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February 12, 2014

Stuff you may have missed: February 12, 2014

In a massive, $45.2 billion deal, Comcast has plans to acquire Time Warner Cable, a move that combines the two largest cable companies into one. This is despite a previous $61 billion offer for the company by smaller competitor Charter.

“It wasn’t exactly a profile in courage. You had members saying they hoped it passed but unwilling to vote for it.” — Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) on the House vote to pass a clean debt-ceiling bill.

The Obama administration is working on a new cybersecurity policy, and nobody likes it.

Speaking of cybersecurity, Bitcoin exchanges are getting spammed right now.

Klout got acquired for $100 million despite the fact that everyone hates it.

23:20 // 5 months ago
April 16, 2013
17:23 // 1 year ago
April 11, 2012
22:24 // 2 years ago
January 16, 2012

Zappos nailed by security breach, millions of customers affected

  • 24 million customers affected by a major security breach source

» A consumer-focused brand suffers: A data breach with far-reaching implications, this couldn’t have happened to a better company. Anyone who’s ever bought shoes from Zappos knows the company has a rep for doing whatever it can to make the customer happy. ”We’ve spent over 12 years building our reputation, brand, and trust with our customers,” wrote Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh. ”It’s painful to see us take so many steps back due to a single incident.” According to the company, sensitive data, including the last four digits of customers’ credit card numbers, may have been acquired in the cyber attack.

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11:50 // 2 years ago
December 10, 2011
NPR’s report on SOPA seems to do a good job of burying the lede. “To promote cybersecurity”?

NPR’s report on SOPA seems to do a good job of burying the lede. “To promote cybersecurity”?

10:40 // 2 years ago
May 14, 2011

More on PlayStation Network, hackers, and why suing isn’t the answer

producermatthew said:  Suggesting companies should learn to “get hackers on their side” is like saying banks should learn to play nice with robbers. There’s a difference between telling someone their door is unlocked and blatantly breaking in to their house.

» We say: While it’s not necessarily an even match, here’s the reason why I stand behind my prior post. By keeping low-level hackers happy by encouraging homebrew solutions that respect the intentions of the device creators (such as what the article suggests Microsoft has done with their Kinect device), it encourages an environment where much more sinister hackers might give you a pass. The thing is, the PlayStation Network’s hackers should get punished. What Geohot and Alexander Egorenkov did pushed the edges a little but was something Sony could have responded to without lawsuits or raids. Neither of them were intending to do the type of wrong the PSN hackers were. But Sony’s heavy-handed response to Geohot and Egorenkov got their attention.

11:22 // 3 years ago