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September 20, 2011
This is why I chose to come out on Day 1 after the policy changed. I chose to come out publicly for the thousands of gay military members who have been told they are a risk if they serve in the military openly and honestly. People may say what I’m doing is attention-seeking or not befitting a military officer, but that very mentality shows the prejudice we still harbor when it comes to sexual orientation.
Air Force First Lieutenant Josh Seefried • Discussing his choice to come out on the very first day of the official repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell.” Seefried had planned for this moment. See, Seefried launched OutServe, an organization for gay service members, while working under the pseudonym “JD Smith.” So it only makes sense that he’d be one of the very first people to come out under the new policy — and in a bold way, as a guest columnist for The Daily Beast. More power to him. source (viafollow)
10:29 // 2 years ago
December 18, 2010

DREAM Act falters, DADT repeal gets past debate in Senate

  • 55-41 the Senate wasn’t really into the DREAM Act
  • 63-33 however, they can back a DADT repeal (WHOO) source
11:53 // 3 years ago
December 10, 2010
My greatest worry will be that we are at the mercy of the courts and all of the lack of predictability that that entails.
Defense Secretary Robert Gates • Emphasizing that it’s better for Congress to repeal “don’t ask, don’t tell” and allow an orderly end to the policy than for the court system to simply force an end to the policy. Yesterday’s vote which failed 57-40, fell apart without any GOP support; Gates was “disappointed in the Senate vote, but not surprised.” Along with just about everyone else looking for a repeal, buddy. source (viafollow)
15:26 // 3 years ago
December 2, 2010
I am not saying this law should never change. I am simply saying that it may be premature to make such a change at this time and in this manner, without further consideration of this report and further study of the issue by Congress.
Sen. John McCain • Speaking during a Senate hearing today about “don’t ask, don’t tell.” McCain claims that repealing the law now would be “premature,” and points to numbers about Army and Marine combat units not being quite ready for the change. This is despite the fact that the military’s highest-ups have all made the case that the policy should change as soon as possible. Hm. source (viafollow)
10:54 // 3 years ago
November 5, 2010

Preliminary “Don’t Ask” ruling winds its way to Supreme Court

  • federal A federal judge in California ruled the military’s controversial “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy unconstitutional; Obama then appeals.
  • appeals After the appeal was filed, the 9th Circuit ruled that the policy should stay in place while the case goes to trial – a win for the Pentagon.
  • supreme The Log Cabin Republicans have now appealed that decision to the Supreme Court in hopes of getting it overturned again. source
21:08 // 3 years ago
November 1, 2010

Will “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” soften during the appeals process?

  • NO "don’t ask" won’t go away while Obama defends it source
21:25 // 3 years ago
October 20, 2010


Don’t ask, don’t tell – Boy Scouts edition: Jon Langbert, the father of a 9-year-old Cub Scout and a leader within his local chapter, was removed from the position because he’s gay. Apparently, other members of the Dallas, Texas chapter complained, and the complaints eventually got really loud. The organization, by the way, does not allow gays or atheists to be in leadership positions, but says it would have let Langbert stay in his position if he chose not to publicize it. The Supreme Court, by the way, allowed this in a 2000 court decision. With all the attention that gay suicides are getting right now, we have a feeling that this will eventually become a tough position for the organization to hold onto culturally. (BTW, we were in scouting as kids.) sourceOh yeah: Boy Scouts still legally allowed “Don’t Ask” policies

Don’t ask, don’t tell – Boy Scouts edition: Jon Langbert, the father of a 9-year-old Cub Scout and a leader within his local chapter, was removed from the position because he’s gay. Apparently, other members of the Dallas, Texas chapter complained, and the complaints eventually got really loud. The organization, by the way, does not allow gays or atheists to be in leadership positions, but says it would have let Langbert stay in his position if he chose not to publicize it. The Supreme Court, by the way, allowed this in a 2000 court decision. With all the attention that gay suicides are getting right now, we have a feeling that this will eventually become a tough position for the organization to hold onto culturally. (BTW, we were in scouting as kids.) source

11:20 // 3 years ago