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August 23, 2011
Breaking: Russian official says he’s spoken to Gaddafi, says he’s still in Tripoli, doesn’t plan to leave.

Breaking: Russian official says he’s spoken to Gaddafi, says he’s still in Tripoli, doesn’t plan to leave.

10:45 // 2 years ago
The tensions are far from being over. The situation is dynamic and complex.
NATO Col. Roland Lavoie • Emphasizing that the situation in Tripoli is far from over. You know, just in case you had any questions about it. A key sign of this was the reappearance of Saif al-Islam, a symbolic flash point that suggested to many that this wasn’t going to be an overnight change. Regarding the explanation on his sudden reappearance, rebel spokesperson Dia Alhutmany explained off earlier reports that he helped circulate about al-Islam’s reappearance: ”Anyway, whether he is arrested or still free, the regime is no longer (ruling) the country, and very soon he and his father will be captured.” Either way, the fighting is still on. Much more to do. source (viafollow)
10:24 // 2 years ago
August 22, 2011
We also commend our British, French, and other allies, as well as our Arab partners, especially Qatar and the UAE, for their leadership in this conflict. Americans can be proud of the role our country has played in helping to defeat Qaddafi, but we regret that this success was so long in coming due to the failure of the United States to employ the full weight of our airpower.
A statement by Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham from last night • Congratulating everyone except the United States for the Tripoli uprising. Jerks.
20:36 // 2 years ago
More on Saif al-Islam: Today in tweets which will piss off many people following Libya, CNN’s Matthew Chance reports that Gaddafi’s son is still alive and has been in Tripoli hanging out the whole time. *grumble*

More on Saif al-Islam: Today in tweets which will piss off many people following Libya, CNN’s Matthew Chance reports that Gaddafi’s son is still alive and has been in Tripoli hanging out the whole time. *grumble*

20:20 // 2 years ago
kateoplis:

Saif Al Islam Gaddafi is seen in Tripoli tonight and claims his detention was a trick by the rebels. “I am here to refute all the allegations. NATO & the West have advanced technology, they sent Libyans messages I don’t know how…”
Unbelievable.

Holy hell.

kateoplis:

Saif Al Islam Gaddafi is seen in Tripoli tonight and claims his detention was a trick by the rebels. “I am here to refute all the allegations. NATO & the West have advanced technology, they sent Libyans messages I don’t know how…”

Unbelievable.

Holy hell.

20:05 // 2 years ago
Delayed reaction of the day: Silvio Berlusconi’s plea to the Libyan rebels
Now, you might not know this, but there’s a bit of a civil war going on at the moment in Libya. The rebels are fairly close to victory — so close they can smell it. So, right on cue, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, a former colonial leader of Libya who was once an ally to Gaddafi and a reluctant partner in the NATO campaign in Libya, has urged the rebels “to abstain from any violence.” Now … look. We can see that there is obvious danger of things escalating, and the rebels do need to be careful to approach the situation carefully. But seriously, this is the wrong time for this comment if he’s going to make it. This is, like, a war, man. Things like this happen. But to tell the rebels to drop their weapons now, at a key time in the country’s history where they’re about to win, seems just a little bit tone-deaf to the current situation. source
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Now, you might not know this, but there’s a bit of a civil war going on at the moment in Libya. The rebels are fairly close to victory — so close they can smell it. So, right on cue, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, a former colonial leader of Libya who was once an ally to Gaddafi and a reluctant partner in the NATO campaign in Libya, has urged the rebels “to abstain from any violence.” Now … look. We can see that there is obvious danger of things escalating, and the rebels do need to be careful to approach the situation carefully. But seriously, this is the wrong time for this comment if he’s going to make it. This is, like, a war, man. Things like this happen. But to tell the rebels to drop their weapons now, at a key time in the country’s history where they’re about to win, seems just a little bit tone-deaf to the current situation. source

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10:47 // 2 years ago
More than any of the region’s autocratic leaders, perhaps, Gaddafi was a man of contrasts. He was a sponsor of terrorism who condemned the Sept. 11 attacks. He was a brutal dictator who bulldozed a jail wall to free political prisoners. He was an Arab nationalist who derided the Arab League. And in the crowning paradox, he preached people power, only to have his people take to the streets and take up arms in rebellion.
The Associated Press • In a lengthy piece glancing over the long rule of Muammar Gaddafi. It’s a good read that goes a long way to explain the often-confusing nature behind a man who gave North Africa fits for decades, and even occasionally showed up in the West to offer up a little bit of fresh weirdness. No place was that more obvious than when he went to the United Nations to speak in 2009. It was a weird, rambling speech that left more that a few world officials bewildered. In some ways, though, it proved the leader’s last big gasp. Less than two years later, it appears that his regime has been all but taken away. source (viafollow)
10:20 // 2 years ago
August 21, 2011
life:

In 1969, 27-year-old Capt. Muammar Gaddafi overthrew the king of Libya in a bloodless coup, promoted himself to Colonel, and declared the country a socialist state. Ever since, he’s remained one of the world’s most controversial leaders, and a man of profound contradictions. He describes Libya as a popular democracy, but his word is law. He has sponsored terrorists and violent revolutionaries, but has frequently acknowledged his actions while avidly courting Western approval.
see more — Gaddafi: The Last Supervillain?

Vintage Gaddafi, from when he looked slightly less crazy.

life:

In 1969, 27-year-old Capt. Muammar Gaddafi overthrew the king of Libya in a bloodless coup, promoted himself to Colonel, and declared the country a socialist state. Ever since, he’s remained one of the world’s most controversial leaders, and a man of profound contradictions. He describes Libya as a popular democracy, but his word is law. He has sponsored terrorists and violent revolutionaries, but has frequently acknowledged his actions while avidly courting Western approval.

see moreGaddafi: The Last Supervillain?

Vintage Gaddafi, from when he looked slightly less crazy.

22:48 // 2 years ago
22:32 // 2 years ago
thepoliticalnotebook:

CORRECTION: They were talking about the OTHER Gaddhafi.

Nearly posted that but just stopped myself. Damn.

thepoliticalnotebook:

CORRECTION: They were talking about the OTHER Gaddhafi.

Nearly posted that but just stopped myself. Damn.

(Source: waitingonoblivion, via thepoliticalnotebook)

19:07 // 3 years ago