Women’s Cooperative group on June 12, 2011 in Mlandizi, Tanzania.

Remember guys, for every double-background story the New York Times runs about some shadowy meeting that Hillary Clinton was involved in, she gets to take part in a cheerful photo like this one.

11:58 // 2 years ago