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June 20, 2013
20:47 // 9 months ago
January 28, 2013
wired:

A Virginia man who wrote an abbreviated version of the Fourth Amendment on his body and stripped to his shorts at an airport security screening area won a trial Friday in his lawsuit seeking $250,000 in damages for being detained on a disorderly conduct charge.
[via Threat Level]
…hooray for America?

More impressive than the victory? The man’s chest-writing skills.

wired:

A Virginia man who wrote an abbreviated version of the Fourth Amendment on his body and stripped to his shorts at an airport security screening area won a trial Friday in his lawsuit seeking $250,000 in damages for being detained on a disorderly conduct charge.

[via Threat Level]


…hooray for America?

More impressive than the victory? The man’s chest-writing skills.

(Source: Wired, via laughterkey)

9:26 // 1 year ago
January 23, 2012
Just decided: The Supreme Court decided in favor of nightclub owner Antoine Jones, convicted of drug conspiracy based partly on GPS evidence, saying that the federal government needs a warrant when using a GPS device to track someone. Here’s the decision. A key line from Antonin Scalia’s main opinion here: “It is important to be clear about what occurred in this case: The Government physically occupied private property for the purpose of obtaining information. We have no doubt that such a physical intrusion would have been considered a ‘search’ within the meaning of the Fourth Amendment when it was adopted.”

Just decided: The Supreme Court decided in favor of nightclub owner Antoine Jones, convicted of drug conspiracy based partly on GPS evidence, saying that the federal government needs a warrant when using a GPS device to track someone. Here’s the decision. A key line from Antonin Scalia’s main opinion here: “It is important to be clear about what occurred in this case: The Government physically occupied private property for the purpose of obtaining information. We have no doubt that such a physical intrusion would have been considered a ‘search’ within the meaning of the Fourth Amendment when it was adopted.”

10:54 // 2 years ago