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July 22, 2013
13:27 // 1 year ago
July 21, 2013

"Justice for Trayvon" rallies sweep country

  • 100+ the number of ”Justice for Trayvon” rallies that took place nationwide on Saturday. Among the largest ones were the New York protest, which Trayvon Martin’s mother (and a few major celebrities) attended, and the Miami one, which his father did. ”This could be any one of our children,” Tracy Martin said. “Our mission now is to make sure that this doesn’t happen to your child.” source
10:30 // 1 year ago
July 19, 2013
This bill actually encourages people to shoot their way out of situations and that’s not how we live in a civilized society. It’s a mentality that has permeated the state of Florida. It’s a mentality of shoot first, and we should not have that in a civilized society.
Florida Senate Democratic leader Chris Smith • Discussing his party’s efforts to convene a special legislative session to modify or drop the state’s “Stand Your Ground” laws. While the effort may prove a challenge—both chambers in Florida are controlled by Republicans, Gov. Rick Scott has created a task force to investigate the law. Smith and his Florida House cohort Perry Thurston suggest a ballot initiative is likely if a revised law isn’t passed.
0:23 // 1 year ago
July 16, 2013
I decided today that until the Stand Your Ground law is abolished in Florida, I will never perform there again. As a matter of fact, wherever I find that law exists, I will not perform in that state or in that part of the world. As I said earlier, you can’t just talk about it, you have to be about it.

Stevie Wonder

image

I included the map to show just how much touring money he’s about to lose over this. It’s a pretty big sacrifice.

(via kingjaffejoffer)

So-called Stand Your Ground laws have garnered a lot of attention since the acquittal of George Zimmerman for the slaying of Sanford, FL teen Trayvon Martin, though as we mentioned earlier, the Zimmerman defense team never actually argued that provision of Florida law in their case. Subsequent comments by one of the six-person jury to CNN’s Anderson Cooper, however, suggest they may have included the controversial law in their deliberations in spite of that fact.

20:10 // 1 year ago
The Marissa Alexander story has been floating around online ever since the George Zimmerman verdict went down, but this piece, by the conservative media watchdog site Media Trackers, suggests that there’s more to the case than has been previously reported. The report, while disagreeing with the premise of the case being a “reverse Trayvon Martin situation,” is nonetheless a fair assessment of the situation, relying on the facts of the case as well as court documents to show the complexity of Alexander’s case. Eventually, it leans on this point:

If anything, Alexander’s case is an indictment of Florida’s mandatory minimum sentencing requirements, not its self-defense laws. State prosecutors initially offered Alexander a plea deal of three years in prison. She rejected the deal. Upon conviction, she was sentenced to a mandatory minimum of 20 years in prison. Under Florida law, often referred to as “10-20-Life” for its tiered minimum sentencing requirements, any person convicted of aggravated assault combined with the discharge of a deadly weapon “shall be sentenced to a minimum term of imprisonment of 20 years.”
In Alexander’s case, she might have received a lesser sentence under Florida law if she had killed Gray and been convicted of manslaughter rather than shooting at him and missing.

Among the things the story points out is that Alexander faced domestic violence charges after the incident occurred, that her husband Rico Gray admitted to lying to protect Alexander, and that Zimmerman never actually used the Stand Your Ground defense during his trial. “Alexander’s actions immediately before and after she discharged her firearm call into question her claim that she had no choice but to fire at Gray,” the story states. In the interest of showing all sides of this situation, we recommend you check this one out. (via David Putney)

The Marissa Alexander story has been floating around online ever since the George Zimmerman verdict went down, but this piece, by the conservative media watchdog site Media Trackers, suggests that there’s more to the case than has been previously reported. The report, while disagreeing with the premise of the case being a “reverse Trayvon Martin situation,” is nonetheless a fair assessment of the situation, relying on the facts of the case as well as court documents to show the complexity of Alexander’s case. Eventually, it leans on this point:

If anything, Alexander’s case is an indictment of Florida’s mandatory minimum sentencing requirements, not its self-defense laws. State prosecutors initially offered Alexander a plea deal of three years in prison. She rejected the deal. Upon conviction, she was sentenced to a mandatory minimum of 20 years in prison. Under Florida law, often referred to as “10-20-Life” for its tiered minimum sentencing requirements, any person convicted of aggravated assault combined with the discharge of a deadly weapon “shall be sentenced to a minimum term of imprisonment of 20 years.”

In Alexander’s case, she might have received a lesser sentence under Florida law if she had killed Gray and been convicted of manslaughter rather than shooting at him and missing.

Among the things the story points out is that Alexander faced domestic violence charges after the incident occurred, that her husband Rico Gray admitted to lying to protect Alexander, and that Zimmerman never actually used the Stand Your Ground defense during his trial. “Alexander’s actions immediately before and after she discharged her firearm call into question her claim that she had no choice but to fire at Gray,” the story states. In the interest of showing all sides of this situation, we recommend you check this one out(via David Putney)

19:34 // 1 year ago
18:04 // 1 year ago
16:18 // 1 year ago
July 15, 2013

swagandpassion says: Hey SFB. I'm not sure if this was asked already, but many people are counting down the clock until George Zimmerman will get a book deal and receive high profile interviews; basically the Casey Anthony treatment in a sense. How soon would a civil rights case have to be filed before he could profit from his 'circumstance'? How likely is a civil rights case to be successful.

» SFB says: I’m not a legal expert here, but from what I’ve read, it probably makes more sense of the Martin family to file a wrongful death suit against Zimmerman if their goal is to prevent him from taking advantage of the case for monetary gain. There are prior cases where this route was taken, most notably the Goldman family’s lawsuit against O.J. Simpson to prevent the release of the pseudo-confession “If I Did It,” which the Goldman family released as “Confessions of the Killer” after taking ownership of the book.

As for the chances a civil rights case of finding success, comments on the matter are mixed. The Christian Science Monitor has a good roundup of takes on the matter from legal experts who think the federal government may not see enough of a case to actually go forward, though others think otherwise. But it’s too soon for all that. The NAACP, which is advocating for a civil rights case, has Eric Holder’s ear. Holder is speaking at their annual conference tomorrow, in fact. I’m going with “inconclusive”, personally. — Ernie @ SFB

22:40 // 1 year ago
Cases are brought on the merits. The merits are evaluated by the professionals at the Department of Justice. That’s not something the president involves himself in.
Jay Carney • Responding to a reporter’s question,regarding the possibility that President Obama might be involved in the Department of Justice’s review of possible federal charges to be filed against George Zimmerman, during a morning briefing at the White House on Monday. President Obama has offered little in the way of opinion on the matter since Zimmerman’s verdict was revealed on Saturday, instead urging the country to remain calm in the wake of the jury’s decision. source
15:29 // 1 year ago
jenniferlawrencescheeks:

guardian:

Happy 75th anniversary Golden Gate Bridge!
Photograph: Doug Atkins/AP

This is being shared by thousands on Facebook as one of the protests of the Trayvon Martin verdict. It’s actually a photo that was taken in 1987—this Guardian link is from May 2012—during a celebration of the bridge’s 50th anniversary.
An estimated 300,000 people attended that celebration.
San Francisco seems like a cool place and all, but it’s beyond me how people can think this case could elicit this type of response.
I know people are feeling fucked up and searching for some hope, but please exercise some critical thinking here, people. Please.
As a black dude who has on many occasions been blatantly discriminated against by law enforcement and store employees and various racist shitheads, the not guilty verdict creeps me out. But the spread of ridiculous misinformation also creeps me out—and it’s counterproductive to overestimate how much people care.

This post of ours had a massive and unexpected surge of traffic last night, and it was largely as a result of people fact-checking a questionable image, which is the best possible way people should approach a questionable photo. We could add further comment on this, but this guy’s already said most of what we’ve wanted to say.

jenniferlawrencescheeks:

guardian:

Happy 75th anniversary Golden Gate Bridge!

Photograph: Doug Atkins/AP

This is being shared by thousands on Facebook as one of the protests of the Trayvon Martin verdict. It’s actually a photo that was taken in 1987—this Guardian link is from May 2012—during a celebration of the bridge’s 50th anniversary.

An estimated 300,000 people attended that celebration.

San Francisco seems like a cool place and all, but it’s beyond me how people can think this case could elicit this type of response.

I know people are feeling fucked up and searching for some hope, but please exercise some critical thinking here, people. Please.

As a black dude who has on many occasions been blatantly discriminated against by law enforcement and store employees and various racist shitheads, the not guilty verdict creeps me out. But the spread of ridiculous misinformation also creeps me out—and it’s counterproductive to overestimate how much people care.

This post of ours had a massive and unexpected surge of traffic last night, and it was largely as a result of people fact-checking a questionable image, which is the best possible way people should approach a questionable photo. We could add further comment on this, but this guy’s already said most of what we’ve wanted to say.

(Source: , via mike-writes)

10:29 // 1 year ago