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December 27, 2013
Electoral college reform: If you redrew U.S. state lines so that every one had the same population, this is what the country would look like. In addition to being an awesome visualization, this map proposes some truly great names for the new territories. How cool would it be to say “I’m moving to Big Thicket,” or “let’s take a trip to Shiprock this summer?” Neil Freeman, the creator of the map, argues that this plan would not only eliminate the well-documented issues with the electoral college, but also create House districts that are perfectly equal in size. It sure sounds a lot more reasonable than the GOP’s proposals for electoral college reform. source

Electoral college reform: If you redrew U.S. state lines so that every one had the same population, this is what the country would look like. In addition to being an awesome visualization, this map proposes some truly great names for the new territories. How cool would it be to say “I’m moving to Big Thicket,” or “let’s take a trip to Shiprock this summer?” Neil Freeman, the creator of the map, argues that this plan would not only eliminate the well-documented issues with the electoral college, but also create House districts that are perfectly equal in size. It sure sounds a lot more reasonable than the GOP’s proposals for electoral college reformsource

14:39 // 8 months ago
January 26, 2013
9:02 // 1 year ago
November 12, 2012
If Republicans do not do better in the Hispanic community, in a few short years Republicans will no longer be the majority party in our state. If that happens, no Republican will ever again win the White House. New York and California are for the foreseeable future unalterably Democrat. If Texas turns bright blue, the Electoral College math is simple. We won’t be talking about Ohio, we won’t be talking about Florida or Virginia, because it won’t matter. If Texas is bright blue, you can’t get to two-seventy electoral votes. The Republican Party would cease to exist. We would become like the Whig Party.
Republican Senator-Elect Ted Cruz • Discussing the GOP’s need for better outreach in Hispanic and Latino communities around the country, but particularly in his home state of Texas. The Lone Star State, and its 38 electoral college votes, remain central to the Republican Party’s presidential election strategy, and its loss could prove insurmountable for the GOP. While no one is suggesting such a flip will happen by 2016 (or even 2020), Cruz’s concerns follow similar comments made by one of former presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s own advisers last week. source
15:38 // 1 year ago
November 5, 2012
election:

How a genius election-related graphic came together
The other night, I posted this really amazing New York Times graphic breaking down the numerous roads to Electoral College victory Obama and Romney can take. Think the graphic was cool? Now here’s how they did it. In the words of the Times’ very own Mike Bostock:

The hard part of this graphic, implementation-wise, is the animated transition as you flip states. Although this is superficially similar to collapsible interactive trees I had implemented previously, it turned out to be more challenging due to the pruning below decision nodes. To assist my thinking, I sketched out a sample tree with eight different interactions and the corresponding animations. With examples, it was possible to generalize the behavior of the transitions and start the implementation.

Which road do you think the Electoral College is going to take?
— Ernie @ ShortFormBlog

Infographic creators aspire to create something this awesome. And here it is.

election:

How a genius election-related graphic came together

The other night, I posted this really amazing New York Times graphic breaking down the numerous roads to Electoral College victory Obama and Romney can take. Think the graphic was cool? Now here’s how they did it. In the words of the Times’ very own Mike Bostock:

The hard part of this graphic, implementation-wise, is the animated transition as you flip states. Although this is superficially similar to collapsible interactive trees I had implemented previously, it turned out to be more challenging due to the pruning below decision nodes. To assist my thinking, I sketched out a sample tree with eight different interactions and the corresponding animations. With examples, it was possible to generalize the behavior of the transitions and start the implementation.

Which road do you think the Electoral College is going to take?

— Ernie @ ShortFormBlog

Infographic creators aspire to create something this awesome. And here it is.

(via gov)

19:20 // 1 year ago
October 18, 2012
14:31 // 1 year ago
September 30, 2012
11:34 // 1 year ago