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August 1, 2012
Thoughts on Betaworks’ relaunched Digg? Pretty polished, simple, much more visual, not listy at all. The thumbs-up is still there, but it’s de-emphasized. No comments, but they’re apparently coming. A complete clean slate, with a thrown-away code base. Is Digg better without Kevin Rose? Was Betaworks’ half-million purchase of the site worth it? And would you use it again?

Thoughts on Betaworks’ relaunched Digg? Pretty polished, simple, much more visual, not listy at all. The thumbs-up is still there, but it’s de-emphasized. No comments, but they’re apparently coming. A complete clean slate, with a thrown-away code base. Is Digg better without Kevin Rose? Was Betaworks’ half-million purchase of the site worth it? And would you use it again?

1:08 // 2 years ago
October 25, 2010
Starting a company like Digg is less like building a traditional tech company (think Apple or HP) and more like launching a TV show. And perhaps, like TV shows, these companies are ephemeral in nature. People flock in for a while, then get bored and move on.
Newsweek scribe Daniel Lyons • Offering an interesting perspective on the decline of Digg, which he suggests may have been as much about the change of its audience as a failure of Digg to keep up. The TV show metaphor is actually a very good one. While not every company will fall prey to changing seasons, Web 2.0 companies are particularly apt to them due to their socially-oriented business models. Lyons suggestion at the end is most telling: “The big lesson of Digg may be simply this: if someone offers you a ridiculous amount of money for a company that wasn’t that hard to build, don’t think twice. Take the money and run.” source (via)
10:32 // 3 years ago
September 30, 2010
1:35 // 4 years ago