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June 24, 2012
Egyptian election results bring cheers of joy, waves of worry
Egypt reacts to elections: Supporters of Mohammed Morsi celebrated in Tahrir Square as election results were read over loudspeakers. “We’re finally going to be respected, we’ve been oppressed for too long,” said, Adham Lotfy, a 28-year-old owner of a parking garage. However, not everyone is as ecstatic as members of the Muslim Brotherhood. ”I’m very sceptical, and I fear what is still to be done,” said an anonymous woman to Al Jazeera reporter, Evan Hill. source
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Egypt reacts to elections: Supporters of Mohammed Morsi celebrated in Tahrir Square as election results were read over loudspeakers. “We’re finally going to be respected, we’ve been oppressed for too long,” said, Adham Lotfy, a 28-year-old owner of a parking garage. However, not everyone is as ecstatic as members of the Muslim Brotherhood. ”I’m very sceptical, and I fear what is still to be done,” said an anonymous woman to Al Jazeera reporter, Evan Hill. source

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20:40 // 1 year ago
President Morsi will struggle to control the levers of state. He will likely face foot-dragging and perhaps outright attempts to undermine his initiatives from key institutions. Faced with such resistance, frustration may tempt him fall into the trap of attempting to throw his new weight around. This would be a mistake. His challenge is to lead a bitterly divided, fearful, and angry population toward a peaceful democratic outcome, without becoming a reviled scapegoat for continued military rule.
European Council on Foreign Relations Senior Policy Fellow Elijah Zarwan • Analyzing the challenges Mohamed Morsi will face in leading Egypt in the coming months and years. Morsi won the election on Sunday, with 52 percent of the vote.
10:50 // 1 year ago
zainyk:

Mohammed Morsi - President Of Egypt.
He received his Ph.D. in Engineering from the University of Southern California in 1982. He was an Assistant Professor at California State University, Northridge from 1982 to 1985. In 1985, he returned to Egypt to teach at Zagazig University. His children were born in California and are U.S. citizens.

zainyk:

Mohammed Morsi - President Of Egypt.

He received his Ph.D. in Engineering from the University of Southern California in 1982. He was an Assistant Professor at California State University, Northridge from 1982 to 1985. In 1985, he returned to Egypt to teach at Zagazig University. His children were born in California and are U.S. citizens.

10:43 // 1 year ago
newsflick:

Breaking News: Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood wins the Egyptian presidential elections. Via aljazeera

After a long wait … Morsi wins. The Muslim Brotherhood leader received 13.2 million votes, Al Jazeera English reports.

newsflick:

Breaking News: Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood wins the Egyptian presidential elections. Via aljazeera

After a long wait … Morsi wins. The Muslim Brotherhood leader received 13.2 million votes, Al Jazeera English reports.

(via newsflick)

10:37 // 1 year ago
December 1, 2011

Clarification on the Egypt elections post

rcabbasi said: As has already been pointed out, calling a single political party “the Salafis” is misleading and inaccurate.

» SFB says: The NYT article that the quote was culled from is written in a way that implies this, referring to supporters of the party as “the Salafis” down to the quotes used (example: the quote we pulled out). We reworded our part to reflect that it’s not in fact a single political party for a much larger group. Apologies for the confusion. — Ernie @ SFB

23:49 // 2 years ago
The Salafis have been underestimated from day one, because it is hard to imagine how this guy with a long beard and some aggressive ideas can actually gain much support.
Shadi Hamid, a researcher at the Brookings Institution in Doha, Qatar • Discussing the elections in Egypt. So far, the Muslim Brotherhood’s party has received 40 percent of the Egyptian Parliament’s votes. Meanwhile, the Al Nour party, formed by ultra-conservative Salafis, has secured 25 percent. The Islamist party began re-entering politics after Mubarak was ousted, and rallied around millions of Egyptians who were already organized politically. That’s at least double the members of the Muslim Brotherhood. While they may not have pulled ahead in this election, the Salafi sect has become a prominent political force nonetheless. (EDIT: Modified wording based on reader suggestion.) source (viafollow)
23:13 // 2 years ago
March 1, 2011

Quickly: How democracy will work in post-Mubarak Egypt

  • 03/19The Egyptian military will vote on a motion to rewrite the country’s constitution.
  • June The country plans to hold fresh parliamentary elections (which is a pretty fast timetable).
  • then … Six weeks later, Egyptians should plan to vote for the country’s new president. source
10:14 // 3 years ago