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May 17, 2013

To the people complaining that “Yahoo will ruin Tumblr like it ruined Flickr”

seldo:

I am super bored of hearing this.

Could Yahoo have done a better job of managing Flickr? Absolutely.

In retrospect, if they’d been patient and poured money into it like Facebook did with their own photo-sharing features, Flickr might have been a lot bigger. (Facebook is by far the world’s biggest photo-sharing site, and tagged photos was key to its early growth, something Flickr didn’t add until 2007)

But that’s in retrospect. In 2005, it wasn’t at all clear what to do. Everyone in the industry was still feeling the burn of gigantic, unprofitable acquisitions prior to the great crash of 2001, so paying money for an barely-profitable site like Flickr still seemed like madness, even within Yahoo. So Yahoo focussed on making it profitable — and succeeded, which is no mean feat.

Could Flickr have done better staying independent? Absolutely no way.

And the way you can tell that for sure is that they let Yahoo acquire them. It’s not like Yahoo in 2005 had a great reputation; the only reason you’d do it is if you were out of money and out of options. In 2005, nobody was going to give Flickr the hundreds of millions of dollars in fresh capital they needed and hope for the best: it was exit or die.

On top of the bare financial reality, it is an open secret at Yahoo (my former employer) that Flickr’s internals are and have always been an architectural nightmare. They had no idea how to scale and needed huge investment just to dig themselves out of the technical debt they’d accrued. It could have been better, sure, but without Yahoo it would have been much, much worse.

Yahoo didn’t kill Flickr; Yahoo saved Flickr from itself.

Here’s a lesser-heard take on the Yahoo/Tumblr thing from Laurie Voss, who is a former Yahoo employee and has some good insight on the matter as a result.

22:55 // 11 months ago
January 23, 2013
19:05 // 1 year ago
December 23, 2012
23:45 // 1 year ago
December 17, 2012
10:36 // 1 year ago
August 22, 2012
parislemon:

Speaking of Flickr, time for an update on the the Popular Cameraphones chart:
1) iPhone 4S
2) iPhone 4
3) iPhone 3GS
4) iPhone 3G
5) Samsung Galaxy S II
The good news: Android is finally on the verge of overtaking an iOS device on the chart.
The bad news: this iOS device is four years old. It’s so old, in fact, that the iPhone 3G was taken off the market by Apple a year ago. Yet there still isn’t a single Android device that can pass it on this chart. Pretty pathetic. 
The other bad news: the iPhone 4S and iPhone 4 are so far ahead of the rest of the cameraphone pack that it seems highly unlikely that any Android device will come close anytime soon. In fact, they’re the number one and number two cameras used to take Flickr photos, period. Not smartphone cameras — cameras, cameras.
The really bad news: the new iPhone is a month away.

But on the other hand, we’re talking about the Android community, where there are so many varieties of phones out there that it’s possible that if you combined them all together, it might be a different picture. The reason why the iPhone and iPhone 4S models rank so high on this chart is because of lack of splintering … right?

parislemon:

Speaking of Flickr, time for an update on the the Popular Cameraphones chart:

1) iPhone 4S

2) iPhone 4

3) iPhone 3GS

4) iPhone 3G

5) Samsung Galaxy S II

The good news: Android is finally on the verge of overtaking an iOS device on the chart.

The bad news: this iOS device is four years old. It’s so old, in fact, that the iPhone 3G was taken off the market by Apple a year ago. Yet there still isn’t a single Android device that can pass it on this chart. Pretty pathetic. 

The other bad news: the iPhone 4S and iPhone 4 are so far ahead of the rest of the cameraphone pack that it seems highly unlikely that any Android device will come close anytime soon. In fact, they’re the number one and number two cameras used to take Flickr photos, period. Not smartphone cameras — cameras, cameras.

The really bad news: the new iPhone is a month away.

But on the other hand, we’re talking about the Android community, where there are so many varieties of phones out there that it’s possible that if you combined them all together, it might be a different picture. The reason why the iPhone and iPhone 4S models rank so high on this chart is because of lack of splintering … right?

9:21 // 1 year ago
July 17, 2012
Speaking of Marissa Mayer, seems like people are already pinning their hopes and dreams on the new Yahoo CEO.

Speaking of Marissa Mayer, seems like people are already pinning their hopes and dreams on the new Yahoo CEO.

11:05 // 1 year ago
April 2, 2012

Gage Skidmore: How one teenager gives the GOP its Flickr close-up

You don’t know him, but you’ve seen his work: The rise of Creative Commons has leveled the playing field for bloggers, giving many the opportunity to illustrate stories with free-to-use images that are at times comparable to wire photos. But the quality varies, and it’s rare to find someone sharing high-quality pictures consistently — but Gage Skidmore pulls it off. The 18-year-old photographer, who shoots celebrities and conservative politicians largely as a hobby, has uploaded nearly 9,000 photos to Flickr since early 2008, and thanks to favorable licensing, finds his photos of famous and important people in use all over the Web — including such sites as MSNBC, Fox NewsThe Atlantic and Mashable. What drives his work? Click on to see his take on the matter.

Read More

12:31 // 2 years ago
September 18, 2011
18:46 // 2 years ago
May 17, 2011
Flickr got a front-page redesign: It’s a bit of a change from simplistic-yet-photo-heavy approach, but it’s not awful by any stretch (and it appears to be mostly to introduce new users to the service, as the current design is basically the same once you’ve logged in). What do you guys think about Yahoo’s photo-focused jewel?

Flickr got a front-page redesign: It’s a bit of a change from simplistic-yet-photo-heavy approach, but it’s not awful by any stretch (and it appears to be mostly to introduce new users to the service, as the current design is basically the same once you’ve logged in). What do you guys think about Yahoo’s photo-focused jewel?

23:50 // 2 years ago