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March 30, 2014
When Zain Abidin Mohammed Husain Abu Zubaydah and Muhammad Shams al-Sawalha were teenagers, they scoured record shops in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, desperately trying to track down the video for “Billie Jean,” the latest single from Michael Jackson’s global smash album “Thriller.” Sawalha and everyone else knew his friend as Hani, who was a huge fan of Jackson and would sometimes “dance foolishly” when Sawalha put a cassette of the King of Pop’s music into a tape deck. Eventually, they scored a grainy copy of the video and watched it over and over again as they tried to mimic Jackson’s signature dance moves. Those were the innocent days of the mid-1980s, Sawalha said, before Hani became an alleged terrorist mastermind.
Al Jazeera obtained diaries of a Guantanamo Bay prisoner from Pakistan, sharing some great insight on the life of Hani before he was taken to Gitmo.
14:52 // 4 months ago
January 28, 2014
And with the Afghan war ending, this needs to be the year Congress lifts the remaining restrictions on detainee transfers and we close the prison at Guantanamo Bay – because we counter terrorism not just through intelligence and military action, but by remaining true to our Constitutional ideals, and setting an example for the rest of the world.
Obama, five years minutes ago.
22:10 // 6 months ago
November 18, 2013
11:50 // 8 months ago
May 5, 2013
0:34 // 1 year ago
April 13, 2013

Russia to U.S.: You ban our people for corruption? We’ll ban yours.

  • tit On Friday, the U.S. government announced that they would enforce visa bans on 18 Russian officials who were tied to the arrest and death of corruption lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, who died in prison after reportedly being denied medical coverage. The U.S., in making the announcement, claimed it was merely “complying with its legislative requirements.”
  • tat On Saturday, the Russian government did almost exactly the same thing to the U.S., placing visa bans 18 officials, some of whom were tied to the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, the Bush administration, or with harsh interrogation techniques, including Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, David Addington. source
14:07 // 1 year ago
January 31, 2013

Guantanamo judge: Dismantle secret censorship system

  • cause On Monday, a video feed from a military courtroom hearing a case involving 9/11 suspects stationed at Guantanamo was interrupted by an outside censor. While a person on the premises next to the judge censors sensitive information, the feed (which is already on a 40-second delay) was cut by a third party outside of the courtroom.
  • reaction On Thursday, the judge, Army Colonel James Pohl, ordered the censorship system dismantled. ”It is the judge that controls the courtroom,” he said. “This is the last time … any other third party will be permitted to unilaterally decide that the broadcast should be suspended.” Don’t mess with James Pohl. source
12:28 // 1 year ago
January 11, 2012
Guantanamo Bay has seen a decade as a detainee facility
A controversial anniversary: It was ten years ago to the day that the Guantanamo Bay naval base in Cuba was turned into a prison facility, designed to house suspected terrorist detainees indefinitely, pending a process of oft-criticized military tribunals. For the Obama administration, this was an occasion they once hoped (and indeed promised) would not happen; the President’s first full day in office was marked with the signing of an order to close the facility within a year. Three years on, and the failure to fulfill this promise (as well as the absence of any earnest public explanation of it) does beg the question: was this truly a moral issue for the President, or simply a made-to-order, feel-good issue to stoke a liberal base? Check the link for a very thoughtful piece on the anniversary of Gitmo from The Atlantic’s Andrew Cohen. (photo by Paul J. Richards, AFP/Getty Images) source
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A controversial anniversary: It was ten years ago to the day that the Guantanamo Bay naval base in Cuba was turned into a prison facility, designed to house suspected terrorist detainees indefinitely, pending a process of oft-criticized military tribunals. For the Obama administration, this was an occasion they once hoped (and indeed promised) would not happen; the President’s first full day in office was marked with the signing of an order to close the facility within a year. Three years on, and the failure to fulfill this promise (as well as the absence of any earnest public explanation of it) does beg the question: was this truly a moral issue for the President, or simply a made-to-order, feel-good issue to stoke a liberal base? Check the link for a very thoughtful piece on the anniversary of Gitmo from The Atlantic’s Andrew Cohen. (photo by Paul J. Richards, AFP/Getty Images) source

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14:10 // 2 years ago
May 12, 2011
washingtonpost:

» Bin Laden’s focus on U.S. led to rift» Trading one deluge for another? » Guantanamo inmates could get family visits» Hedge fund billionaire guilty in major insider-trading case» A student of history, Gingrich has his own to overcome

Today’s front page: Great to see the Washington Post doing this. It reminds us of an old friend of ours.
11:10 // 3 years ago
April 25, 2011
15:14 // 3 years ago
April 24, 2011
Wikileaks: Former Gitmo detainee now key Libyan rebel figure: Abu Sufian Ibrahim Ahmed Hamuda bin Qumu spent nearly a year in Guantanamo on the belief he had ties to al-Qaeda. Now he’s a leader amongst Libyan rebels. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Wikileaks: Former Gitmo detainee now key Libyan rebel figure: Abu Sufian Ibrahim Ahmed Hamuda bin Qumu spent nearly a year in Guantanamo on the belief he had ties to al-Qaeda. Now he’s a leader amongst Libyan rebels. source

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21:53 // 3 years ago