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July 5, 2013

Death toll rises in wake of Egyptian coup

30 killed in Egypt today as protests over President Morsi’s ouster flare up around the country. Muslim Brotherhood supporters are calling today the “Friday of Rage,” and over 10,000 have taken to the streets to protest the President’s removal two days ago by the military. The National Salvation front, which supported Morsi’s overthrow, has called for counter-protests this Sunday. source

20:34 // 9 months ago
July 1, 2013

fotojournalismus:

Egypt June 30, 2013

1. A protester waves a national flag as Egyptians gather in Tahrir Square during a demonstration against President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo on June 30, 2013. (Amr Nabil/AP)

2. An anti-Mursi protester chants slogans during a massive protest in Alexandria on June 30, 2013. (Asmaa Waguih/Reuters)

3. A protester waves a national flag from the top of a light pole during a demonstration in Tahrir Square in Cairo on June 30, 2013. (Manu Brabo/AP)

4. Protesters gather during a demonstration at Tahrir Square in Cairo on June 30, 2013. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)

5. A picture taken on June 30, 2013 shows laser lights directed by Egyptian protestors on a military helicopter flying over the presidential palace in Cairo, as hundreds of thousands of Egyptian demonstrators gather during a protest calling for the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi. (Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images)

6. Opponents of  Morsi protest, some with green lasers, outside the presidential palace, in Cairo on June 30, 2013. (Hassan Ammar/AP)

7. Opponents of Morsi wave national flags and chant slogans during a protest outside the presidential palace, in Cairo on June 30, 2013. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

8. Protesters lit a flare during a protest at Tahrir Square in Cairo on June 30, 2013. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)

9. An Egyptian protester attacks the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters in the Mokattam district in Cairo on June 30, 2013. (Manu Brabo/AP)

10. Protesters gather during a demonstration at Tahrir Square in Cairo on June 30, 2013. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)

(via humanrightswatch)

11:41 // 9 months ago
July 13, 2011

How are the protests against the Egyptian military paying off?

  • 669Egyptian police officers linked to Mubarak regime fired source

» Showing off at cleaning house: Going thousands strong, it’s easy enough to see that the Egypt’s ruling military council would want a means of positive P.R. to quell a protest movement (as well as less activist sections of the public) that’s clamoring for purges of Mubarak-connected officials. What effect this decision will actually have in the day-to-day matters of policing within Egypt is too hard to say right now, but that the military is taking any sort of giving posture speaks to the strength and legitimacy of continuing protests in Tahrir Square.

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17:41 // 2 years ago
March 21, 2011

More on Egypt’s recently-passed constitutional referendum

Oh yeah, that: With all the chaos in Libya and Japan, there hasn’t been much attention paid to what’s happened in Egypt in the wake of President Hosni Mubarak’s ousting. So, here’s the skinny: Over the weekend, the country voted on a referendum containing substantial changes to the country’s Constitution. Both of the country’s two major political parties, the National Democratic Party and the Muslim Brotherhood, supported the changes, which passed with 77% of the vote. Now, it has to pass a parliamentary vote, which could come as early as September. But what was actually in it, and how is it playing out in Egypt?

  • Limits on the Presidency In addition to reducing the length of presidential terms from six years to four, the new Constitution, if adopted, will instate a two-term limit for future presidents (Mubarak led for thirty years). Also, it requires the President to select a deputy within thirty days of assuming office, and bars anybody under 40 from running for President.
  • High Voter TurnoutBack in the Mubarak days, many Egyptians thought leaders rigged the elections, so there wasn’t much of an impetus to vote. This time, 41% — or 18 million people — came out to vote. Not staggeringly high, for sure, but nothing to sneeze at, either. If anything, this turnout bodes well for the prospects of a democratic Egypt.
  • Mixed Reactions Some pro-democracy groups are upset that the reforms didn’t go far enough. Activists claim the changes will benefit the two major parties, and some want to tear up the constitution and start over. Perhaps. Even so, the referendum’s passage seems — tentatively — like a good step towards rebuilding the country. source

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23:50 // 3 years ago
February 1, 2011
Maintaining the stability that has lasted in Egypt for the past 30 years is a goal of highest importance for Israel on the regional level. The Egyptian army, which is faithful to Mubarak, is an anchor and thus the army’s leaders bear the responsibility for continued stability.
Israeli Knesset minister Shaul Mofaz • Relating the Israeli perspective on the turmoil taking place in Egypt. Mofaz is the Chairman of the Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee, and had a lot to say. In his eyes, it’s best for Israel if Mubarek survives the protests and holds elections in September, which is possible as “the protesters lack an organized leadership.” He also spoke to Iran’s perspective on the conflict, saying that Iranian leaders are “watching the events in Egypt with enjoyment,” in hopes that the Muslim Brotherhood takes over. High stakes be damned, Mofaz ultimately stated that Israel should not get involved. source (viafollow)
0:27 // 3 years ago
January 31, 2011

Egyptian troops to protesters: Don’t worry, we won’t hurt ya

  • now The Egyptian military, which enjoys a positive relationship with the Egyptian people, has stated that it will not use force against the protesters.
  • future What if President Mubarek orders them to fire regardless? Will they defy him? If so, that could be a critical blow to his efforts to retain the presidency. source
22:31 // 3 years ago
In a 22-kilometer (14-mile) route from our suburb to the airport we had to get through 19 checkpoints, including nine manned by civilians.
Markos Loukogiannakis, a Greek traveler • On trying to get to the Cairo airport in the midst of the protests. And this is before he even steps foot inside the airport! source (viafollow)
22:12 // 3 years ago
January 30, 2011

Hillary Clinton toughens her words on Egyptian situation

  • yeah … U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is calling for Egypt to have an “orderly, peaceful transition” to a “real democracy,” which is much further than the Obama administration has gone so far during the crisis. Hopefully, they’ll go much further.
  • … but Clinton later dodged the military aid question: “We always are looking and reviewing our aid but right now we are trying to convey a message that is very clear, that we want to ensure there is no violence and no provocation that result in violence.” source
11:06 // 3 years ago
January 28, 2011
Great idea. When you’re the problem, fire everyone around you.

Great idea. When you’re the problem, fire everyone around you.

17:38 // 3 years ago
Egypt’s situation completely screwed up beyond disrepair today
To be clear, a lot is happening in Egypt right now. It’s a giant mess, really. Nobel Peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei is reportedly under house arrest, media outlets are getting attacked, security forces are attacking protesters, the internet’s OFF … pretty much every bad thing that could happen in a revolution is happening today. It’s very much a “where-do-we-start”-type of situation. There is no central point. It’s a lot of bad, everywhere. We’ll try our best to keep an eye on all this today. (tweet via @alaa, a South African who has been covering Egypt heavily) source
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To be clear, a lot is happening in Egypt right now. It’s a giant mess, really. Nobel Peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei is reportedly under house arrest, media outlets are getting attacked, security forces are attacking protesters, the internet’s OFF … pretty much every bad thing that could happen in a revolution is happening today. It’s very much a “where-do-we-start”-type of situation. There is no central point. It’s a lot of bad, everywhere. We’ll try our best to keep an eye on all this today. (tweet via @alaa, a South African who has been covering Egypt heavily) source

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11:13 // 3 years ago