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March 1, 2013
10:19 // 1 year ago
November 13, 2012
picturedept:

Dronestagram: The Drone’s Eye View
via futurejournalismproject:

At the FJP, we’re always fascinated by projects that colonize the new booming platforms and go totally native; adapting the story to survive in a new environment. 
Dronestagram posts a satellite view to Instagram showing the location of drone strikes before the attack. By focusing on getting the drone story working well on Instagram, the story automatically gets to mobiles, Facebook, twitter and tumblr easily and elegantly.
The inventor and publisher, James Bridle, writes he’s “making these locations just a little bit more visible, a little closer. A little more real.”
James Bridle’s CV extends way beyond journalism; as well as his column for the UK-based Observer newspaper, he’s presented at TED and SXSW, and his Iraq War Historiography, a twelve volume encyclopedia of changes to politically contentious wikipedia pages about the second gulf war, has been exhibited in galleries in the US, Europe and Asia.
The Bureau of Investigative Journalism provides Bridle with details of the strikes across Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia. He then researches across “original media reports, wikipedia, local government and media sites” to get the best location and satellite view.
This isn’t the first time creative technologists have tried to tell the drone story in creative ways on digital platforms; back in August we posted about Apple rejecting an iPhone application that showed an alert each time a drone strike was reported. But this one has actually reached the public, and is already growing its audience.
There’s more on the project The Verge, and you can follow Dronestagram on twitter, tumblr or Instagram, of course.


A brilliant idea which could give an oft-underreported story angle more attention.

picturedept:

Dronestagram: The Drone’s Eye View

via futurejournalismproject:

At the FJP, we’re always fascinated by projects that colonize the new booming platforms and go totally native; adapting the story to survive in a new environment. 

Dronestagram posts a satellite view to Instagram showing the location of drone strikes before the attack. By focusing on getting the drone story working well on Instagram, the story automatically gets to mobiles, Facebook, twitter and tumblr easily and elegantly.

The inventor and publisher, James Bridle, writes he’s “making these locations just a little bit more visible, a little closer. A little more real.”

James Bridle’s CV extends way beyond journalism; as well as his column for the UK-based Observer newspaper, he’s presented at TED and SXSW, and his Iraq War Historiography, a twelve volume encyclopedia of changes to politically contentious wikipedia pages about the second gulf war, has been exhibited in galleries in the US, Europe and Asia.

The Bureau of Investigative Journalism provides Bridle with details of the strikes across Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia. He then researches across “original media reports, wikipedia, local government and media sites” to get the best location and satellite view.

This isn’t the first time creative technologists have tried to tell the drone story in creative ways on digital platforms; back in August we posted about Apple rejecting an iPhone application that showed an alert each time a drone strike was reported. But this one has actually reached the public, and is already growing its audience.

There’s more on the project The Verge, and you can follow Dronestagram on twitter, tumblr or Instagram, of course.

A brilliant idea which could give an oft-underreported story angle more attention.

12:35 // 1 year ago
May 16, 2012
picturedept:

Hello World
PICTURE DEPT is a new venue for photography presented by the award-winning Newsweek & The Daily Beast photo teams. As photo sharing has exploded online with services like Instagram, Tumblr, Facebook, and others, there has never been more content available for viewing. But as more great, new photography venues are created, it is increasingly hard to keep up with the seemingly endless stream—and to find the very best of what’s out there. PICTURE DEPT is designed to both filter and condense this information into a single resource. The site includes curated photo features and recommendations of the best of what is happening in photography—not just from Newsweek & The Daily Beast but also from Tumblr, around the Web, and the world beyond the computer screen.
About the name:
When we decided to create a photo Tumblr, we turned to the amazing Newsweek archives for inspiration, and there we discovered a battered metal box that contained hundreds of faded yellow 4 x 6 note cards. On each card was the date of an issue of the magazine and the complete listing of its photo spreads. And they were all titled “PICTURE DEPT”, the original moniker of the photo department. The cards ranged in date from the 1930’s - 1970’s and reminded us of the amazing legacy of the magazine. So we decided to resurrect Picture Dept for the 21st century. 
Follow us!

Be sure to check the design of the site, which is pretty solid. A note from Newsweek’s social media editor Brian Ries on the concept: “The plan: original photography, photos that run in the magazine and on the site, photos that don’t make it, and the best photos they find around the web and on tumblr. It will also be a great source for learning about local photography exhibitions and/or books to pick up.” Worth a look, all.

picturedept:

Hello World

PICTURE DEPT is a new venue for photography presented by the award-winning Newsweek & The Daily Beast photo teams. As photo sharing has exploded online with services like Instagram, Tumblr, Facebook, and others, there has never been more content available for viewing. But as more great, new photography venues are created, it is increasingly hard to keep up with the seemingly endless stream—and to find the very best of what’s out there. PICTURE DEPT is designed to both filter and condense this information into a single resource. The site includes curated photo features and recommendations of the best of what is happening in photography—not just from Newsweek & The Daily Beast but also from Tumblr, around the Web, and the world beyond the computer screen.

About the name:

When we decided to create a photo Tumblr, we turned to the amazing Newsweek archives for inspiration, and there we discovered a battered metal box that contained hundreds of faded yellow 4 x 6 note cards. On each card was the date of an issue of the magazine and the complete listing of its photo spreads. And they were all titled “PICTURE DEPT”, the original moniker of the photo department. The cards ranged in date from the 1930’s - 1970’s and reminded us of the amazing legacy of the magazine. So we decided to resurrect Picture Dept for the 21st century. 

Follow us!

Be sure to check the design of the site, which is pretty solid. A note from Newsweek’s social media editor Brian Ries on the concept: “The plan: original photography, photos that run in the magazine and on the site, photos that don’t make it, and the best photos they find around the web and on tumblr. It will also be a great source for learning about local photography exhibitions and/or books to pick up.” Worth a look, all.

16:02 // 1 year ago