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February 5, 2013

Congratulations, AmericaYou just rewarded a company that came up with the worst Super Bowl ad of the season.

11:38 // 1 year ago
December 29, 2011
We have observed a spike in domain name transfers, which are running above normal rates and which we attribute to GoDaddy’s prior support for SOPA, which was reversed. GoDaddy opposes SOPA because the legislation has not fulfilled its basic requirement to build a consensus among stake-holders in the technology and Internet communities. Our company regrets the loss of any of our customers, who remain our highest priority, and we hope to repair those relationships and win back their business over time.
GoDaddy CEO Warren Adelman • In a statement sent to the press on Domain Transfer Day, an anti-SOPA protest organized after it became clear that GoDaddy was a major supporter of the legislation. Note the phrasing — they don’t just not support SOPA, but oppose it. Think they’ve apologized enough?
21:56 // 2 years ago
Anyone else move their service away from GoDaddy today?

Anyone else move their service away from GoDaddy today?

(via buzzfeed)

12:26 // 2 years ago
December 23, 2011
I think that the backlash against their support was a lot more swift and severe than they’d anticipated. Their initially glib ‘lol, whatever’ response was replaced by ‘oh god, please stop punching us in the quarterly financial report!’ real fast.
Mashable chief architect Chris Heald • Discussing how he received a call from GoDaddy regarding his decision to move 50+ domains to a different service in a boycott of their now-reversed stance on SOPA. Apparently he wasn’t alone. So the real question, then, is whether it’s too late for GoDaddy to get all those customers back. Based on the fact that Heald isn’t budging, and the fact that they called two days before Christmas, signs aren’t looking good for the company. source (viafollow)
20:12 // 2 years ago
Good work, Internet: GoDaddy has rescinded their support of SOPA. ”Fighting online piracy is of the utmost importance, which is why GoDaddy has been working to help craft revisions to this legislation - but we can clearly do better,” said Warren Adelman, GoDaddy’s CEO. “It’s very important that all Internet stakeholders work together on this. Getting it right is worth the wait. GoDaddy will support it when and if the Internet community supports it.” The company says it had been working closely with its general counsel, Christine Jones, on hepling to mold and revise the legislation — prior to now.

Good work, Internet: GoDaddy has rescinded their support of SOPA. ”Fighting online piracy is of the utmost importance, which is why GoDaddy has been working to help craft revisions to this legislation - but we can clearly do better,” said Warren Adelman, GoDaddy’s CEO. “It’s very important that all Internet stakeholders work together on this. Getting it right is worth the wait. GoDaddy will support it when and if the Internet community supports it.” The company says it had been working closely with its general counsel, Christine Jones, on hepling to mold and revise the legislation — prior to now.

14:17 // 2 years ago

More on GoDaddy and the SOPA boycott

joost5 says: Most of the Redditors responding to the boycott are tech-savvy and ready. GoDaddy will end up feeling the sting of being on the wrong side of this issue. But even if they don’t respond, leaving GoDaddy is the right thing to do.

» SFB says: Yep, that’s exactly true, and they certainly will. But ultimately, your first point is the most salient: People who post at sites like Reddit or Hacker News are on a whole more likely to be aware of issues like this. Those aren’t the people who need to be reached, however. The people who need to be reached are the ones who are more likely to see Danica Patrick’s car on TV than a meme from Reddit. They don’t know what SOPA is, and if they did, they might understand the larger issue enough to boycott. Remember, 50 million domains go through GoDaddy; they can stand to lose a few thousand if it helps their bottom line. — Ernie @ SFB

1:36 // 2 years ago
December 22, 2011
GoDaddy faces all-out boycott over stated SOPA support
Not a good day to be Danica Patrick. Spurred on by a Reddit thread earlier today (we mentioned it here), a snowballing boycott against the world’s largest domain registar has picked up such tech-industry luminaries as Cheezburger Inc.’s Ben Huh and Y Combinator’s Paul Graham. And Graham’s Hacker News is currently loaded with GoDaddy-related posts tonight, including this post about how to extricate yourself from GoDaddy’s service. But while the movement is certainly noble, it’s one that could face a lot of trouble going forward. Here’s a quick summary of the challenges boycotters may face going forward:
Why they support SOPA GoDaddy has been one of the more vocal supporters of SOPA, as a statement they submitted to the House of Representatives makes clear: “As much as some would like to paint a bleak picture, this debate is not about Hollywood vs. Silicon Valley. This debate is about preserving, protecting, and creating American jobs and protecting American consumers from the dangers that they face on-line.”
Prone to controversy GoDaddy doesn’t exactly have the most pristine reputation among tech companies (what with its scantily-clad commercials and elephant-hunting CEO), but it hasn’t hurt their service in the past. Why? Quick — name another company that sells domains off the top of your head. Most people probably can’t. That’s what might hurt this boycott amongst mainstream users.
An uphill battle? GoDaddy users face a very similar situation to PayPal or Craigslist or Internet Explorer— no matter how controversial, user-unfriendly, or outdated the service may get, the market leader is seated pretty firmly due to years of market recognition and popularity, and it’ll take a lot to shake them. GoDaddy’s offered annoyed users a good reason to move elsewhere, however. But how many will there be? source
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Not a good day to be Danica Patrick. Spurred on by a Reddit thread earlier today (we mentioned it here), a snowballing boycott against the world’s largest domain registar has picked up such tech-industry luminaries as Cheezburger Inc.’s Ben Huh and Y Combinator’s Paul Graham. And Graham’s Hacker News is currently loaded with GoDaddy-related posts tonight, including this post about how to extricate yourself from GoDaddy’s service. But while the movement is certainly noble, it’s one that could face a lot of trouble going forward. Here’s a quick summary of the challenges boycotters may face going forward:

  • Why they support SOPA GoDaddy has been one of the more vocal supporters of SOPA, as a statement they submitted to the House of Representatives makes clear: “As much as some would like to paint a bleak picture, this debate is not about Hollywood vs. Silicon Valley. This debate is about preserving, protecting, and creating American jobs and protecting American consumers from the dangers that they face on-line.”
  • Prone to controversy GoDaddy doesn’t exactly have the most pristine reputation among tech companies (what with its scantily-clad commercials and elephant-hunting CEO), but it hasn’t hurt their service in the past. Why? Quick — name another company that sells domains off the top of your head. Most people probably can’t. That’s what might hurt this boycott amongst mainstream users.
  • An uphill battle? GoDaddy users face a very similar situation to PayPal or Craigslist or Internet Explorer— no matter how controversial, user-unfriendly, or outdated the service may get, the market leader is seated pretty firmly due to years of market recognition and popularity, and it’ll take a lot to shake them. GoDaddy’s offered annoyed users a good reason to move elsewhere, however. But how many will there be? source

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23:20 // 2 years ago
Three ways Web sites and users have been protesting SOPA
People upset with the Stop Online Piracy Act have a small reason to cheer this morning. The anti-piracy bill, which many Internet users feel could have a chilling effect on the Web, got tabled until early next year, giving a brief respite and an opportunity for alternative bills (such as Rep. Darrell Issa’s OPEN act) to gain footing. Being a creative bunch, many users have taken to design tricks, boycotts, even music to protest what they feel is a dangerous bill. Here are just a few examples of SOPA protests online:
one Scribd, taking a bit of a cue from Tumblr but even more ambitiously, made the articles on their site disappear yesterday, word by word.
two A number of Reddit users have begun a movement to move domains away from GoDaddy en masse, in protest of their support of SOPA.
threeLeah Kauffman, the  songwriter who wrote “I Got a Crush on Obama,” just released an anti-SOPA protest song titled “Firewall.”
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People upset with the Stop Online Piracy Act have a small reason to cheer this morning. The anti-piracy bill, which many Internet users feel could have a chilling effect on the Web, got tabled until early next year, giving a brief respite and an opportunity for alternative bills (such as Rep. Darrell Issa’s OPEN act) to gain footing. Being a creative bunch, many users have taken to design tricks, boycotts, even music to protest what they feel is a dangerous bill. Here are just a few examples of SOPA protests online:

Follow ShortFormBlog

11:18 // 2 years ago
December 6, 2011
11:08 // 2 years ago
July 1, 2011

Domain registar GoDaddy sells itself for a freaking lot of money

  • $2.25 billion to a private equity firm; whoa daddy source

» Big business in cheap domains: Why so much? Well, GoDaddy’s role as the most popular registar online means the company drives huge revenues — they’re expected to top $1.1 billion this year.

22:37 // 3 years ago